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26

Leaving valuables on the bike sounds like a very bad idea. Bike luggage just isn't going to be robust enough to resist theft if left unattended, and the whole bike itself may be vulnerable to theft. What you want is a bag or caddy with a quick release so you can easily detach it and take it with you when you leave the bike. Many saddle bags have a quick ...


7

safely locked to the frame, and I can simply leave it there. Summary To answer your question about the existence of locking bags - they are out there. As an example (not a recommendation) Ortlieb makes a handlebar mount and bags that can be locked to the mount. No locking bag system is secure. Best Option A handlebar bag with a quick release mount ...


6

This is a major reason for me to wear bike jerseys for commuting - all those things go in my back pockets. (Ideally) zipped trouser pockets are another option, though jeans pockets are usually secure enough against things falling out. A belt bag (either bike specific or otherwise) is preferable in many ways to a backpack or shoulder bag. It doesn't swing ...


5

I am not aware that wearing a backpack is bad for your back when cycling. I've been doing it every weekday for the past 8 months without ill effect. Perhaps if the backpack is very heavily loaded it's different. I do know that a lot of people just don't like wearing backpacks when riding. Wearing the backpack in front seems like it would put loads on about ...


5

Unfortunately I think the answer to "Do you know any bag that could work for me?" is no, if you want to leave it on the bike. I don't know of any bag that would be impervious to a quick slice with a sharp knife to either open the bag, or remove the bag from the bicycle. You may be able to find a metal pannier / saddlebag of some sort, but now you are adding ...


4

I have seen a lockable hard-shell case that mounts to a rear rack, but it's a specialized item and I'm not sure where I would find it. There are handlebar bags that have quick-connect mounts so they'd be easy to snap on and off and carry as a shoulder bag when off the bike.


3

As far as I’m aware handlebar bags are usually quite heavy, affect handling and can be hard to mount on road bike handlebars. I try to avoid large bags, instead I use Clothes which you can easily store in your jersey or just roll down. Arm warmers, leg warmers, headband. Clothes which work in a wide variety of conditions. For example a Castelli Gabba (...


3

In contrast to the other answer, I suggest going straight for a large but compressible saddlebag. I have the largest topeak backloader (15 litres) but roll it down to about 1/3 of that for long day rides when I want to be self sufficient. This will serve you well as you move towards multi day rides, while being immediately useful. It's also a good place to ...


3

For one day you are often fine with your jersey pockets and a small saddle bag. If needing more I would: increase the saddle bag and/or add another small bag above the top tube behind your stem. Photo Topeak I would leave large saddlebags, handlebar bags, frame triangle bags and so on for serious touring. They can be awkward but have their place when ...


2

There are light jackets available, with deep pockets, you can go for these if climate is not an issue at your city :)


2

As an interim answer, it sounds like the plastic track has been wallered out and now has play between it and the metal track. Topeak UNI Super Tourist DX Disc Carrier stock photo showing rail in the middle Topeak MTX Trunk Dry Bag stock photo showing underside. First guess is that the grey plastic foot has worn through insertion/removal over time. I ...


2

There are handlebar bags from multiple manufacturers that have both quick release attachment and shoulder strap. These can be carried as shoulder bag when you're away from the bike. When the bag is attached to bike, you can stuff the strap inside the bag. This was already buried in another answer that started with big photo of lockable bag (bad idea), but I ...


2

Some panniers have straps so that they can be worn as a back-pack, for instance these reviewed ones, (no endorsement; found on a quick search). This will allow you to carry it on the rear rack when cycling, but then on your back when walking.


2

Maybe people around you use to say these kind of things. But it is not commonly acknowledged. I often wear heavy backpacks and I never had back problems. I cycled for years every Saturday from the cheaper supermarket to home more than 5 km with a backpack that with all the groceries weighs more than 10 Kg. Actually the Saturday ride is the less problematic ...


2

I've tried fitting a handlebar bag to my racy road bike, and found it to significantly change the handling even when lightly loaded. It also interfered with the older style of gear cables which sweep through that space (this would be a non issue with more modern gear cables under the bartape or inside the bars.) Gravel/touring bikes tend to be a lot more ...


1

There is not a generic answer to this question, and the reason is that handlebar bags are the best in many regards, especially for day rides and light touring, but they do change the handling of the bike, as does anything that puts weight on the fork or bars. They work best on bikes that have front end geometry designed for them, specifically a low trail ...


1

Panniers that have been with you since the 1980s, to hell and back, camping in all weathers, and ridden on muddy roads and through farmyards. They don't offer perfect security but few people will want to touch them for fear of catching something. Even then I had a small camera bag (with an extra pocket for passport etc) near teh top, that went with me ...


1

I ride a Brompton, which allows me to leave the front bag on when folding. I’ve often folded it partway, leaving the handlebar up, and the bag on it which lets me push it like a shopping cart. Or I squeeze the catch, pop the bag off, fold the bike, and carry both in with me. Only once in five years has anyone asked me not to bring it in with me. (I ...


1

My second idea was to search for a similar bag, but which is easily detachable and I can take it with myself as a waist bag for example. Same story, I couldn't find anything like this on the market. In the United States, I have heard of this sort of product being called a hip pack (e.g. this model by Patagonia, not cycling specific). An informal term ...


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