Hot answers tagged

26

Leaving valuables on the bike sounds like a very bad idea. Bike luggage just isn't going to be robust enough to resist theft if left unattended, and the whole bike itself may be vulnerable to theft. What you want is a bag or caddy with a quick release so you can easily detach it and take it with you when you leave the bike. Many saddle bags have a quick ...


22

Yes, the bag can cause the instability. The physics is quite simple. Ordinarily, a bike is self-stabilizing. If you turn the handlebars to the left, you steer to the left and the bike leans to the left. However, the turning gives a centrifugal force to the right, which causes the bike to want to lean to the right which, in turn, straightens it out. With a ...


17

That's fairly normal behavior. You point out that you got used to it, but couldn't "trust the bike". It's a very similar scenario to moving to a new bike with much different geometry and not trusting the bike, your body and learned muscle memory needs time to adjust. Weight strapped to the front of your handlebars tends to do this, especially when it ...


12

I have carried a laptop on my commute bike for closing in on 15 years now. Mainly in panniers (saddle bags). For a little while in a courier bag when when I was young and dumb. For what it is worth (aka the dangers of anecdotal evidence) I didn't have any laptop failures directly related to a bike trip. I even toured with a 17inch laptop across 800 km of ...


12

I just used a 5mm bolt with locking nut, and a ~15mm wide washer on the inside when this happened to my Ortleib. If you use stainless steel bolt, nut and washers it won't rust and the pressure against the pannier materials stops it leaking. I'd use the biggest washer you can find on the inside, but the biggest I could find was only 15mm. If you look at the ...


10

Yes. Don't use a handlebar bag if it affects your bike's handling that badly. Perhaps your frame is just not suitable for a handlebar bag - normally a fork with a lot of trail (ie a stable touring style fork) would be best. If your bike is a "twitchy" or "responsive" or sporty bike, then the bag will put weight on the wrong side and essentially act like ...


9

I do not know of any commercially available products alternative to velcro, but I'm a DIY-er, And have successfully mounted some accessories to the frame and handlebars using hose clamps. Their advantage over velcro straps is that they can hold more weight and can better stabilize the load. A strap of old inner tube is enough to protect the paint. Since the ...


8

Yes. I own a north st bags convertible pannier and think it works great. It hangs a bit low, so don't try and use it on low rider racks. http://northstbags.com/products/woodward Also see Richard Jones Convertible Backpack http://www.convertiblebackpacks.us/ Also try WOHO bags "NINJA NINJA" convertible backpack: http://www.wohobike.com/product.php?...


8

One possibility for what you saw is bag attachment bolts. Much like bottle bosses and rack attachment points, they are part of the frame. One interesting non-velcro option was what appeared to be a slender extending bar, resembling a very thin frame pump. I only saw it in passing and never had a chance to examine it, but I think the top and down tube sides ...


7

It sounds like you need something like a handlebar bag or a rack trunk like these: rack trunk handlebar bag The rack trunk would require adding either a seatpost mounted rack or a full rear rack. Either one would allow you to move to panniers in the future if you needed to carry more goods like a laptop or a change of clothes, but a full rack would be ...


7

I've got a Cambelbak MULE which has about 11l of pack capacity. I found that this is quite enough for day-long rides, far from any roads. I packed: tools spare tube patch kit pump a spare tyre sometimes some food (energy bars and similar low-volume-high-yield food) small first aid kit rain jacket a warm undershirt if necessary My fullface helmet could be ...


7

safely locked to the frame, and I can simply leave it there. Summary To answer your question about the existence of locking bags - they are out there. As an example (not a recommendation) Ortlieb makes a handlebar mount and bags that can be locked to the mount. No locking bag system is secure. Best Option A handlebar bag with a quick release mount ...


6

I use plastic waste baskets, mounted to rear rack by springs. The weight is low over rear tires, for extra stability.Just drill some drain holes and mounting holes through plastic containers, add cord loops, and attach springs to them. Adjust tilt so that pedal clearance is adequate in turns. P.s.Cable ties turn brittle in cold weather, so don't use them in ...


6

If you travel regularly, buy a decent, high quality hard shell or accept your bike will be damaged. Even with the very best case, your bike could be damaged - either accept it as a cost of travel, or purchase travel insurance that covers the bike. Depending on your travel and carriers, you will probably find a home made case will offer poorer protection ...


6

This is a major reason for me to wear bike jerseys for commuting - all those things go in my back pockets. (Ideally) zipped trouser pockets are another option, though jeans pockets are usually secure enough against things falling out. A belt bag (either bike specific or otherwise) is preferable in many ways to a backpack or shoulder bag. It doesn't swing ...


5

Unfortunately, you're probably not going to find a backpack that converts to a pannier in that price range. And most of them kind of suck for all day use anyway, even the high end ones. You can feel the hooks digging into your back so it's not comfortable for much more than carrying it from the bike rack to the office. Your best option is probably to use a ...


5

If you want to carry a full-sized hiking backpack, your best option might be securing it into a BOB-type trailer. A big backpack would be hard to mount to one side of a bicycling without doing terrible things to weight distribution. I have a 25L Timbuk2 Especial Viaje backpack/pannier for commuting, and it works well for that but is already pretty heavy on ...


5

Alternative suggestion - don't take a pack. They make your back hot and sweaty and raise your center of mass. Instead I carry two water bottles, so 1.5 L of liquid, enough for ~3 hours of normal weather. My toolbag and one tube is velcro strapped to the frame along with the frame pump. I wear a generic road top with three pockets in the lower back. ...


5

Unfortunately I think the answer to "Do you know any bag that could work for me?" is no, if you want to leave it on the bike. I don't know of any bag that would be impervious to a quick slice with a sharp knife to either open the bag, or remove the bag from the bicycle. You may be able to find a metal pannier / saddlebag of some sort, but now you are adding ...


5

I am not aware that wearing a backpack is bad for your back when cycling. I've been doing it every weekday for the past 8 months without ill effect. Perhaps if the backpack is very heavily loaded it's different. I do know that a lot of people just don't like wearing backpacks when riding. Wearing the backpack in front seems like it would put loads on about ...


5

Much thinner (so less obvious) and less prone to rubbing than velcro straps are cable ties (zip ties). You can get a range of colours but in black or white you can also buy releasable ones that allow you to take bags off and put them back on without being wasteful. They can often be used as a direct replacement on your favourite bag.


4

Short answer based on the little information given I'd guess two larger panniers would be enough, especially if the tent and sleeping mat is strapped on top. Watch out for the heel clearance, especially with the largest ones. Long answer and rambling: The length of the trip doesn't matter as much as you'd might think. It really depends on how much you'll ...


4

Get an ortleib messenger backpack classic. It will hold a ton of stuff and it's waterproof in case something bursts inside (it will stay inside). If you want to go real fancy get a mission workshops vandal. It is a great multi-purpose bag and it expands to fit a lot of stuff. Watch the video demo: Grocery Run - Vandal Roll-Top Backpack You may also want ...


4

Looking through the Challenge Bikes product guide, it looks like the Seiran SL is not intended to be able to have any kind of rack on it. Maybe you should talk to the dealer you bought the bike from. It looks to me like replacing the lightweight carbon seat with the aluminum seat option might make it possible to mount the Day Rack or Voyager Rack... Would ...


4

I don't want any extra junk burdening me during the 99% of rides that aren't grocery runs. I use a Bontrager pannier (or two) like this one: http://bontrager.com/model/08102 The rack on my bike is permanent, but you can clip the bag onto onto the rack, or detach it again, in a second or two: so put it on the bike only when you're going to the store. I also ...


4

I personally only use a backpack, but most of my riding is off road recreational, not commuting. I have never see a messenger bag or panniers when out on technical single tracks. Every MTBer I know or have seen either has a backpack or nothing. With a good backpack, when out on a ride, I don't even know its there most of the time, however I sometimes go to ...


4

I'll add to the already, good reasons for using a messenger bag. Backpacks, I've found, can sometimes stick up too high, making it difficult to raise your head; especially if you have an aggressive riding position (which most real messengers have) Properly packed, a messenger bag can be every bit as comfortable as a backpack. The myth that the single strap ...


4

I have attached many things to my bike. Alas I only have a few sample pictures, to help illustrate everything I have learned so far: fig1. This is a trailer I made: fig2. These are some alternate Tesco boxes: fig3. This is how I improvised with tape to attach wood and metal onto the rack: fig4. This is an improvised basket after the standard "Decathlon ...


4

I found a picture of how I did this! You can see the firmer, black foam with foil that I used on the outside, and the bits of softer foam that I used to pack everything in. The flap poking up covers the top when the pannier is closed. This photo is from when I was putting it together, so the contents is not well arranged. I make a simple frame so I could use ...


4

Topeak has a laptop bag called an MTX Office Bag that attaches to the MTX racks and lays flat. It is said to accept a 17" laptop so yours should fit in great and given how thin they are, you should have room for a change of clothes. You might be able to use a padded sleeve. I tried to put my older 15.6" Dell 131L in my Topeak DXP pannier and it fit, but ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible