Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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It is a known psychological fallacy (sunk costs fallacy) that already having spent too much resources (time, money…) on something that turned out to be a mistake somehow justifies persisting in doing that instead of switching to something else. Because it is irrational, it is hard to use rational logic to persuade. Maybe pointing out that the very feeling ...


50

Health Two decades ago I threw away my bike. Admittedly it was worn, but I had that "I have a car, why do I need a bike?" thought. After a long time in a sedentary desk job, I got back on a bike and started the return to a healthy weight and muscle tone. Best to keep the habit of healthy exercise by doing plenty of it. 3.6 miles (5 km) is 15 minutes at a ...


37

You don't bike to work to save money, you do it for the fun. Honestly, once you are a regular rider, you won't want to get into your car unless it's raining. That said, of course biking is a lot cheaper than taking the car. The car takes about 10l/100km (depending on car model and driving style, of course), you can do it with 0.2l/100km (olive oil, or ...


31

I also live in Ottawa so I can provide some pertinent viewpoints. Yes, you should report it, and yes, it will probably be an exercise in frustration. Don't expect the police to do anything about it. However, you should report it anyway, it might end up in a database somewhere and give them another data point about why it's important to build more cycle ...


29

Don't create the situation in the first place. Every large event I've ever been on would either have the roads closed down, or send the riders out in waves so as not to create a situation where a car would have to pass so many cyclists at once. Obviously the guy in the car was in the wrong, but there are still things that can be done to prevent the ...


24

I would simply steer away of the bike vs car perspective, as people will instantly start obsessing over two metrics: cost and speed. Neither of these capture some of the true benefits of cycling. I would also be careful to steer away from any language that could implying that they have been making a "poor choice" by owning and maintaining a car. Rather, I ...


22

I'd go for the air-horn, for example the AirZound. It is my opinion that screaming and yelling (the primal scream) can cause a lot of unnecessary social distress, and is not a good alterntive for traffic communication and signalling under normal conditions. It ends up being more effective when you're in "panic" as said, which is barely a day-by-day ...


19

No. In California, a car can only drive in a bike lane 200 feet before making a turn from that side of the road or when entering or exiting the road. California Vehicle Code 21209


18

Screaming is faster and much more effective: I suspect it's usually best. Or use an electric horn or air horn. About screaming: The BHSI writes as follows. We don't find that horns do much for safety on a bicycle. Your voice is faster to react and adapts better to different situations. The primal scream produces good adrenalin-based reactions in ...


17

My case is a particularly striking example: I would have to pay £8 per day to park. Plus another couple of pounds on fuel. I have a collection of bikes, but one that's perfectly adequate for this journey cost less than a single week's parking (second hand). Another week's parking gets a helmet and basic lights, and after that it's as good as free money. ...


15

For any question about law, you always have to check local laws. The general rule is that you go with traffic and ride as far to the side as safe, taking the lane when it makes you safer. In many places this is how the law is written, but even when it isn't you may wish to do so. From what I recall of the League of American Bicyclists safe cycling class I ...


15

This is not strictly a bicycling issue. Do-gooders who ignore the rules and want to give the right of way all the time are also irritating to other drivers. They are not necessarily safer drivers, because "scared" is not exactly the same thing as "safe". There isn't anything you can do; just take cautious advantage of the right of way and keep going. The ...


15

Definitely bike that sort of distance. As for whether to treat yourself to a new bike or not, that's harder to answer. An old, beat-up bike will still function perfectly well provided it's serviced. This might seem a lot of money at the time, but it's still cheaper than a new bike. You'll also be less concerned about leaving it locked up all day outside, ...


14

Use proper positioning. This is most important. Unless the outermost lane is as wide as two SUVs, ride in its center. When it's safe, reasonable and necessary to let drivers pass, kindly move over; but always leave at least 18 inches (0.5 m) between you and the curb. The driver behind you may have to wait a minute or two, but they'll survive. If they've ...


14

The three-foot extension noodle is absolutely obnoxious and a genuine safety hazard (for starters, how is another cyclist supposed to safely pass her?). The original point of these noodles, as I've seen them, is to cut one as wide as the widest part of your bike so cars could better gauge how much distance they needed to pass you. Perspective distortion and ...


13

Here are a few loud horns: The hornit: A shop I used to work at sold these and they are extremely loud - around 140 decibels, but they sound like a loud beep rather than a horn. It takes 2 AAA batteries. Costs $45 US. The nice thing about this one is the button to press is remote, so you can have the horn on your fork or wherever. Airzound: http://...


13

The UK Highwaycode states: Using the road: Turning left Rule 182 Use your mirrors and give a left-turn signal well before you turn left. Do not overtake just before you turn left and watch out for traffic coming up on your left before you make the turn, especially if driving a large vehicle. Cyclists, motorcyclists and other road users in ...


13

Pull off the road sooner. Sure, you have a right to be there, but it was quite clear that this creep wasn't prepared to accept that. Your safety is more important than taking the lane. Noting his license-plate number and car make/model as he vanishes into the distance isn't a bad idea either, in case you see him again.


13

I'm not entirely sure about the relevant legislation. However, as the question contains "deutch" I'll give the situation for Germany plus an update about Switzerland. I'd expect a) the situation to be sufficiently similar across other European legislations for practical every-day use. Summary: IMHO everyone misbehaved: Car driver, OP, and in Germany also ...


11

Probably one of two camps: 1) They just don't think it's proper to ride a bike through a drive through, it's for cars they say. 2) They don't know if it's going to expose them liability if a cyclist is hurt or killed by a car pulling in to or out of the drive through.


11

Asking whether you should bike or drive on a cycling site ... well, I suspect most people here would say use the bike. 5 km is a reasonably short commute and you should have no trouble with it (if you're fit enough to be a sailing instructor, cycling that far is no big deal). Take your bent bike to a bike shop and have them fix it up, it will be much nicer ...


10

I rode the Southern Tier last year and used a GPS app on my phone that estimated caloric output. Probably not very accurately, but it gives us a number to kick around. My distance was right around 3000 miles. Total estimated calories burned over the ride was 143,000. That would be equivalent to 265 Big Macs (540 cals per Big Mac). Not that I ate any Big ...


10

Context about OP's ride: There was a climate demonstration in Switzerland and people organized to ride there in groups, over large distances. So it was very much like a critical mass, but as a one off thing, it appears the seasoned regulars were missing who usually make sure everyone stays safe. Blocking traffic wasn't the goal and even less of a welcomed ...


9

What metrics can I use to make a judgement call about whether a vehicle's actions are actually making me unsafe The UK Highway code says they should give you as much space as they give a car, illustrations in the code suggest they should move completely into the next lane. At least one UK police force uses 1.5 metres as the minimum separation. My old copy ...


9

Be the change that you want to see in the world I can't justify riding my bike into work if I'm investing so much money on my car in the first place That is a totally bogus argument both for them to make and for you to refute. Frankly, I cannot for the life of me imagine any adult person actually believing that. It sounds more like a tongue-in-cheek joke ...


8

Having cars in a drive-through is easy because they can only go by the ordering|payment|delivery windows one at a time. Any bicycles or pedestrians in that funnel could overtake each other and make a big confusion out of the sequence. That would ruin the process for the business because it's specifically meant to only handle an unchanging sequence of ...


8

The easiest way to approach this problem is with simple physics. Compare a 180lb cyclist on a 40lb loaded touring bike averaging 15mph for 100mi/day and a car averaging 22mg for 100mi/day. The power calculator (broken link, see below) I use estimates 130W of power necessary for the cyclist to maintain a 15mph pace. At 15mph, the trip would take 6.66 hours. ...


7

I have noticed that shouting (whatever words you use) is often taken personally by the drivers. It's probably the most effective and quickest to use in an emergency as described. I've seen several cyclists with a football whistle on a lanyard round the neck (mine is on my helmet strap) that can be held loosly between the teeth.


7

I guess you have two main tasks, and they involve preparing your "internal" (psychic, mostly) environment, and you external (domestic, mostly) environment. About internal environment: You have to convince yourself, or keep convinced, that you actually LIKE TO, WANT TO and SHOULD ride your bike; You should think AND feel AND know that riding a lot is wiser ...


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