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14

You almost certainly have a 7 or 8 speed freewheel hub. They can do this, especially 8. Google those terms along with broken axles. 8 speed freewheel hubs had some years of prominence circa 2000-2001 and then were rejected by the industry because of these problems. They have now made a return due to manufacturers answering the pressure to fit so many other ...


9

This is one reason why we keep them on the left.


9

The rough side should face the frame dropout. The roughness is designed to increase friction with the frame dropouts. This type of knurling works because the frame dropouts are un-hardened, either low-allow steel or aluminum. On the other hand the knurled washer is probably hardened (or at least harder) steel. Thus the knurling can 'bite' into the softer ...


8

I have sometimes made the mistake of not tightening the locknuts enough, causing the rotation of bearings to drag the cone, tightening it enough for the bearing to bind. The solution is to properly tighten the locknuts. I'v been also in the situation of not having the right tools to remove the freewheel, which makes it more difficult. What I've done to ...


7

There is one other possibility that bears mentioning: If the hub is somehow deformed, such that the bearing cups are not "square" to the axle, then the rotation of the hub can tend to "grab" the cones and turn them on the axle. This can increasingly tighten the cone and increase the tension on the axle, causing it to snap. I had a front ...


7

It almost certainly won't happen with a cassette hub. It can happen on standard axle cassette hubs, but it takes a lot, and there's basically always a dropout alignment problem at work in addition to heavy loads over time when it does. Eight and nine speed standard axle (M10 or 3/8") freewheel hubs are the definition of a cynical design. They work ...


6

No, there is no functional downside in the sorts of cases you're talking about, given that you can find a good resting angle for the lever. The world is in flux on the decorum versus functionality aspects of this issue. You can see this most clearly in how major manufacturers have diverged in which side of their thru-axle forks to put the threads on over the ...


6

That looks like a thru-axle that has lost its handle. You can see the threaded bit in the first photo where a handle should have been bolted in. This can happen if the retaining bolt vibrates loose during a ride. Luckily the axle has flats so can be removed with a wrench but you’ll want to track down a new axle for when you need to remove the wheel by hand ...


5

Other terms i've seen used, on this very website, in addition to the accepted answer, are stub axle one-sided axle tadpole trike hub From wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_trailer Some trailers support a normal axle on two sides, others mount the wheel off one side with a stub axle (a one sided axle).


5

Perhaps I have put in too many/too few ball bearings? ... Should they sit snug, some slightly above the others, or all on same level with slight gaps? All the balls have to touch both the cup and cone surfaces and therefore should not overlap. If the balls are overlapped they will bind up as the axle rotates. Did you use a guide to rebuild the hub? Have a ...


5

This question about loose crank arms has been asked and answered several times before on this site, but yours is the worst I've ever seen I think. Unfortunately your crank arm is ruined. If the alloy crank gets loose and is ridden on the hard steel spindle wallows out the relatively soft alloy. It does not matter how tight the retaining bolt is done up the ...


5

Another reason to have the front QR lever on the left is if you have a dynamo hub. The wiring comes out on the right, and the connector/wiring would get in the way of the lever (or perhaps more likely your hand operating the lever) on many designs at many angles.


4

Axles break for various reasons - weight is only one of them. Miss aligned dropouts, flexing in the frame, tension of the QR all play a big part. Different axles with slightly different materials will also have an effect - some are stronger overall, some more brittle, some more prone to fatigue. As you identified, riding style also affects the axle loading. ...


4

If there was no published information about this fork, we would first observe the potential replacement is longer but has the same threaded length. Therefore it is possible to construct a scenario where, say if the current axle fit exactly flush and the dropout had 9mm of threads, that you would need to use a washer to keep the new one from bottoming against ...


4

This may not be a full answer per se, but was too long for a comment and I feel it is worth noting. As for functionality Nathan has covered that quite well above as he often does :P Some may remember in 2015 there was recall pertaining to quick release skewers and disc brakes that included nearly 1.5 million bicycles going all the way back to 1998. The issue ...


4

Cycling has a lot to do with traditions. So, traditionally on rim-brake bikes, and as intended by its inventor Tullio Campagnolo*, the QR levers sits on the left side of the bike, with the front one as near as possible behind the left leg of the fork, leaving just enough grip for easy opening. The rear lever bisects the angle of the seat-stay and the lower ...


4

Being a flip flop hub this is easier than it might be otherwise, because flip flop hubs, like rim brake front hubs, are pretty much universally spaced to build a dishless wheel. If that's true, all you need to do is configure the spacers so that the flanges are equidistant from the locknut faces. Once you've figured out which spacers go on which side, the ...


4

The first approach to take is try to immobilize the axle by getting the other side dropout extra super duper pinched between the locknut and axle nut. If that side's axle nut can be freed, remove it and grease the threads. Snake in a cone wrench and open wrench on that side if applicable and get the cone and locknut very tight against one another. Then with ...


4

"Quick Release push button Axle" The Mogo The Jac Wheelchair uses this axle fitment, and the axle is described as: Round Betty Rear wheels with hard anodised hand rings, quick release push button axle (and) 20" to 27" double walled alloy (rims) Additionally Mogo Shadow Wheelchair suggests their chair has Wheelchair tyres: quick ...


4

The advice that there should be play in a QR hub before tightening the skewer is true for a very high percent of QR bikes in the world because they have standard M10 or 3/8" steel axles, which flex under the load applied by the QR. Many higher end hubs have oversize axles, usually aluminum, that see little or none of this flex and need to be adjusted as ...


3

If the axle is still loose when the QR is tightened, then you need to tighten the axle a bit more. If the wheel doesn't spin freely when the QR is tightened, you need to tighten the axle a bit less. It's fiddly but it's as simple as that. Try adjusting the axle just untill there is no play in the bearings, then try again.


3

No, this conversion isn't possible. The 130 version has a different shell than the 120. The flanges are further apart. That's the good way for them to have done it, because if they had used the same flange spacing throughout, that's wasting lateral strength on everything but the 120. If you look at your hub you'll see that there's not really anything you can ...


3

This type of wheel is fairly common on "tadpole" design recumbent tricycles, meaning that there are two front wheels and one rear wheel. Therefore, many companies sell such wheels in this size. Look for stores that sell replacement recumbent trike wheels. The exact axle size is variable, so you should decide on the wheels that you are getting ...


3

With a freewheel system, the bearings are closer together leaving a long stretch of axle unsupported past the right side bearings. It is common to bend or even break axles in these systems no matter what weight the rider puts on it. The heavier rider will probably notice more frequently bent axles that occur soon after replacement. Seven speed freewheel ...


2

IMHO, Time for a new hub. Whether you get a full new bike...well that would depend on what you have currently, and the kind of riding you do combined with how much you want to spend. The loose bearings and freewheel just don't do well once they are worn. It is worth noting however that getting the cone tension just right takes practice, you have to do it ...


2

Please be aware of the thread you have. The thread in the picture looks like medium thread, although the recommended thru-axle has fine thread. In case you need medium thread (like me), you need the T1710.


2

This looks like 16 threads per inch, which would indicate a 3/8 inch bolt if you are using SAE sizing. It would take a 9/16 inch wrench. If you use a box wrench (or even an open end) you are much less likely to round off the nut than if you use an adjustable wrench. It could be 10mm, which would have a thread pitch of 1.5 mm and looks like it would take a ...


2

If the cones are pitted, the bearing surfaces inside the hub shell may well also be damaged. As the rim is not particularly valuable, your local bike shop may be able to sell you a complete replacement rear wheel to suit the screw-on 6-speed block you have. If you really wanted to only replace the axle, by 1990 I would expect a non-vintage hub to be using ...


1

I've recently overhauled a Quando front axle with pitted cones. Fortunately, I do have a Quando hub with the common 3/16" and not the unusually large 1/4" ball bearings. However, the bearings had standard sized balls at 3/16 in. I replaced them with with Shimano Y00091210 balls. I couldn't find the exact cones as replacement. However a standard set ...


1

Looks like you have an a lower end, inexpensive crank. The chain rings are riveted together, that's a construction method typically used on lower end cranks. Nothing is supposed to be removed or disassembled on such cranks. The rings moving on the splines will cause increased wear and eventually more movement. There's nothing you can really do to fix it so a ...


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