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As far as I’m aware handlebar bags are usually quite heavy, affect handling and can be hard to mount on road bike handlebars. I try to avoid large bags, instead I use Clothes which you can easily store in your jersey or just roll down. Arm warmers, leg warmers, headband. Clothes which work in a wide variety of conditions. For example a Castelli Gabba (...


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I've tried fitting a handlebar bag to my racy road bike, and found it to significantly change the handling even when lightly loaded. It also interfered with the older style of gear cables which sweep through that space (this would be a non issue with more modern gear cables under the bartape or inside the bars.) Gravel/touring bikes tend to be a lot more ...


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In contrast to the other answer, I suggest going straight for a large but compressible saddlebag. I have the largest topeak backloader (15 litres) but roll it down to about 1/3 of that for long day rides when I want to be self sufficient. This will serve you well as you move towards multi day rides, while being immediately useful. It's also a good place to ...


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For one day you are often fine with your jersey pockets and a small saddle bag. If needing more I would: increase the saddle bag and/or add another small bag above the top tube behind your stem. Photo Topeak I would leave large saddlebags, handlebar bags, frame triangle bags and so on for serious touring. They can be awkward but have their place when ...


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There is not a generic answer to this question, and the reason is that handlebar bags are the best in many regards, especially for day rides and light touring, but they do change the handling of the bike, as does anything that puts weight on the fork or bars. They work best on bikes that have front end geometry designed for them, specifically a low trail ...


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