17

Certain parts of a bicycle are more easily upgradeable than others, while other types of upgrades require special tools, much more money investments or are limited to whatever standards are used in its design. For some parts, the opportunity of an upgrade coincides with the older part being worn out; in other cases, the replacement is not warranted by this ...


14

Do not do that. Although the question you referenced is about carbon fiber, the answer mostly applies. Aluminium alloys used in bicycle frames are quite fragile. Drilling may easily start cracks that will then spread under stress. Even if it does not happen, you weaken the frame unpredictably. Not only the warranty is gone, but you just don't know if it will ...


14

Any and every part of a bicycle can be replaced, including the frame. (Many people would probably regard a different frame as a different bicycle though.) You ask whether there are components that 'cannot be upgraded'. I think you are misusing that word. Anything can be upgraded, i.e. replaced with a equivalent but better quality version. I think what you ...


11

Yes. Scandium is an element with atomic number 21. It is rare with the annual worldwide production being 15-20 tonnes total, so the pure metal commands a price of over $140 USD/gram, and Scandium Oxide is about $5 USD/gram in 2019. All of that is from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scandium Your bike frame is not made from scandium. Instead it is an ...


7

A pipe cutter is an excellent tool for this application. Properly used it results in a perfect, burr free cut that is 90° to the longitudinal axis of the steer tube. The outer aspect of the cut remains burr-free by virtue of the rollers smoothing the outer aspect of the workpiece as they pass over. The tool, like any other, should be in good working ...


6

A simple explanation I've heard is that metal tubes are isotropic - their material properties are identical in all directions (tube shape and thickness being constant). Carbon fiber can be made fundamentally anisotropic, i.e. their stiffness and strength differ in various directions. I am not an engineer, but this brief synopsis was given by Josh Poertner on ...


5

Cause I would have called this a witness mark from rubbing on some kind of protrusion. If it were a cut, it would be narrower and concentrated in one place. Also notice the tiny swarf pushed out of the channel, cutting does not do that. I think this fork was wearing on something, possibly while installed in another bike. Is it safe to ride? Hard to say - ...


4

You can drill the frame in some locations, though it might not be the best answer. Numerous aluminium bikes from big manufacturers use rivnuts to secure the bottle cages, even and especially on the lightest models with the thinnest tubes. Frames can be modified to take Di2 internal routing. Advice can be had directly from manufacturers where it is safe to ...


3

drilling seems totally unnecessary. you can use braces or even zip ties for that. when you go to do DIY mods always consider the many options available of fixing/attaching things and choose(or test first) the ones which does not damage the original parts. because one day you have and idea, then other idea, then you want to make changes, iterate on the ...


3

The bicycle's serial number is usually found under the bottom bracket. if you regard the serial number as equivalent to the VIN number on a car, then changing the frame makes it a new bike.


3

You may have been missing the different armrest offset ranges. I have relatively little experience with clip on aero bars, but I think offset, which is Profile’s term, relates to fore-aft adjustment. If I’m interpreting correctly, the carbon bars’ armrests can be positioned further aft. Perhaps this is a desirable characteristic that people might be willing ...


3

Yes, you can use this tool for aluminium and steel steerers. Benefit: you get a very straight cut. However, it usually leaves a lip that needs filing off to allow the spacers +stem to slide on nicely. This means it's usually no faster than cutting with a hacksaw in a guide then filing the top square. I find using this tool to start the process then cutting ...


3

I have tried to cut a steerer tube with a tubing cutter without success. I believe the issue was the machining marks on the steerer. If you ran your fingernail up the tube you could feel small nearly microscopic ridges. These small ridges grab the the cutting wheel and it rides up the ridges so that each rotation moved the cutter. Until my dedicated guide ...


3

It’s not bad, it’s cosmetic only. It’s just surface corrosion that’s got under the clear coat. Do you live in area where salt is used on the roads? Perhaps the previous owner was not good about cleaning under the bottom bracket shell. You can halt this by making sure to thoroughly clean the bike regularly and use something like WD40 in vulnerable area to ...


3

I think that's a paint defect. Aluminum would not stretch enough to flake the paint off like that without staying deformed or actually cracking. If the fork or wheel had suffered a collision into a solid object that had bent the fork, you'd see evidence in the paint on both the front and back edges.


3

I would recommend you not do this. I have first hand experience with drilling holes in frames, albeit only one hole. Although it was a success, the situation was different. The short version...on two separate bikes, I drilled into the seat tube to allow for a dropper post routing. I have had no trouble. I did my homework, considered pros and cons, and ...


3

Why have my crank arms started corroding? In the content of the post concern about corrosion between the pedal and crank is discussed. Summary: The crank arm has been abraded allowing the aluminum to corrode (oxidize). The pedal and crank connection is corroding due to exposure to water or a water/salt combination. The issue in the orange circle is ...


2

Removing a stuck seat post takes finesse, it is like dealing with a broken off stud. you need to go slow and be careful or you will make it worse. Mechanical removal (I have done this successfully): you will need some hacksaw blades, a flashlight and optionally a large drill or possibly a unibit with an extention. 1)cut seat post off about 1" above ...


2

When you speak about "upgraded over time" I think you mostly mean "ages well". Every time I buy a bicycle I want to make sure that it stays up to date for as much time as possible. And I try to sell it before the technology behind it gets out of date. The scope narrows down to the frame, pretty much, but components are also important, as ...


2

This blog post by Worldwide Cyclery shows a step-by-step process of how to cut a steerer tube and they actually use a pipe cutter instead of a hack saw and a saw guide. The motivation they give is that a pipe cutter will be already available to more people, which was also the motivation for my question. They recommend filing or using an inner and outer ...


2

quoting Chris Bell: Unfortunately all aluminium cranks look similar to the untrained eye so it is worth taking advice when buying a pair. Don't be fooled by the deliberate misuse of the term 'forged' as I've even seen that label written on the backs of poor-quality cast cranks. Fortunately, however, many cast cranks are perfectly strong enough for normal use....


2

In terms of economics, raw Aluminium costs more than Carbon Fibre and its extras. Where the equation flips is when you work in labour costs. Aluminium parts can be molded or hydroformed in a mechanical process, that requires an accurate die or mold. Once that is made, subsequent part cost drops off rapidly. By comparison, every carbon part is cut from flat ...


2

The rear spacing on most single speed frames is 120mm. The dropouts usually face backwards and can't take a derailleur very easily. Is your bike like this? If so, a hub gear may be the best option. You can get a 2, 3, 5 or 8 speed hub gear that fits a 120mm rear end. This will maintain the clean look of a single speed, especially the 2-speed, that needs no ...


2

Depending on how the carbon fibres are laid up, the flexibility can be altered by a huge amount. Different fibres such as kevlar and glass can be added to the mixture to increase flexibility in areas and specific directions where it is wanted. In this way a carbon frame can be both stiffer and more compliant, but in different areas of the frame depending on ...


2

I have the same on my own bike, it has likely been there a while though I have only just noticed it. I don't feel it is too unsafe to ride but that is my own assessment (I don't ride competitively or particularly fast.). I realised after a little thought that the cause of the 'cut' was simply using an exposed length of chain, with a padlock, as a bike lock ...


1

Looking at the stress-strain curves, aluminium is a very stiff material, especially when you design the frame to stay in low stress regions for good life expectancy. This usually means that you have to make tubes wide and stiff (with thin walls for low weight). Carbon is more flexible. This means you can make carbon tubes relatively narrow and bendy. This ...


1

If this is just to make a traditional-style pump peg, you can do that without drilling. Just buy a pump peg, use a half-round file to profile it to the tube you're putting it on, take the frame down to bare aluminum in that spot with sandpaper and epoxy it on.


1

We generally don't do shopping questions as they get outdated quickly, but I'll post some general guidelines for shopping. Just about any major brand sold by your local bike store will be of comparable quality within the same price range. Trek, Specialized, Cannondale, Scott, etc. Be careful of online brands as they can be fine but are much more willing to ...


1

As JoeK said the one of the biggest problems converting a single-speed to a derailleur setup is unsuitable dropouts and a lack of a derailleur hanger. Also, lack of frame stops for shifter cables is an issue. However, seeing as you say up have seen bike of the same model converted, this must be possible. If you have 120mm dropout spacing rather than 130 or ...


1

I think you'll find that the second most difficult component of a bicycle to change is a wheel hub (unless changing the entire wheel obviously). This means if you are interested in for example dynamo hub lighting system, you should try to find it as stock hub in an existing bicycle. The most difficult component of a bicycle to change is the frame. Changing a ...


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