12

That looks like the compression ring for a threadless headset. Images by keithonearth on Wikimedia Commons, reproduced under Gnu free documentation license More information found at Sheldon Brown


9

It is indeed a compression ring, David D’s diagram is helpful to illustrate the following: What it does is transfer the force of the cap bolt to the inner face of the cartridge bearing. That then compresses the ball bearings inside properly, as they need to be, which is why the split ring is called a compression ring. The angled face must fit into the ...


7

You stated that your frame is a Wilier Imperiale. I'm not certain what year this applies to, but it is very likely to have a proprietary bottom bracket standard known as the BB94 or BB93 standard. Per the Cyclingtips link: Wilier designed its BB94 (later re-named BB93) around Campagolo’s Ultra-Torque cranks. Seats for the bearings were moulded into the ...


6

https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/hub-overhaul-and-adjustment might be worth a read. The cones do not look too bad. Hard to see from the photo what the hub is like - are the hub cups pitted? This is what will require replacement. If the cups are not replaceable, the free-hub body might be. However, it boils down to cost and parts availability. ...


6

You have the sort of headset where the adjustable race consists of a plastic shield fixed to a steel piece that has the bearing surface and the wrench flats. I think it might be a Shimano Exage Sport. If you have access to the sort of used bike/parts shop that has bins of old stray headset parts, you might be able to find a replacement. But what you've got ...


6

I can only speak somewhat objectively to the bearing size. I believe that 689 is the complete specification for the bearing size. This appears to be a 9mm inner race, 17mm outer race, 5mm deep size. (NB: Swifty measured his current bearings at 4mm deep with calipers, not 5mm). Adding a Z suffix appear to pull up a lot of bearings with non-contact shields (i....


5

Update: It's been over a year since I posted the question and I rode ~1000km on that bike. I had no problems with the hub. The cone looks better now, and performs well. I believe there were just some stains on the surface. Here's a picture of it now, cleaned and degreased. I left the dust cap on now, because last time I took it off it was a pain to put it ...


4

It is my belief that this fear is overstated, and I'd simply use Park polylube. (I've seen threads where boat mechanics discuss using their favorite marine grease on all their bike parts with no ill effects.) If worried and wanting to spend more, I'd use suspension grease, which is by definition going on plastic/rubber seals. A couple of the more popular ...


4

There are supposed to be ball bearings on both sides of the hub. You need to rebuild the bearings replacing at least the non-drive side balls. Bicycle hubs with loose ball bearings use a ‘cup and cone’ system. The cups and cones have the bearing surfaces and the balls are sandwiched between them. The cups are in the hub, the cones are threaded into the ...


3

Lightweight wheels are extremely high-end carbon wheels. By carbon, I mean that the rims, spokes, and hub shells are all carbon. They're very light. Naturally, you can argue that light weight alone makes little difference in competitive cycling. I'm not familiar with all the models of Lightweight wheels, and I've certainly never seen one in person. I am ...


3

So it is not a diameter, it is distance! 135 mm is a classic value for rear MTB wheels with 8-11 speed cassettes. 128 mm sounds more like a hub with freewheel would have however. O.L.D. is a parameter for the axle (over the locknuts distance), not the hub shell width you show on the pictures. Having more washers or thicker cone washers on the old hub might ...


3

I'm afraid the upper race of the upper bearing in your headset is irreversibly damaged. You need to replace it since ducktape is not the best material to be used as bearing race. First of all you need to check which headset you have - the make (if you want to stick to the original), the threading (it can either be English/BSC or Italian, the latter is more ...


3

Expanding on my comment cos a picture is worth many words - this is the line which is the bearing surface, that the ball bearings "bear" onto. The slightly bronze circle that is closer to the hole in the middle is important as it provides support for the critical area, but the shape doesn't really matter. Yes the inside edge looks slightly deformed, but ...


3

This answer will be updated if and when I find more information. Please note that I'm not a bearing expert. If anyone has supplemental information, I'd welcome hearing about it in comments or in another answer! Dimensions The bearing dimensions are the first obvious parameter you should pay attention to, just to make sure you buy the correct ones for your ...


3

I found more info about this kind of headset. It uses what Cane Creek calls a Norglide Composite Bearing. It is not regular ball bearings (as @Carel suggested), but just a small piece of metal with a special coating. It's intended for road bikes, and I think it was not a good pick for a heavy tandem bicycle.


3

A single bearing race really isn't very good at resisting torque perpendicular to its axis, so I'd be surprised if there wasn't meant to be a set of bearings in the top. Even closely spaced sets of bearings aren't great in that regard. Unless there's a special arrangement inserted from below, the lack of a top bearing would be likely to cause play, and ...


2

Ok, answers are not exactly flooding in, but I can see why my OP might not be the most interesting. However, I will record briefly what I've done in case anyone does face this situation in the future. Research: I researched the subject of bearing replacements a bit. I failed to find a proper single thorough article dealing with all the considerations, but I ...


2

LBLU means the seal on one side is a LB (non-contact) seal and the other side LU (contact) seal. This allows low friction on the inner seal and good sealing on the outward facing ones in a bike hub. The two are likely different colors, for example black or metal side non-contact and red contact. For a reference see https://www.ahrinternational.com/...


2

Found a drawing of the hub. Hope this helps.


2

Plastics endure grease fine - many greases come in plastic tubs or tubes. You've mixed plastic with rubber - there are many specific requirements around rubber and lubricants. Given its in a brake caliper, you want a lubricant that won't risk migrating out to the brake surfaces.


2

The cup was not worn away by the bearings. If it had been you would have found a pile of metal filings in the hub and the axle would have been extremely loose. Just because two hubs are sold as or marked as being the same model at different times does not mean they will be exactly the same. The design can be updated. That's what has happened here, the ...


2

I was able to find an answer on the Wheels Manufacturing Page with a bit of Googling. https://wheelsmfg.com/crankset-tech Looks like Campy Power and Ultra Torque use a 25mm axle and 6504 size bearings. The Ulta Torque crank requires 6504N bearing. I believe the N post-fix means that outer bearing shell has a snap-ring groove into which a retaining clip ...


2

I've replaced bushings with bearings in derailleurs I've had and noticed improvement. I've had bushings get gunked up and bind or freeze, and have had bearings do the same, but over all when my derailleur is clean, there is less friction and the benefit is noticeable. Derailleur pulleys, like all other parts of the drive train should be kept clean. I do ...


2

TLDR: if you are enough of a bike geek to read a post about jockey/pulley wheels, then you probably don't need a summary of five measly paragraphs. It really depends on the quality of bushing or bearing being used. In the past (i.e., 20 years ago) bushings were much more commonly found in Shimano derailleurs, especially the upper guide pulley. The Ultegra ...


1

TLDR: I do not believe the claim and I personally think it is the other way round. Sealed ball bearings are more resistant to contamination in my experience. I would not worry about the watt when they are clean and new. But in practice, I never noticed a problem with my Deore XT RD with sealed ball bearing pulley wheels. Even when I did not take care of the ...


1

You will need two 6805RS bearings (likely already in your frame if you had campag on) and two plastic sleeves that reduce the inner diameter of the bearing from 25mm to 24mm outer diameter of the Shimano crank spindle. Campag crankset doesn't seem to use sleeves. Shimano uses two. This PDF diagram shows the schematics of different cranksets to fit Wilier's ...


1

I'd take a cartridge to mean an entire unit, with bearings installed permanently and not intended for any servicing beyond a grease/lubrication. A Sealed bearing would describe the seal around a bearing race, whether it be a ball bearing, a needle bearing or an angular contact bearing or whatever. Some bearings are described as "shielded" or "double lip ...


1

Picture by picture: in the first photo, the bearing retainer is facing the wrong way. The more open side (the side with the little hooks that contain bearing balls in between them) faces up, where it will interface better with the top race. Photo number 2 of the fork crown: it looks to me that you've either placed the top race and it's compression ring ...


1

There are a number of different schemes for fork headsets, but this seems pretty close to what you have: Here is a different image of an older design, but with the same basic components, and a little easier to understand. What's called the "crown race" in the first image is called the "bottom cone" in the second. And this link may help you understand ...


1

You can look at diagrams of any hub. Through-axle bearings are basically in the same places as on quick release hubs. On a through axle hub the bearings, and the hollow axle, are simply of greater diameter than on a quick release hub. Googling 'through axle hub bearing' provided a number of diagrams for me. Googling 'through axle hub bearing replacement' ...


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