50

It's difficult to say without seeing photos of the road layout. However, if the road itself continues round to the left, you should indicate right when you're leaving it. In general, you should think about the topology of the road, rather than its geometry. It doesn't matter that you're following a geometrically straight line; you're still leaving the ...


20

The Oregon Bicyclists Manual explains this very well, and with good diagrams, so I'm going to pretty much copy them verbatim here: There are several ways to make a left turn on a bicycle: As a Vehicle As you approach the intersection, look over your left shoulder for traffic and, when clear, signal your turn, move over to the left side of the lane on a ...


19

California Vehicle Code section 21717: Turning Across Bicycle Lane states that cars are required to enter the bike lane before turning. Whenever it is necessary for the driver of a motor vehicle to cross a bicycle lane that is adjacent to his lane of travel to make a turn, the driver shall drive the motor vehicle into the bicycle lane prior to making the ...


19

No. In California, a car can only drive in a bike lane 200 feet before making a turn from that side of the road or when entering or exiting the road. California Vehicle Code 21209


14

By heavy I suppose you mean heavier than you'd like it to be, or heavier than you can live with comfortably. It's probably possible, sometimes, to change lanes beforehand, going to the left one to do the left turn, if the traffic is not so heavy, but that would, I think, violate your pre-condition that the traffic IS heavy. Then, the canonical way to do it ...


14

Will's answer is correct - this is to provide an identical example when driving: Source: Google Maps If you are headed northbound on State Road 213, the normal course of action is to continue around the left bend on SR213. However, a fair amount of traffic exits SR213 onto County Road 400 E. (I'm not sure why that little spur of road is labeled SR213 - ...


11

I find that on ambiguous roads the best course of action is to point where you're going. It's not a standard signal but I find most drivers and pedestrians tend to pick up on the meaning. Also consider 'taking the lane' in instances like this to avoid cars wiping you out as they turn.


9

Regardless of who has legal right of way, Toronto tells cyclists to avoid passing cars on the right, and especially when the car might turn right. Car-bike collisions and tips to avoid them


9

Options in order of preference: Another route. Stop on the south side, wait for straight though (north/south) traffic to stop, choose your time to cross contending only with single right turn lane out of PonyExpress Parkway. (Turning traffic is slower, minimizes damage if you get hit). If you don't make it all the way across before lights change, you are ...


7

This is a right turn. You're entering a node from which you're taking the right-most exit. Going straight means taking the middle exit out of three. Pedestrians are not all going to look at your hand signals and understand them; pedestrians can barely be relied upon to understand motor vehicle blinkers. Pedestrians P already in the progress of crossing ...


7

Riding against the flow of traffic is dangerous and illegal. If an intersection or a set of intersections does not permit you to ride safely, walk your bike.


7

Found this thread as I was looking for the same answer for the legality of pedestrian running on the bike lane with a perfectly good sidewalk next to them. Since I have not seen this being answered here, I'll post what I found from California's DMV. Pedestrian in Bicycle Lane 21966. No pedestrian shall proceed along a bicycle path or lane where there is an ...


6

In Australia at least, a cyclist in a bike lane has right of way over a car which is crossing the bike lane: Coloured bicycle lanes at intersections are to remind motorists that this section of the roadway is a travel lane for bicycle riders. The marking highlights the existence of the ‘bicycle lane’ to motorists and the ‘right of way’ legally ...


5

Down vote notwithstanding, here are some thoughts: Living in Boston and bicycle commuting both 4- and 3-season for 15 years, I'd say there at least four factors, governmental, NGO, population, and environmental. The NGO aspect would be - how many organizations there are, and how actively do they advocate on behalf of cyclists. In Boston/Cambridge/...


4

Dooring crash test video Hitting door - puncture wounds Hitting pavement - collar bone Being thrown into traffic lane and being run over by a following vehicle - fatal The faster you are going at impact the further the door will throw you laterally. I recently saw the aftermath of a dooring, a lady was going down a hill and collected a door, she broke her ...


3

Am I required as a biker to use the bike lane on the right side of the road? According to one bicycling guide for Belgium "Cyclists have to use the cycle track if there is one available on the right side of the road or one that is designed for driving in both directions. " However that same guide lists a number of fines when a violation occurs and does not ...


3

I wrote a left turn blog post about this. I've included a snippet below explaining the 3 options I lay out. To summarize, I would follow these rules in your situation: If there is no traffic either way, Option 2: Turn Like a Car is easy and quick. If there is a green light with heavy traffic, Option 1: Cross, Stop & Pivot is the way to go. It's safe and ...


3

Definitely not 1, unless there is a special signal to permit this. Either 2 or 3, depending on traffic and your confidence level. I've done both.


3

To me it would depend on the speed of traffic. If the traffic is moving slow enough such that you can ride at about the same speed, then it should be possible to take option 2, and make your way over to the left lane. Try to move over to the left lane ahead of time, so you aren't cutting across the road too quickly, because this will slow your forward speed....


3

I would consider moving forward at the intersection, then find an easier way to turn left and, when again at the intersection, right.


2

I'm in Chicago and I was just chatting with a friend about how the city is getting a bike share program soon and how many accidents will likely occur due to inexperienced cyclists in the streets. And of course talking about bike accidents leads to door accidents. I think about what I'd do if a door flew open in front of me every time I ride past parked ...


2

Another option is the "three rights make a left" maneuver. There are intersections on my commute where drivers will just not yield, so turn right into a parking lot, ride along the edge of the parking lot, and then make another right turn and exit the parking lot into the street. It may not be elegant, but it helps keep me from becoming a human hood ...


2

If you want to take the safest option, wait for the pedestrian light. If you feel confident that you can switch through all 3 lanes of traffic safely, do that early and take the left lane. Dont turn directly from the bike lane if you value your life. It sounds like you should be waiting for the pedestrian light most, if not all of the time, but use your ...


2

I usually prefer to get in the left lane when possible. One thing to consider though, is turning left onto a multi-lane street. You have to turn into the left-most lane when opposing traffic is turning right (pretend you're the blue car and the white car is turning right. If there's a steady stream of cars turning right, it can be hard to get over to the ...


2

Here is my list of things I look for in no particular order by the way. Perhaps # 3 leash laws are the most worrisome to me. I've taken off riding in a new town and encountering a loose though friendly Lab or German Shepherd is enough to put my bike back on the car rack. Recent jury convicting a dump truck driver that killed a SOB (Senior on Bikes) rider ...


2

The notion of straight is closely related to the notion of the main road, not to the actual layout of the road. Technically, you are going straight. But if the main road is curved (as it seems to be the case), then you are turning right. Thus, whenever you have an intersection, what you need to think first is what is the main road. If the main road ...


2

I'd either ride on the road (rather than the bike path), or I'd get off the bike and walk it across. 50 mph is serious injury speed if you get hit.


2

In general it depends on the road or trail, how wide it is, how straight or twisty, how visible the trail ahead is etc. On a wide trail without tight turns and plenty of forward visibility riding two-abreast is fine. On a narrower trail with tighter turns or less visibility, riders should ride single-file and stay on their side of the trail. Common sense ...


2

This depends very much on the situation, and on local law. For example, suppose the road isn't wide enough that a car can safely pass a bike. In this case, it may be better to ride two-abreast because that makes it impossible for cars to pass, whereas riding in single file might result in some cars trying to make unsafe passing manoeuvres. Conversely, if ...


1

If you are in a 'ride on the right' country, you are on the right of the road and can just cycle on, without indicating, as long as you give way to the pedestrians crossing. There are options though: In the Netherlands there are people, me amoung them, who would use the arm on the side of most traffic and stick that out forward, over the handle bar. As in ...


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