Hot answers tagged

13

You have the wrong tool. Your cassette lockring removal tool has a long pin emerging from its centre, which would fit inside the axle of a QR compatible wheel, to keep the tool centred. What you have named a skewer is actually the axle and yours is solid, so the axle blocks the tool. The correct and simple way to remove your cassette is to get an ...


12

Updated based on your edits and comments. The severed piece of metal circled in the 3rd image is one of the cage plates, and was originally attached to the lower (idler) pulley bolt. Beyond replacing the derailleur, there is no additional damage there. It really does appear that you may only need to replace your derailleur (and chain). Other items to ...


11

I've just rebuilt a totally stock Shimano wheel set and it had locknuts touching cones all over the place. Go for it.


9

Thru axles not only keep the wheel in place, they also strongly join the right and left dropouts together. This structurally reinforces the component either being it a fork or a rigid/suspended rear triangle. This simply makes the bike able to handle greater forces before failure, because it distributes forces between both sides of the structure. It also ...


9

Stop. Right now. You don’t have a skewer/quick release system, you have a solid threaded axle that is secured to the frame by nuts. A quick release axle has an axial hole through it for the quick release shaft. What you are trying to remove is the axle itself. This looks like a cup and cone type so if you remove the axle the ball bearings will all fall ...


8

Some axles [Maillard, Campag etc.] have a keyway along the threaded portions. An internal-tabbed washer slides on , between the cone and the locknut, to prevent locknut rotation also spinning the cone itself. It's a good system; and in that case, the tabbed washer should be used. With Shimano hubs, where the keyway-&-tab system has been abandoned, the ...


8

How bad are the damages, can you identify what specifically appears damaged and in need of repair? Is the frame and hub okay to keep and just needs a new derailleur? From what I can see it's a derailleur replacement and possibly a chain replacement - depending on how twisted the links are. In the larger circle there are scrapes on the drop out but I can't ...


8

I have sometimes made the mistake of not tightening the locknuts enough, causing the rotation of bearings to drag the cone, tightening it enough for the bearing to bind. The solution is to properly tighten the locknuts. I'v been also in the situation of not having the right tools to remove the freewheel, which makes it more difficult. What I've done to ...


7

Looks like an attaching point for some kind of trailer, maybe a single wheel trailer.


7

Simply for your two points: For a front wheel you can buy or machine a part that will allow you to run a smaller axle on the front than the hub is equipped with. This an adapter to run a 15mm TA hub in 9mm drop outs. The rear is more difficult as hub sizes get wider with larger diameter thru axles. You couldn't make a 12x142 thru axle hub fit in a 10x135 ...


7

Most of times the axle is broken when not accurately jumping with bike (the same is with obstacles on road like holes and speed bumps). Wheels with freewheel are more exposed to this because their bearings (i.e. the place where wheel touching the axle) far from the place where the bike touch the wheel, therefor it have more moment to brake the axle. To the ...


7

It's a Maxle Stealth. They are a little cheaper and are also a weight savings thing. They're not super common but there's nothing wrong with them. They've also not been around very long, just less than two years as of now. As I understand it, on the Rockshox forks that Maxles are more typically found on, the Maxle Stealth versions are fully cross-compatible ...


7

While it has a rotation prevention value, it's negligible really. The Fuji Gran Fondo introduced this system in ~2012. They have a few of their road bikes use this convertible rear axle system. This system allows riders to swap between a 12mm thru-axle and a 135mm traditional quick release system. That screw specifically has a female part on the inside of ...


7

Simple answer: yes, but it’s not worth doing. Cost of hub, spokes, nipples and having wheel rebuilt will exceed the cost of a new wheel. Even if you re-use the spokes a new wheel will still be cheaper. Wheel building requires special equipment, expertise and time to do correctly.


7

Yes - I have personally done this, by installing an 8 speed cassette freehub into a wheel that had a 6 speed freewheel. The donor was a 26" MTB wheel, and the recipient was a 20" wheel for my folding bike It was only worth doing because I had a donor wheel and I was able to reuse the 20" spokes well enough. I even reused the 8 speed cassette and chain. ...


7

This almost exclusively happens because of external cam quick release skewers not clamping the wheel tight enough. Bike manufacturers love them because they're light, cheap, work fine most of the time, and nobody ever questions them when buying a bike. But they never have as much clamping force as internal cam types, and the problem is exacerbated once they'...


6

Those counterlocked axle nuts are binding together more tightly than the threads are on each individual nut, and thus staying counterlocked against one another. Usually this isn't the case and when you put a wrench on the outside nut on either side of the hub, one of the outer nuts will break free. As you're seeing now, not always the case. You need a box ...


6

The reason for the bent axles is primarily due to your riding a bike with a freewheel. Freewheels (as opposed to a freehub) have a length of unsupported axle on the drive side of the bike that is vulnerable to bending. That is the primary reason why freehubs were invented. As the bike industry moved more and more gear sprockets (6, 7, 8) this meant a wider ...


6

By far the most likely reason is that you've over tightened the bearings. Did you feel as if you needed 3 hands to get it back together? If not, you did it wrong. :) As usual Sheldon has a pretty good writeup on this, but the basics are easy enough. Put one side back together, tighten it up as best you can. Set the cone on the other side to the correct ...


6

The rear wheel carries the most weight, so straight off its subject to 60% of the stresses where the front only carries ~40%. Rear axle takes drive from the chain, which is on the right hand side. As the power comes from the chain via the cassette, that side of the axle is pulled forward. Any microscopic slack will allow a bit of movement. When the axle ...


6

As the others have already stated: Yes, it is possible, but ... However, I feel that the really important message has not been transported yet: Building a wheel is not easy for the uninitiated. Yes, it can be done. Yes, you will likely get something that looks like a true wheel. But you may easily end up with many broken spokes the weeks after. The ...


6

For regular opening like changing a tube or tyre do I open the little bolt or do I use the lever? You take the axel out by unscrewing with the lever (left loose). The bolt allows you to change the orientation of the lever relative to the axel, if you care about such things. What does the little screw with much smaller torque rating? The lever usually ...


6

What you are looking for is wheels with hubs that can accept or have a stub axle. Googling 'bicycle trailer wheels', 'bicycle trailer hub' or 'wheelchair hub' will yield some results. There are bicycle trailer kits available that include stub axle wheels, axle mounting brackets and hitches.


6

The wheel you have has a solid axle, not a quick release. If you remove the locknut on the freewheel side, then slide spacer behind the locknut off the axle. You should now be able to get the freewheel tool on. You may have difficulty getting the locknut off without the locknut on the opposite side turning. If you have a cone wrench, fit that on the cone ...


6

You can do it with files. The chrome does make the surface harder but it's not a big deal. This is usually seen when the fork was originally slotted to take a 5/16" axle. I'm not a Raleigh historian but I'd be a little surprised were that the case on a Grand Prix. It's also possible that it's a fork that fits a 9mm front axle very tightly, and you're trying ...


5

There is supposed to be a locknut on the axle, as well as the cone. When adjusting the bearings it's important to get the locknut quite tight against the cone, so that the pair cannot rotate on the threaded axle. As you've found, if the cone can rotate then it will, from the rotation of the wheel. The left side will get looser (but will be somewhat ...


5

This is easily accomplished, simply replace the axle from your wheel with a QR axle, at most you may have to cut an axle/skewer to length and maybe cut more threads if you can't find an axle and skewer with enough thread on it. But you'll need to be comfortable with cutting metal and have the right die set. If you try shopping around for a 120mm rear QR ...


5

Consider the design of a conventional axle. This is a cutaway of a rear hub, so just look at the right-side and imagine that reversed on the other end. In the middle is an axle of threadded rod. A bicycle has maybe 15mm of this poking out on either side, and it is supported on the dropouts of the fork or frame. If you replace this axle with a much longer ...


5

It is indeed a broken rear axle. If you nave no proper tools (freewheel/cassette remover, cone wrench 15mm, wrench 17mm, new QR axle, 2 rings of new bearings), get it to an LBS to replace it. It's also recommended to check the wheel bearings cups for defects, it maybe a good time to replace the wheel - all depends on the shape of other parts, and the cost to ...


5

As various people have noted, wheelchair hub is the correct term for these one-sided, push-button release hubs. It goes without saying that this type of mechanism is now being widely used in cycle trailers and recumbent trikes, but we still call them wheelchair hubs even though "real" wheelchair hubs have much shorter axles than are commonly found on ...


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