50

It's difficult to say without seeing photos of the road layout. However, if the road itself continues round to the left, you should indicate right when you're leaving it. In general, you should think about the topology of the road, rather than its geometry. It doesn't matter that you're following a geometrically straight line; you're still leaving the ...


14

Will's answer is correct - this is to provide an identical example when driving: Source: Google Maps If you are headed northbound on State Road 213, the normal course of action is to continue around the left bend on SR213. However, a fair amount of traffic exits SR213 onto County Road 400 E. (I'm not sure why that little spur of road is labeled SR213 - ...


13

https://activelivingresearch.org/sites/activelivingresearch.org/files/Dill_Bicycle_Facility_Cost_June2013.pdf For example, the City of Portland calculated that the city’s entire bicycle network, consisting of over 300 miles of bikeways would cost $60 million to replace (2008 dollars), whereas the same investment would yield just one mile of a four-lane ...


11

I find that on ambiguous roads the best course of action is to point where you're going. It's not a standard signal but I find most drivers and pedestrians tend to pick up on the meaning. Also consider 'taking the lane' in instances like this to avoid cars wiping you out as they turn.


9

Options in order of preference: Another route. Stop on the south side, wait for straight though (north/south) traffic to stop, choose your time to cross contending only with single right turn lane out of PonyExpress Parkway. (Turning traffic is slower, minimizes damage if you get hit). If you don't make it all the way across before lights change, you are ...


8

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/12-million-per-mile-for-a-bike-lane-that-should-trigger-a-civic-heart-attack/ Rather infamously, a bike lane in downtown Seattle recently cost $12 million for 1 mile! In any study, it's important to determine what was included in the costing. Freeways/motorways typically do not include intersections and ...


8

Found this thread as I was looking for the same answer for the legality of pedestrian running on the bike lane with a perfectly good sidewalk next to them. Since I have not seen this being answered here, I'll post what I found from California's DMV. Pedestrian in Bicycle Lane 21966. No pedestrian shall proceed along a bicycle path or lane where there is an ...


7

Riding against the flow of traffic is dangerous and illegal. If an intersection or a set of intersections does not permit you to ride safely, walk your bike.


7

This is a right turn. You're entering a node from which you're taking the right-most exit. Going straight means taking the middle exit out of three. Pedestrians are not all going to look at your hand signals and understand them; pedestrians can barely be relied upon to understand motor vehicle blinkers. Pedestrians P already in the progress of crossing ...


3

This answer explores the theoretical cost differences between building equivalent roads and bike lanes. It does not put any dollars on the costs as these include much more than the road / bike lane itself (rails, markings, signs, lights, noise protection, etc.) that depend heavily on the exact location. First, we need to ensure that the bike lane and the ...


3

I would consider moving forward at the intersection, then find an easier way to turn left and, when again at the intersection, right.


3

Am I required as a biker to use the bike lane on the right side of the road? According to one bicycling guide for Belgium "Cyclists have to use the cycle track if there is one available on the right side of the road or one that is designed for driving in both directions. " However that same guide lists a number of fines when a violation occurs and does not ...


3

I wrote a left turn blog post about this. I've included a snippet below explaining the 3 options I lay out. To summarize, I would follow these rules in your situation: If there is no traffic either way, Option 2: Turn Like a Car is easy and quick. If there is a green light with heavy traffic, Option 1: Cross, Stop & Pivot is the way to go. It's safe and ...


2

Another option is the "three rights make a left" maneuver. There are intersections on my commute where drivers will just not yield, so turn right into a parking lot, ride along the edge of the parking lot, and then make another right turn and exit the parking lot into the street. It may not be elegant, but it helps keep me from becoming a human hood ...


2

I'm in Chicago and I was just chatting with a friend about how the city is getting a bike share program soon and how many accidents will likely occur due to inexperienced cyclists in the streets. And of course talking about bike accidents leads to door accidents. I think about what I'd do if a door flew open in front of me every time I ride past parked ...


2

In general it depends on the road or trail, how wide it is, how straight or twisty, how visible the trail ahead is etc. On a wide trail without tight turns and plenty of forward visibility riding two-abreast is fine. On a narrower trail with tighter turns or less visibility, riders should ride single-file and stay on their side of the trail. Common sense ...


2

The notion of straight is closely related to the notion of the main road, not to the actual layout of the road. Technically, you are going straight. But if the main road is curved (as it seems to be the case), then you are turning right. Thus, whenever you have an intersection, what you need to think first is what is the main road. If the main road ...


2

I'd either ride on the road (rather than the bike path), or I'd get off the bike and walk it across. 50 mph is serious injury speed if you get hit.


2

You will find that studies from different regions will yield different ratios. A Dutch study will have taken place in the country with the highest cycling penetration and most extensive cycling infrastructure in the world, whereas UK or US studies will have taken place in countries where cycling is primarily seen as leisure, and modes of transport other than ...


2

This depends very much on the situation, and on local law. For example, suppose the road isn't wide enough that a car can safely pass a bike. In this case, it may be better to ride two-abreast because that makes it impossible for cars to pass, whereas riding in single file might result in some cars trying to make unsafe passing manoeuvres. Conversely, if ...


1

I assume you're referring to a pace line, where riders take turns on the front. You'd think a dual pace line is wider than a single paceline, but with a single there's almost always a rider drifting to the back, either on the left or the right. So effectively they're the same width most of the time. A dual paceline has two columns of riders, so blocks ...


1

If you are in a 'ride on the right' country, you are on the right of the road and can just cycle on, without indicating, as long as you give way to the pedestrians crossing. There are options though: In the Netherlands there are people, me amoung them, who would use the arm on the side of most traffic and stick that out forward, over the handle bar. As in ...


1

Point where you're going. Specifically: slow down, point where you're going, and look at the pedestrians until you have eye contact. Calling "Hi!" to get attention helps. Once you see they'll yield to you, you can speed up; if they don't see you or won't yield, slow down and continue when they've passed.


1

In Belgium at least, you are required to take the bicycle lane on your right if it exists. Yet, sometimes, safety would be higher somewhere else. You should always prioritize safety, and it sometimes requires to do barely legal stuff. In that case anyway, people (and most likely cops) will be understanding if you have a good explanation. Keep on mind ...


1

The question was specifically about legality. The cyclist has the right of way in Oregon, whether there is a dedicated bike lane or not, as long as the cyclist is on the far right of the road. I believe the same is true in California. My answer is about a car turning into a driveway, residential or a business, not about turns at a light.


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