New answers tagged

1

The first thing I would do is to compare the actual hand positions on the different bikes. Do this by actually mounting the bike, position the hands the way you are used to, and then look very closely at the angles between the back of your hands and your forearms. Do this for both bikes, and determine how these angles change. This should give you quite a ...


2

Look at the position of your shifters. It is often overlooked, people talk about positioning the handlebar by lowering/raising the stem, shortening the stem, but you can also move the shifters on the handlebar. Make your wrists comfortably straight. Many people (and shops) place their shifters too forward/low. Try to bring them back/up a little.


0

It's possible the riding conditions need better gloves or softer tyres than you're running. It's also possible the frame is stiffer, but gravel vs road makes that seem unlikely. I run my tourer off-road (though my actual touring is on road), and have found that on rough surfaces or very long rides I really need to have my bars double-taped. I usually use a ...


0

Some things to consider (I'm certainly not an expert!): Your toddler's weight, sitting high in the seat, will tend to make the bike top-heavy. Your legs are what will keep the bike from tipping over sideways, so a lower or slanted top tube (lower standover height) will make it easier to plant one or both feet on the ground. Different bike models will have ...


0

Unless your body proportions are very unusual, I would expect two different calculation methods to produce similar results. But yours aren't. You're slightly taller than me, with slightly longer legs. First, I'm curious where you found these two calculation methods. Second, different manufacturers size their bikes differently. Bikes are sometimes sized by ...


3

Stack and reach are consumer-friendly ways of doing what you're looking for, but are limited both by how widely adopted they are and to an extent how universally defined they are. A more foolproof way is to use any 2d CAD software. Model the bikes you know are working or not working for you. If you lack a record, or a record you trust, of any of the geometry,...


3

This is one of the gold standards of setting saddle fore/aft position, note there are other viewpoints though: https://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/bikefit/2011/05/seat-set-back-for-road-bikes/ As someone else commented, to achieve the balance point talked about in that article you need to be putting some force into the pedals, and it's pointless setting ...


4

Should I feel completely balanced in the saddle, or is a little forward pressure normal? There should be some weight on your hands when riding. Not too much of course, but your setup is already slid back as far as it can reasonably be (saddle aft, 80mm stem), and chasing some abstract notion of fit when you're already at the extreme end of adjustments ...


Top 50 recent answers are included