63

How is this damaged aluminium frame likely to fail? Sorry. It's not going to fail, it has failed. It's no longer ridable. The head tube is near vertical making the steering very unstable and the front wheel has been pushed back and will overlap with your toes. The frame tubes are not dented they are buckled and severely weakened. If you ride it the frame ...


17

Oh, that frame is done. It’s not worth saving a few hundred bucks now and spending thousands in the hospital later. Make sure to check over the rest of the bike, especially the fork. It might have cracked from the impact.


16

Certain parts of a bicycle are more easily upgradeable than others, while other types of upgrades require special tools, much more money investments or are limited to whatever standards are used in its design. For some parts, the opportunity of an upgrade coincides with the older part being worn out; in other cases, the replacement is not warranted by this ...


14

Any and every part of a bicycle can be replaced, including the frame. (Many people would probably regard a different frame as a different bicycle though.) You ask whether there are components that 'cannot be upgraded'. I think you are misusing that word. Anything can be upgraded, i.e. replaced with a equivalent but better quality version. I think what you ...


13

The problem with aluminum is, that it tends to break abruptly. Aluminum can bend under pressure, but it does no stretch significantly under tension before being ripped apart. You get no warning, you simply get a tube or two breaking apart. In this, aluminum behaves much worse than steel which is known for plastic deformation under tension, long before ...


4

You don't really have a "frame" anymore. I am sure you can deform it visibly with your bare hands just by pulling the two wheels together. You don't have to believe me, just try. The same happens as you ride. The bent metal is not rigid anymore, it "works" and deforms near the dents. But the material was never meant to work by deformation,...


3

It’s not bad, it’s cosmetic only. It’s just surface corrosion that’s got under the clear coat. Do you live in area where salt is used on the roads? Perhaps the previous owner was not good about cleaning under the bottom bracket shell. You can halt this by making sure to thoroughly clean the bike regularly and use something like WD40 in vulnerable area to ...


3

I think that's a paint defect. Aluminum would not stretch enough to flake the paint off like that without staying deformed or actually cracking. If the fork or wheel had suffered a collision into a solid object that had bent the fork, you'd see evidence in the paint on both the front and back edges.


3

The bicycle's serial number is usually found under the bottom bracket. if you regard the serial number as equivalent to the VIN number on a car, then changing the frame makes it a new bike.


3

It will damage the frame long term, or rather shorten the life expectancy for the rear triangle. Short term… it depends how short the term is. Wheels are typically have standardized widths, as are frame's inner distances between the dropouts made to match them. Unless the frame is already damaged and bent or has a manufacturing defect, as the comments above ...


3

I would recommend you not do this. I have first hand experience with drilling holes in frames, albeit only one hole. Although it was a success, the situation was different. The short version...on two separate bikes, I drilled into the seat tube to allow for a dropper post routing. I have had no trouble. I did my homework, considered pros and cons, and ...


3

I'm not a composites engineer. However, I'll attempt to explain. Some carbon bars can take clip-ons If a carbon fiber handlebar or a carbon fork steerer can withstand the force of your stem clamping on it, then chances are a handlebar could also withstand the force of aero bars clamping on it, assuming it was designed to do so. I've found several carbon ...


3

If you have a 3D printer, you can design cable stops that fit your frame and print them. This is one I made: I have been using this version for a few weeks now and it also feels super strong on the frame. Even with some amount of force it can't be moved or turned by hand. It is printed with PLA. For the 3D modeling I used TINKERCAD. I just made an improved ...


3

Why have my crank arms started corroding? In the content of the post concern about corrosion between the pedal and crank is discussed. Summary: The crank arm has been abraded allowing the aluminum to corrode (oxidize). The pedal and crank connection is corroding due to exposure to water or a water/salt combination. The issue in the orange circle is ...


3

i always avoid aluminum fasteners wherever possible due to a lot of bad experiences with them disintegrating over time (especially nipples on fancy wheels), but i'm not a weight-weenie, just weight-conscious. i would say if you can afford ti bolts that'd be what i would go for, even though it's overkill and you'd be shaving maybe 1/10th of a gram. of course,...


3

I've read a lot of carbon fiber vs aluminum debates. Does anyone know where I can find actual failure stats for mountain bike frames? How many warranty repairs per year for each type vs sales volume, for example? I'm reading this as a strength of materials focused question - carbon vs aluminum. Summary: For a properly designed, well made frame on a ...


3

You may have been missing the different armrest offset ranges. I have relatively little experience with clip on aero bars, but I think offset, which is Profile’s term, relates to fore-aft adjustment. If I’m interpreting correctly, the carbon bars’ armrests can be positioned further aft. Perhaps this is a desirable characteristic that people might be willing ...


2

With aluminum, dropouts cracking from the fatigue caused by this is a real thing that can happen. It may take a long time, or it may not in the case of a frame with a long life of fatigue already on it. There are a lot of factors like rider strength/weight and how good the dropout alignment was to begin with. Chunky dropouts can somewhat mitigate the risk, ...


2

In general, for weight weenie information, questions, and discussion, I'd recommend joining the Weight Weenies forum. The bottle cage bolts don't need to withstand impacts. They just need to hold the cage in place against the force you exert when pulling a bottle out. They don't really bear much of a load. I am not sure what torque specs there are aside ...


2

I worked on an aluminum seat post in a steel frame for several weeks. With all hope gone, I took it to my local repair man who had it off in less than ten minutes BUT he will not tell me how he did it, and he did not use any heat or chemicals that I know of.


2

The rear spacing on most single speed frames is 120mm. The dropouts usually face backwards and can't take a derailleur very easily. Is your bike like this? If so, a hub gear may be the best option. You can get a 2, 3, 5 or 8 speed hub gear that fits a 120mm rear end. This will maintain the clean look of a single speed, especially the 2-speed, that needs no ...


2

When you speak about "upgraded over time" I think you mostly mean "ages well". Every time I buy a bicycle I want to make sure that it stays up to date for as much time as possible. And I try to sell it before the technology behind it gets out of date. The scope narrows down to the frame, pretty much, but components are also important, as ...


2

In terms of economics, raw Aluminium costs more than Carbon Fibre and its extras. Where the equation flips is when you work in labour costs. Aluminium parts can be molded or hydroformed in a mechanical process, that requires an accurate die or mold. Once that is made, subsequent part cost drops off rapidly. By comparison, every carbon part is cut from flat ...


1

As JoeK said the one of the biggest problems converting a single-speed to a derailleur setup is unsuitable dropouts and a lack of a derailleur hanger. Also, lack of frame stops for shifter cables is an issue. However, seeing as you say up have seen bike of the same model converted, this must be possible. If you have 120mm dropout spacing rather than 130 or ...


1

I think you'll find that the second most difficult component of a bicycle to change is a wheel hub (unless changing the entire wheel obviously). This means if you are interested in for example dynamo hub lighting system, you should try to find it as stock hub in an existing bicycle. The most difficult component of a bicycle to change is the frame. Changing a ...


1

I'm just going to point out some minor things the other answers have missed. The original question correctly pointed that you may be unable to change the wheel size, and you certainly can't go from small to big wheels because there won't be room. You will also change the handling in ways you didn't expect. Many gravel bikes are designed to accept 700c and ...


1

The problem I see with this line of questioning is that it assumes the existence of some ideal perfect bike that has every conceivable upgrade on it. Then you are measuring a bike you're considering buying against that ideal with the idea that you could upgrade part-by-part until you have the ideal. That just doesn't exist because bikes are built for ...


1

Best solution is to find some velcro strapped cage mount. Dissimilar metals touching each other can cause ionic corrosion due to electrolysis, especially in humid weather, rain, salty conditions. I live in San Diego, USA, 1/4 mile (400m) from a bay and 4 miles (6.5km) from ocean spray and my aluminum window frames have 1/2 inch (12.7mm) holes in those ...


1

Two things not mentioned in the other answers: you might have another accident and or the frame just breaks while riding and then it could hurt your legs or stomach, depending how you fall on it. read on whipslash injury, can also happen at small speeds, you never know. so you are probably not okay, even if you think you are and might feel the consequences ...


1

This is an interesting question to explore in concept. Or at least, I find this concept somewhat interesting to explore. In general, where would one get data on the failure rates of mechanical or electronic equipment? Frequently, there is no government-mandated reporting for failures of, for example, hard drives. In public health, my main field, we would be ...


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