18

The way you asked the question, it sounds like you think the following is happening: first, the derailleur hanger wears out/weakens, then it snaps, and this causes the derailleur to go into the spokes. It is much more likely that the chain of events is the following: the derailleur is mis-adjusted, when you shift to the largest cog on the rear, the ...


16

Benefits of suspension forks (city/gravel road use): Remove chatter from bumpy roads Take the jar out of major bumps Better traction Drawbacks of suspension forks: Entire bike is heavier, leading to a less agile bike. A bike with suspension (all else being equal) will hit more holes and hit them harder. It will also climb like a pig and accelerate ...


10

Typically you would want to do an ABC Quick Check - the information below came originally from the League of American Bicyclists site. A = air Inflate tires to rated pressure as listed on the sidewall of the tire. Use a pressure gauge to insure proper pressure. Check for damage to tire tread and sidewall; replace if damaged. B = brakes Inspect pads for ...


10

There are some good answers here, but none describes a pre-ride check that is both quick and covers the main problem points encountered with Citi Bikes. These cruisers are special. They are extremely heavy, they can only be ridden in short spurts, there is nearly always a dock within a 10-minute walk, and the bikes are used and abused by riders and passersby ...


9

Auto-Mini folding bikes Auto-Mini folding bikes were made by the Austrian corporation Steyr-Daimler-Puch AG in the early 1970s; the bikes were usually sold in department stores. (Folding Cyclist, 2016.) In North America, vendors included J.C. Penney, Montgomery-Ward, and Simpsons-Sears. (thebikeguy, 2007; Martin, 1996; Thomas, 2011b; cf. Bikeworks, c. 1998.)...


9

Lower gearing (or gearing in general) is generally more important than the bike weight for climbing (for most riding as well, sans high level racing). Both of the gear choices are pretty low and you'd need a pretty steep hill (or towing a lot of cargo) in order to need the lower gear over the slightly higher lower gear. As Criggie points out, there are other ...


8

"Dutch bike" is a good answer, but it won't necessarily find you all the possibilities; "transpo(rtation) bike" tends toward the Dutch. Besides what you already mentioned in your question, these bikes typically have: mixte or other step-through geometry internally-geared hubs for ease of maintenance simple shifting, typically 3 or 7-8 gears (though with ...


7

I can only say "probably not" as while I've borrowed an e-bike a few times for rides similar to my current commute, it doesn't really suit me and doesn't come close to spoiling my normal riding. Commuting is quite different to riding for fun and most pedelecs are quite heavy and handle very differently. You may even find that your regular bike feels more ...


6

You might want to give us an idea of the distance but my wife has recently bought a freego hawk for a commute of 11km each way (about 2/3 your distance and flatter). The specs and list price are not disimilar. She's a little taller but this is a fairly forgiving frame layout. She gets 2 days round trips with the battery still showing 1/4 to 1/2 full, ...


6

Short answer yes, a hard tail 29 would be a good fit for what you have described. And it sounds like you already have a fun FS bike and a road bike so it only makes sense. The equation N + 1 comes to mind, where N is the number of bikes you currently own. 29ers roll like nobody's business, they don't accelerate like a smaller tire but the roll over is ...


6

Rule 12 says that you should aim to own N+1 bikes, where N is the number you have now. While that's completely tongue-in-cheek, there's some merit to having gear fit for purpose. For example I have a fast road bike, which is uncomfortable in the rain and useless for carrying stuff. I also have a 20" folder with carriers and mudguards/fenders, which is ...


6

Whether the cruiser style bike is suitable for the 'mountain bike trails' you are riding on really depends on exactly what those trails are like. The cruiser has pretty big tires so it should be able to handle rough surfaces just fine. If you are riding those trails and it feels OK, then it's OK. Cheap bikes from big-box stores with Shimano 'Tourney' level ...


5

From my experience, no they would not. Have you ever watched anyone ride a fatbike? Their front tire wobbles all over the place, the extra weight from the heavy tires makes fine-adjustments much more difficult, putting extra fatigue on your body. That being said, training with a bike that's not suited for skinnys will make riding them easier when you hop on ...


5

Look for a Gazelle or Batavus bike. I know at least Gazelle can be bought in both the UK and the US. Alternatively, look up what it would cost to ship such a bicycle and buy one in the Netherlands. They are widely available both new and used. If you are looking for a old one: You will find that old Dutch city-bikes have a better build quality then many ...


5

Based on your requirements I would say full suspension fat bike A few manufactures make them That bike is $6500 retail but you did not state a budget Not worth switching out tires as they are expensive but when you wear them out go with more street (will less knobby) tires If you are on a budget I think I would go with lower end fat bike before ...


5

If you cannot comfortably straddle the bike with your feet on the ground it is too big. The bike you have appears to have a nearly horizontal toptube. As others have said try to return it or at least exchange it for a model that feels comfortable. A model with a slightly sloped top tube may give you a better fit. Don't make your decision based on the stated ...


4

I can understand wanting disc brakes for commuting but the only justification I can see is that they work better in the wet. I can't see any justification for a high end bike, especially as you're going to put panniers and mud guards on; that's going to negate any performance increase the more expensive bike has. All-weather commuting destroys bikes. Sounds ...


4

Typically forks on a cheap bike will be undamped, heavy and in general not terribly efficient. All bike components can break so I wouldn't just assume because it's expensive it will last. For occasional offroad use, I'd get something with a rigid fork because (as arne mentioned), the other parts are likely to be better but also because the rigid fork will be ...


4

As someone who has done that exact commute the better part of a decade (although on a non-powered bike) and limited experience with e-bikes (getting one for a family member) here are my thoughts. By bike route you are looking at 20 km each way (40 km total), with a very large climb (SFU Burnaby is on top of Burnaby Mountain; 1200 ft elevation and the West ...


3

Whilst you will never eliminate vibration completely it should be possible to greatly improve your comfort with correct setup and component choices. The starting point will be a full suspension frame (I would choose a 29er for your application) with a good quality adjustable air fork and shock. Usually, for MTB applications one would set a sag of 15-20% to ...


3

Not everyone can ride a bike unfortunately, and with bad roads, it may not be possible to get enough comfort. Most full suspension is setup for mountain biking and stuff so that you can keep control and likely won't be adjustable enough to add comfort (you can only adjust things so much). There used to be a bike in Giant's line called the Sedona DS which ...


3

I would view front suspension as a nice comfort option for your use-case, particularly in cities with speed bumps, potholes etc. Fully rigid frames, particularly aluminum ones which is what you'd likely get in your price range can be pretty unforgiving and while fat tyres help a bit, front suspension makes a bigger difference. Given that you don't plan to ...


3

A commuter should be cheap, and work well. They take a lot of abuse due to weather, risk getting stolen, often go through traffic with risk of hits, etc. Disc brakes are fine, but electronic shifting is a dumb thing to have on a commuter. Its way too expensive to have right now, and a properly setup mechanical system will need tuning up maybe once a year (...


3

Pick the bike that works best for you - test ride, ask questions, ask other people how the post purchase stuff works. If you don't get a test ride, don't buy. Just because they all run Tiagra in the back or whatever doesn't mean they're all equally good for you - there are different geometries and what not, so you need to be fitted and know how they work ...


3

In the US, such bicycles have the name "Dutch" bike. I guess, "Popular in Russia" mean "produced in Russia". Russia have never imported European bicycles. This is type of simplified utilitarian bicycle with single speed, kick back brake, fenders and rear rack. The rider position is upright and relaxed.


3

Late to this party but some good reading here! There are a couple of jewels in this thread. The math guy proving the weight of the bike might help 2-3% is priceless. As an overweight cyclist, when someone passes me going up a hill and they do frequently, a 10% increase in my speed wouldn't help me keep up. I'm doing 7, their doing 12, you figure it out. ...


3

In my experience, riding a pedelec doesn't ruin the joy of riding human powered bikes. But if your normal ride isn't particularly joyful, a pedelec can make it bearable, even fun. The main advantage of electric assist is that it makes riding in hilly terrain much easier, and riding in bad weather much more pleasant. As pointed out by Chris H, switching to ...


2

I'm late to this thread, sorry, but ...I've tested out all the folding bikes at my local bike shop, Dahon and schwinns mostly and ended up buying the Citizen Gotham Large frame. It's a 7 speed 22lb street cruiser, aluminum frame, with all the bells and whistles. I got the seat upgrade for $29 and makes a huge difference for long distance riding. All in I ...


2

As an update to this, there are now multiple versions of Citi Bikes. The ones you want (if maximizing speed is your interest) are these ones: not these ones: Note the difference in the fender—this is the easiest way to tell the difference. You can also tell them apart by the rear light: the good ones have a single light on the fender, while the bad ones ...


2

I'd check the following: Quick Visual Inspection Look for obvious signs of damage. In particular look at the wheels, tyres, handlebars and pedals. Really you're just checking that everything is pointing the right way. If anything doesn't look right, pick a different bike. As You Get On Stand next to the bike, grab the handlebars, and push the bike ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible