24

As a one-off, that should be completely doable. Your fitness from running and the gym should be plenty enough, especially as the route is pretty flat. Bear in mind that it will be tiring, since cycling uses different muscles to running, and the saddle may get a bit uncomfortable if you're not used to it. Make sure you have plenty of water and something like ...


14

Man, just do it! There isn't much that can go wrong. If you feel tired, turn around midway. Take a mobile phone with you in case something happens, look up the weather forecast, take something to eat and drink with you (or some money to buy some). If you end up at a different location than initially planned, so be it; my personal experience is that too much ...


12

Google maps tries to do this in biking mode to begin with: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/03/biking-directions-added-to-google-maps.html Mapquest is also hill aware to some extent: http://blog.mapquest.com/2011/04/21/cycle-route-planner-aerial-languages/ (I have tried this, but I don't think its particularly great. But I haven't tried it in SF). ...


11

Use Bike Route Toaster and make sure you are using Open Street Maps Cycling version ("Open Cycle Map). As part of the route finding options under Open Street Maps there is an "Avoid unpaved roads/paths" I have successfully used Bike Route Toaster with a Garmin 800 in the past. I planned out a 1000 km journey across Norway on back roads, gravel (eek!) and ...


10

Our sense of gravity/balance is not very precise on its own and it is combined in the brain with visual clues and other information. For example, it is really difficult to hang a picture straight on a large wall if you don't have a level tool or can align it parallel to the floor/ceiling. There are a few effects that can distort your sense of what is "...


9

Strava has this feature in the route planning tool. In the header, you can see it has toggle switches for popularity (pretty nifty if the area is new to you), min-elevation (what you're looking for), and manual. Here is an example of how it works. The below route is between two points in Palos Verde, CA - a notoriously hilly (fun) area. Min Elevation OFF: ...


8

http://ridewithgps.com is the tool my local bike club uses. It doesn't plan routes for you, but had several overlays including Google's bike routes and topo maps. As you plot your route the graph at the bottom shows the altitude and grade. I live in Seattle and find that Ride With GPS works great for finding reasonable routes through the hills.


8

Highway Code rule 300 - You MUST NOT enter a road, lane or other route reserved for trams. A road or lane reserved for trams will have signs like this: or road markings that say TRAM ONLY. If cyclists are allowed on that particular section of tramway then it will be indicated by a sign, like this above or below the tram sign: or the road markings will ...


8

Answer (tl;dr) Find another route. I checked around using google street view to get the image in the question. Some observations... There are no cyclists visible anywhere. There are also no motorcyclists I noticed. The lighting is poor and patchy Many of the vehicles travelling the lower deck do not have lights on. The road surface is patchy and ...


8

Nope - go for it. Here are two suggested routes from Strava, which were generated at https://www.strava.com/routes/new and then clicking a start and end point, and changing some options. This first one is based on "most popular with cyclists" and runs for 30 km with total elevation change of 204 metres. Another choice is "minimise elevation change" which ...


7

I would avoid the LIE Service Road At all costs during rush hour. A couple of friends of mine have actually been issued tickets for riding on the service road. It seems to be illegal according to the New York State Department of Transportation. Additionally many of the bicycle deaths on Long Island have occurred on the service road. We rode the service ...


6

You could use ridewithgps to build your map. It allows you to drag waypoints off the main route and re-routes (can be used without auto routing as well if you prefer). You'll have to pay if you want to print from their site. However, you can print a cue sheet free or export the saved map in GPX or TCX format to print with another application or website ...


6

Road climbs are graded according to elevation change and overall length. The classifications start at "category 5" and go upto "category 1" and finally "Hors Category". Here's a list of "Hors" climbs from the Tour de France throughout its history. These are the hardest road climbs that are doable (at a non-embarrassing pace) by elite athletes. Generally ...


6

The most common cause in my vicinity is headwind / tailwind. However, there are places where the background gives subtle clues indicating an inclination (or lack thereof) at odds with gravity. This is sometimes known as a 'gravity hill' or 'magnetic mountain', or something similar. There's a long list of places in the Wikipedia These external clues can be of ...


6

In general, I don't think there is a tool right now that does exactly what you want, but you can get close. It sounds like you tried Google Maps, and hopefully when you did you clicked on the Bike Route option to see the suggested route. That is not going to minimize the different roads and turns because it is optimized for safer, lower-speed roads. One nice ...


6

None of them will be "right" Strava may throw away your elevation data depending on the device used to record it. So for any phone-based app the height is ignored, and your track is placed on a map, then the known elevation is read off that. For devices with known-good barometric sensors (Garmins and some others) the data in the upload IS used by strava....


5

This obviously depends entirely on your fitness level and your experience on a bike. I will say that of all typical 15km rides, the ride between Delft and Rotterdam would likely be in the bottom 5% of difficulty, along with most of the rest of the Netherlands. I haven't done that route specifically, but from my time cycling through the Netherlands I can say ...


5

This is an impossible question for the mapping sites to answer. They come up with heuristics about what makes a good route, that will do a pretty good job, but there is fine detail they do not and cannot know. For example, Your route 2 is the easiest on paper, but what if it poorly sealed with course chip and has lots of rubbish and stones in the shoulder. ...


5

No, it's not a good idea If you said that you see many cyclists every time you drive there, then that would be a route to consider. But you see only a few cyclists. The Wikipedia page says the lower level [is] for through-traffic and trucks servicing buildings on the road Forget it. Find a route cyclists use. Your first priority should be to survive ...


5

The people at Audax UK have given this some thought. They regard the gold standard as counting contours on an Ordnance Survey map (for those not in the UK, the output of our national mapping agency can be expensive, but is very good). This is rather tricky in areas with lots of features, such as towns, and is tedious at the best of times. It works best ...


4

Yes, use strava map builder, and turn on the min elevation option: The only bad thing about the app builder is the app itself is sluggish over time (something wrong with my browser?), but it's no a big deal, since you can always save a route and refresh the page. Also, If I plan a long route, I've found strava heatmap is pretty useful , although popular ...


4

Like Gary said, finding something that does exactly what you want may be difficult. However, I like to use ridewithgps.com to plan my routes. It's optimized for cycling routes (so keeps you off freeways and can use bike paths if available) and you can have distance markers and points of interest markers along the way. I only use the basic plan. Their paid ...


4

Our LBS has a Saturday morning ride for which we often get beginners. Many are no longer young and not particularly fit. They can do 17 miles of flat ride before lunch. I wouldn't worry about the amount of exercise if you have a nice break in the middle. Discomfort after that much riding is more of a worry. Allow enough time, about two hours each way ...


4

I typically tell people that any normal healthy novice can get on a bicycle and do 10 miles per hour without difficulty, so if you can walk for two hours stop for lunch and walk back, then you can do this with less work. Pack water, a cellphone and lunch money. If things go wrong you can put the bike in the boot of a cab.


4

You need to exercise judgment based on your circumstances. I generally agree with the advice to ride on arterial roads rather than side streets. But in my own town, there are some arterials I'll gladly ride on, and some I won't go near. There are many side streets that would be slow, with constant stopping, and a couple that are practically bike highways. ...


3

There is a map maintained by a Bike Radar person https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF&msa=0&msid=113029186218946556099.0004785d476236cd4866c&dg=feature


3

In all seriousness the only places I can think of where I've seen cobbles would be town centres. If you do a search on Google Images there are some stories dated 2013 which have images of the cobbled Market Place in Beverley - ironically the story there is that the council wanted to tear them up for health and safety reasons. I'm pretty sure I once rode ...


3

For the BRouter-web frontend and BRouter Android application, there is also many script based custom routing profiles that calculate with SRTM based elevation of supposed routes. The fully offline mode, together with LocusMap/OSMAnd/Oruxmaps applications, can be great advantage.


3

https://bikeroll.net shows you a nicely colored altitude profile where you can easily spot out the difficult part of the route.


3

http://brouter.de/brouter-web/ Uses OpenStreetMap which is usually much better than Google Maps for Cycling. There are also 2 distinct bicycle profiles (fastbike and trekking) available and you can customize them.


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