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3

I am a 39 year old who also commutes via a fixed gear bicycle. It will take time to get used to riding like that. I was in to cycling for years before I bought my first fixed gear. I hated it for the first 3 weeks, because the feeling is much different and it can be a lot of extra work. If you want to stick with this, I’d suggest waiting until spring when ...


4

As a serious multi decade rider with two bike clubs I will say that it is both. It is partly you because you are out of shape but that will fix itself if you ride regularly. It is more the bike. You got the WRONG bike for what you want to do. Even a clunky bike with 3 speeds would have been better than that single gear racing bike you bought. Far better ...


6

I will just add that when I was your age I resumed commuting by bike after a hiatus of a couple of years. I was riding from Astoria, Queens, New York, to downtown Manhattan, a distance of just over 9 miles each way by my most frequent route over the Williamsburg bridge. I had moved to New York a couple of years before from Amsterdam, so I was no longer ...


10

Both. You really, really, really don't want a bike without gears. In the city you'll rarely ride at the optimal speed for that transmission; instead you need to stop and start frequently and adapt to flow with the traffic which is much easier if you can switch gears. Try to sell yours as long as you can advertise it as "practically unused" and buy ...


10

Despite their already being multiple good answers I am going to post this because I think each answer has good points but it is useful to have them in one place. I agree with everyone who said a single speed bike is a significant source of your problems. Even a three speed internal hub would have been much better for you. As your fitness improves you will ...


13

4.1 miles, mostly flat, are on paper doable by any human with two legs in about 90 minutes. Walking. A bicycle? it should be at least 1/3 quicker (although I would expect it to be 3 or 4 times faster than walking). Even a super-heavy dutch bike will allow you to cruise at 8-10 miles per hour, so the distance should take you about half an hour. So it is the ...


19

Great effort on both the write-up and the commitment to start riding again. Try and separate the issues: Your route was suboptimal due to trusting google Getting off and walking a bike is surprisingly tiring your speed is quite fast for someone who is just coming back to riding after a multi-decade long break You were under time pressure to avoid being late,...


63

Was going to comment, but I'll make this an answer - it's the bike, not you. No, I really do mean it's the bike..... The bike as a fixie with 48/19 gearing is suitable for a cycle fit 20-something year old hipster with great knees now and a good health insurance plan for future orthopedic consultations. Installing the freewheel helps make it more versatile, ...


3

Jay a couple things to think about: It is good you are getting back into riding. I was in a similar position where I got back in to riding after taking a break and thought how hard can 13 miles be. Well the short of it was harder than I expected. So with that said you probably are using muscles you have not in a while and it will take some time to build up ...


5

This size frame seems pretty small for your height. I would think a small or medium (50/54 cm, according to Cinelli) would be the right size for you. But that wouldn't account for the problems you experienced. It does mean that getting into an efficient, comfortable position will be harder. When you find it hard to turn the pedals over, is that because you'...


11

This is an updated form of my answer, partially in response to the other answers. It is you, not the bike. The bike may be a bit of a tough, perhaps over-ambitious choice, but it is in principle ok for the task. Many of the other answers argued that a singlespeed drop-bar bike is fundamentally not suited for a city commute. I disagree. Such a bike can be ...


0

Have you actually had someone measure the distance between your sit bones or did you just try saddles without that measurement? If it is the latter you should have a LBS measure your sit bones by having you sit on foam. From there you can find a seat that actually works with your body vs. putting pressure in places you do not like. I would recommend a short ...


1

If it's soreness that is the problem, the angle of the saddle is often overlooked. Try tilting the nose (front) of the saddle down. Shape and model of saddle also play a big part in comfort on the bike. Every body is different and it may take some trial to find a saddle that fits your body right. If it's rawness from rubbing, get some good chamois cream. :)


4

There are sizing cranks that are primarily used by fitters. They're expensive and heavy and usually intended for a fit machine more than going on an existing bike. Ones I'm familiar with are square taper so getting them on to modern bikes would involve jumping through some hoops, but there may be a 24mm one out there. Trying all the lengths in a short amount ...


1

In the end I got my hands on 2 rather different saddles to try, though both were (about) the same width as I was used to. One looked almost identical to the original, to the extent that only slight construction differences convinced me it wasn't the same. It felt awful, like the nose was pointed up unless it was pointed so far down I slid forwards. ...


3

Summary: There is no set of measurements you can use to compare seats between brands. The best way to get the same feel every time would be to find a seat model you like that has an enduring reputation. You may even want to get a spare, just in case. Details: The seat a bike company includes on a new bike is most often the one they could get for the lowest ...


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