Hot answers tagged

28

Take the lights and anything else thats likely to be stolen off your bike. For things that can't be removed easily, you may want to use something like Pitlock security skewers (or security bolts) or glue in ball bearings or similar into the head of the bolts (which will make them hard to remove when you need to remove them, but a casual thief can't remove ...


18

If your light is not sealed, and you can see a battery that looks like this (the colour/color does not matter) then you can pop out all the old batteries and fit new ones. Replace all the batteries in one light together, don't mix and match. The old ones should be recycled properly. If the current batteries are soldered in, then its still possible to ...


17

In terms of accessories like lights, GPS, etc. the only way to be safe is to remove them entirely. Remember that if something is quick-releasable for you, it's also quick-releasable for thieves. Bike lights will frequently get stolen even if they aren't easily removable, because they're valuable. There is an assortment of "anti-theft" bike accessories ...


15

First, hello, and welcome to Bicycles SE. Sorry to hear about your manufacturer collapsing... that's really unfortunate, particularly for a higher-cost item like an e-bike. My guess is that 18350950 mAh 3.7 Li-Ion is actually "18350 950 mAh 3.7 Li-Ion", meaning that the pack is comprised of 3.7 volt 950 mAh 18350-type lithium ion battery cells. ...


11

There are two reasons why it might not work: The batteries don't like the cold. Many battery chemistries don't like the cold -- notably alkaline, manganese (heavy-duty), and NiMH/NiCad batteries. To test this hypothesis, put your light (or even just the batteries) in your freezer. If your light gets weaker the colder it gets, this is your problem (...


11

Batteries, especially most types of rechargeables don't work well in cold conditions. The chemical reaction that powers the electric voltage does needs some temperature to perform as intended. If you then have a consumer load that requires a bigger amount of power, they tend to drain rather quickly since they cannot set free much energy when cold. You could ...


11

Most rechargeable batteries have a certain voltage threshold below which they will get permanently damaged. Li-ion cells should never drop below 3.0V (slightly higher at 3.2V for LiPo). Smart batteries have integrated systems monitoring remaining voltage and will have a way to at least tell you they're getting too low. In your case, it seems the system has ...


11

Hilariously, such a product does exist. It comes from notorious crapgadget vendor Thanko. Note that it only purports to charge two AA batteries, and it's not an efficient way to do that. They make no estimate of how long it would take to fully charge those batteries. I did some playing around with this calculator. Based on some guesses and estimates, it ...


10

It looks to be an older Currie Electro Drive, they were originally made in 1996 i believe. I don't know much to anything else about them though other than that is one and they exist. Here is the companies website which offers support options. I would look for a serieal number and call them with questions about battery replacement. http://www.currietech.com/...


9

Fortified Bike sells bike lights that are designed to be theft resistant. They're made of heavy aluminum and use security screws so most thieves won't have the proper tool to unscrew it. The also sell a security seatpost clamp to help keep thieves from stealing the light by stealing your seat. I haven't used their newer rechargeable lights, but I've had ...


9

You can charge it, but you probably won't do as well as you think. You're on the right track but you're missing a couple of things: Solar panel ratings: These are optimistic and assume full sun hitting the panel at a good angle. Here's the maths. You won't get that all day, so don't expect to get as much as you would by multiplying the number of hours ...


8

A 100 watt solar panel is nominal watts under ideal situations. You'll be lucky to get 25 watts/hr tied to the back of your bike - and this would be only for a few hours of the day, from 11a to 3p. Given that your bike is likely using at least 100-200 watts/hr even on low pedal assist, you're only going to gain 5-10% more range over the entire day. From ...


7

Yes, a battery holder and switch from radio shack would accomplish this. Most dynamos are 6vac and can be replaced with 4xAAs or the 5vdc from a USB pack. You can ignore the issue about polarity as the dyno lights that I've worked are either incandescent and don't care or are LED but have built in blocking diodes and don't care. Whether you would want to do ...


6

I am also searching for a computer with non-volatile memory. According to Sigma the computers BC 5.16 BC 7.16 BC 7.16 ATS BC 9.16 BC 9.16 ATS PURE 1 (according to the reply from Sigma customer service) do not save your values after a battery change (however, you can manually set the odometer). And following Sigma computers retain data: BC 14.16 BC 16.16 ...


6

Here are the indicator lights and reset procedure straight from my Bosch e-bike training manual. Voltage from the charger should be 5V so that doesn't seem to be the problem (See if it matches up with what is printed on the charger (either you have the 4 amp or 2 amp charger)). The battery does have a built in management system (BMS) that safeguards ...


6

Your battery pack is failing under load and your battery management system is shutting off to prevent your pack from going up in flames. A voltage drop like this is often a sign of one or more cells in your pack has gone bad - whether due to age, too many charge cycles, improper battery management, or a manufacturing defect. Or the pack could have simply ...


5

Yes A comment below made me wonder could a planned turn off be different to a random turn off like my original answer below. So a quick test this morning and... if you turn it off through the button on the side when you turn it back on you will have the Discard and Save option. Press home, navigate to the trip screen again and your ride is ready to ...


5

According to BikeRadar, "The battery unit as well as the wiring for XTR Di2 are identical components to the ones used in Shimano's electronic road groups. The battery can be mounted on a bottle cage, in a seat tube, frame and can even be contained within the steerer unit of certain forks (via the use of PRO's new Tharsis components)."


5

This is a sign of an unbalanced pack. One of the cells is weak and under load its internal resistance is increasing and voltage decreasing. Normally this only happens with an old, worn out pack that hasn’t been balanced or has mismatched cells. If your pack is new, I’d get it replaced ASAP under warranty.


5

I've attached lights etc. with anti-tamper torx screws and normal screws in awkward places (like under the rear rack). Both have some deterrent value over normal screws in easy-to-reach places, which in turn are better than clips that need no tools at all. Some modifications may be required to replace the thumbscrew with something more secure. But I had ...


5

I presume Lithium Batteries. TL;DNR - Charge them as often as convenient for you, always making sure you have more than enough to the next ride. Battery chemistry makes a big difference - Older lead acid requirements are complex and there is a lot of mis-information and FUD on the internet, some spread by people who don't know what they are discussing, ...


5

A quick google search turns up this forum entry by user “RNAV”: https://www.bikeforums.net/electronics-lighting-gadgets/1085170-knog-arc-5-5-battery-replacement.html Remove the trim that surrounds the lens. There are four phillips screws holding the lens in place -- Knog fills these in with epoxy so you can't use them. I dug out the epoxy with a razor ...


5

An additional downside is electrical conversion losses. The solar panel will likely be putting out around 12V at some current, perhaps 5W for a 500 gram panel to 20W for a 2.5 kilogram panel. That's roughly 0.5A and 2A at 12V. Inverting that to 220V AC and then rectifying it back to DC 36V to charge the ebike battery will lose a significant percentage of ...


4

Those are 48V batteries, which you want to charge with a 12V (nominal) solar panel. That's not going to work directly. So we look for an indirect solution. At the very least some form of boost convertor would be required. I won't go into details as we're now on bicycles.se not electronics. But designing a charger for lithium batteries isn't for the ...


4

Let's put some numbers on it. It could simply be sagging under load, or it could be overheating. Note that the battery pack on that bike is nominally 36V. The 40V you measure is only possible open circuit (unloaded), but I've used it below anyway to make the mental arithmetic easier 560W peak at 40V is 14A. If this is sagging to 31V under load that means (...


4

General advice is to store the battery at room temperature and install it in on the bike just before the ride. If the ride is under about 30 minutes the battery will stay warm enough not to be badly affected by the cold. For longer rides, a layer or two of insulation would not hurt (as long as it is not so much the battery over heats). Bubble wrap would be ...


4

You're right - a cold battery cannot provide as much power as a room-temperature battery. I had an ebike based on SLA batteries, and in summer it would get 25 km range, which dropped to under 5 km in the cold frosty mornings of a winter. It is possible to get battery heaters, common in places like Canada where its cold enough to freeze the water in a ...


4

Ross's comment about a perpetual motion machine is bang-on. The second law of thermodynamics says that any transfer of energy from one form to another is wasteful. This is a machine that tries to take the wind generated by forward motion, convert it to rotational energy, convert that to electrical energy, convert that to chemical energy (in the battery) and ...


3

The only way to do this would be lights that are integrated into your frame so they can't be removed. Not a cheap option. Instead, leave your lights and tools, etc in a bag that can be removed from the bike with one motion, or in a backpack, so you have them but only fit the lights to the bike when you need them. I don't generally leave the helmet at the ...


3

All great responses above, particularly regarding the true efficiency of charging the batteries via solar. In an ideal world, this would be so effin cool, to theoretically ride across the country without ever plugging in. I have a 1400w Li-ion solar generator from goal zero and fabricated a trailer to tow behind my Radwagon. I intend on getting an extra Rad ...


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