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31

I'm 65, and doing 60-70 miles a week on local roads, trails and hillsides. I'm not a kamikaze biker anymore, but it's still wholly worthwhile. Injuries just take longer to heal, and I'm not so patient anymore. You're only in your 30s and you're wondering if you're too old? Find a safer sport, buddy. Ironically, I'm wondering when I'll be too old. Not even ...


11

No, age will not restrict you. You're not as young as you used to be, but in a good way: you won't have physical limitations of age, but you'll be more observant and thoughtful about what works for you and what doesn't, and less likely to take a "walk it off" approach to injury. Age-related losses have not set in. In short, you're fine. One ...


5

It looks a lot like the logo for BlackEye bikes. They seem to have two different styles of the letter "B" in their logo. The one that looks the most like the logo in your picture looks like this BlackEye Killroy The other style of "B" appears on the header of their web page. The backwards facing arrows are more pronounced Here is a bike ...


5

It depends a lot on your previous life style. Whether you have been practising sports on a regular basis or led a rather sedentary life. Anyway it will not be something that you are going to enter at full speed. First you'll have to acquire the necessary riding technique, skills and bike handling knowledge. It would be comparable to skiing where you won't go ...


4

Whatever housing stop contained the pictured housing end has a hole that's too big. Most BMX brake levers have barrel adjusters. If this is true for yours, and as you indicate this occurred at the brake lever end, replace the barrel adjuster. You need to get the right size, and there are several possibilities. Real BMX shops tend to have all the sizes, but ...


4

It was set up without a spindle adapter. There can't be any wiggle between the sprocket and the spindle, or else something like this will happen.


3

Bog-standard BMX, probably Chinese, likely from a department store. The brake is a touch fancy but nothing else is remarkable.


3

A good example of using 20" wheels for a serious bicycle is the Moulton. Although there is nothing of a BMX bike except the 20 inch wheels. The problem with using a BMX frame is that it is sized very small. This makes it difficult for a rider to find an efficient riding position for long rides. The points about the smaller wheels benefits in the ...


2

The bicycle in question has single-speed rear hub and aluminum frame: Let's consider your options. There is no space to fit any sort of a cassette or a multispeed freewheel to provide more than a single gear at the drive side (but see below). You might be able to find a two-speed freewheel like the one on the picture below. Even if it fits the hub and ...


2

You can buy basic 3 speed freewheels on eBay. With that and a claw-style derailleur you should be able to set up a 3 speed system. You might want to just get a different bike instead though.


2

The second bike in the original post is a "Hangover" by "Total BMX" this model is the H2 The head tube on the bike does not have the stamped logo in the first image. There have been several versions of the Hangover - currently on H4. The headtube always has a sticker. I'm still looking for the stamped logo EDIT: As Fatalize said it is ...


2

Sadly serial numbers are useless - they're not a VIN like cars have and only mean something to the manufacturer, who may have encoded info in the number, or may not even have kept track of the numbers. If you have a sample of the paint you want, take it to an automotive paint specialist and ask for a colour match. Not your local big-box store, somewhere ...


2

Properly treated timber will last decades in the ground. Wood treatments are generally rated for there preservation ability. Different treatments are used for protection from insect and moisture damage, and the timber is treated to suit the local conditions. Most countries have a set of standards - e.g. American Wood Protection Association for USA. Some ...


1

(mattnz already answered most things but this is too long for a comment so here it goes) Has anyone seen this/have any feedback? I built this once just to see what would happen. Also have used wood for filling up (as a beginner). Observations: it works, but not really worth the time or effort. Unless you're really building a huge table probably. all in ...


1

All we can see is a logo of a B with spikes to the left, a top tube reinforcement plate which implies a BMX as does the fork with no visible brakes, and a matt-black rattlecan spray paint job. I don't recognise the logo, but someone might. Sadly a bike getting sprayed like this is normally because its not worth a good paint job, so if you're expecting a ...


1

Possibly a THRODWN. The BMX brand was started in 2015.


1

Serial number is quite useless, but still, a bike with a similar serial number can be seen here: https://bikeindex.org/bikes/633505 Serial number may be similar by chance, or it may come from the same factory. If your bike is similar to the bike depicted there, you may have got a bmx branded MCS, unlikely it is from 80s, likely to be some mass produced ...


1

I've looked back at some of the BMX types of my youth years and recall there weren't many Skyway wheels with as many plastic spokes, ie, 7. This may be your best search technique if the bike is totally original to when new. Also another rare feature is the small triangular inserted section on the underside of the frame positioned near to the Head-tube&...


1

Rear wheel is also way too far forward, possibly the chain is elongated or even just too long given the mount of droop. Can't really see, but the front rim looks more worn than the rear, suggesting there may have been a front brake which was removed possibly ? Top part of headset looks wrong - perhaps plastic. There's also rust in most of the welds, it needs ...


1

Most (all?) bicycles with one-piece cranks accept "standard" 1/2" pedals. The thread is 1/2-20, with the left pedal being left-hand threaded. The wrench size and type varies depending on the pedal. Many cheap or old-school BMX bikes have one-piece cranks.


1

Most pedal threads are 9/16" with the left pedal being left-hand thread (ie backwards to normal) Kids bikes might have 1/2" axles or 9/16" There were some crazy metric threads used in the 80s but they were very rare and never took off. Not sure how you got it to work into a 15/32" other than that's vaguely close to 1/2" suggesting ...


1

At 28 years of age you are still quite young and actually many freeride pros are in their 30s. Well sure maybe they started MTB & BMX when they were 10 or 15 but you still have at least a decade to make progress! Here is my personal anecdote: I had done lots of mountain biking, wheelies etc. when I was 10 - 20 years old but then other stuff got on the ...


1

My son and I have had direct experience with this (he is helping me write this). I realize this thread is very old, but I put this here in case others are finding it. First, check the chain. If it is worn too much (they elongate over time) it won't grab the teeth. Second, Check the chainring, Are the teeth sharp? If so, you need to replace it? Third, ...


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