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14

I think that's a generic chinese bottle holder cage with the word "Bontrager" printed on it. The price alone implies its not "authentic". Any cage that employs friction as a retaining mechanism will scratch up bottles/bidons after a while. limit the scratching, using a layer around the bottle (a clean sock soaked in water used to be a pro thing to ...


11

You don't have to buy new bottles every time they look scratched -- they're still perfectly functional as water bottles. Depending on cage design, you may find that plastic or carbon fiber cages don't scratch bottles as much (but you have essentially some light paint on a water bottle, and if you rub it enough with any bottle cage it will eventually come ...


11

looks like plastic or rubber plugs in the braze-ons. Try to remove them — I think there are a threads under them.


11

Openstreetmap with the cycle layer certainly shows some. Here's one I was very grateful for in the French Alps. OSM is not complete but it's open source so you can improve it (I haven't added any taps, but I have added bike parking). This is a good approach, as it also shows cafes and shops where you should be able to buy water if there's no tap (flipping ...


9

The approach I've seen is to use hose clamps to hold a bottle cage to the frame. Hose clamps are what (used to?) attach a car's radiator hose to the radiator, if you've seen that. If you have an old inner tube, you can slice that into strips to pad between the clamps and the frame so the paint doesn't get scratched.


6

Nylon zip ties. No tools required, no holes to drill and easily reversible.....you can even get 'em in colors.


6

Yes, it is possible to install a set of water bottle "braze-ons" on a frame which was not originally supplied with them. It requires a very specific set of tools and parts. The video below shows how a Rivnut works. The second video wexpolains how to install a set in a bicycle frame.


6

In the USA free tap water is virtually universal, and I was able to fill up my water bottles at any fast food restaurant and convenience store I stopped at, all over the country. A switch on most restaurant soda fountains will dispense plain tap water. I also filled up at local parks and roadside rest areas.


5

Clamps are easy and reversible - causing little or no damage to tubing (metal jubilee clips might scratch paintwork, but there are plastic versions which work well) I'm loath to drill holes in perfectly good tubing - I also would be worried about metal shavings falling to the bottom of the tube and causing problems in a bearing race.


5

Good question - I've wondered the same. I looked at the Specialized SWAT toolbox for inspiration, but it only fit certain models of frame. https://www.specialized.com/us/en/equipment/bike-accessories/swat-technology/c/swatstorage Another option is to mount things directly to the waterbottle cage mounts. Here's another specialized product to do exactly ...


5

Drilling the seat tube is a bad idea, for the reasons you've indicated. Very rarely a bike shop will have a tool for reaming a seat tube (more usually framebuilders have those) that can to the task in a slightly safer way. BUT from my experience with a welded steel frame where I didn't bother to back-purge (lesson learned!), even once you weld an extension ...


4

Bacteria need nutrients to grow, and plain water doesn't have any. So all that's needed is a rinse with clean water and air drying. There's really no reason for all this sterilization stuff. It accomplishes virtually nothing other than making you feel tidy. However, if you add stuff to the bottle that contains nutrients, such as sports drinks, then the ...


4

First of all: You mention that the placement of the bottle mount is bad. There are adapters which allow you to mount a bottle cage without frame holes. E.g. SKS Anywhere, Minoura or this set. All look rather flimsy though. Mounts for the handlebar or behind the saddle usually look more sturdy, if you have space there. There is also the Salsa Anything Cage ...


4

Job completed - it worked well. Starting off with the finished product: Start by measuring accurately. I put a bottle in each cage and then tested placements, considering the band-on clamp for the FD and the toolbag I have in the front of the frame triangle, which lead to a slightly high seat tube position, and a slightly low downtube bottle. Then I used ...


4

That does not appear to be a attachment for mounting a bottle cage to a frame tube. The two holes in the mount appear to match the two holes in the upper plate of the cage, which orients the mount incorrectly for clamping a frame tube. My guess is that it's for mounting to handlebars - which have a standard diameter, unlike frame tubes. mounts for frame ...


4

Get a clamp-on solution like the SKS Anywhere, Topeak VersaMount or Elite VIP. As Nate W pointed out in the comments, make sure it doesn’t interfere with your cables. A quick and dirty solution with cable ties and duct tape can work temporarily as well. There are also bottle cage mounts which clamp to the saddle’s rails, for example the TacX Saddle Clamp:...


4

Product recommendations are generally not the thing here. There is however a reputed 4-letter Swiss company that has been producing internally glazed aluminium water bottles especially for cycling, properly fitting in standard bottle cages for many decades now. And since it is Swiss it will certainly go on for much longer. The problem however with ...


3

There are a number of commercial products available to move bottle cages up or down from the existing braze-ons. They're marketed as a Bottle Cage Relocator or Bottle Cage Adapter, but essentially they're all a flat piece of metal with holes drilled into it that may have some finishing work to make it look nicer. Given they're in the $10 range it's probably ...


3

Most the bottles i have seen are dishwasher safe, top rack only, although i have washed some on the bottom without any obvious side effects, you may turn the heated dry off if your dishwasher has it though as they may warp. Many hydration products such as bottles and bladders are made of TPU (Thermoplastic Polyurethane) or some variation of it. One thing ...


3

The first step is to probably check the bottle for the icon shown below to identify that the manufacturer has said the product is Dishwasher Safe. I just checked my bottles, and they don't contain an icon saying they are dishwasher safe, but it does thankfully have the "food safe" icon. On the manufacturer web site it says that the bottles are dishwasher ...


3

I recently saw an instructional video that you might be interested in: While there are some off-the-shelf products that are similar (the one I use is the Z-box by Zefal, in the large/adjustable size), this video's DIY hack has the advantages of being cheap (or free if you have an extra bottle laying around that fits the bill)...


3

You could try a DIY custom fiberglass tool compartment for that area. Take a block of styrofoam, whittle/ carve it into the perfect shape to fit that area for your specific bike/bottle combo, then use that as a mold to wrap 1-2 layers of fiberglass around (using a fiber glass repair kit from automotive store), then cut the end or top off that, and you have ...


3

You might also be interested in the B-RAD system by Wolf Tooth. http://www.bikepacking.com/gear/wolf-tooth-b-rad/ It looks pretty adaptable and enables you to reposition the bottle(s) to allow for an accessory strap mount. For example, like this: NOTE: The frame they chose to model the product doesn't look like the best use case. Removing/inserting that ...


3

There are a number of options here: Use a hydration pack on your back Use a hydration pack in a framebag Use a feedbag attached to the handlebars to hold a waterbottle Get creative! There's lots more ways to carry water out on the trail. Clamps, drilling, etc into the frame are probably not the best idea for maintaining the integrity of the frame and ...


3

Specific product recommendations are off-topic for Bicycles.SE. There are some bottle cages for larger-than-usual bottles, but water bottles for bikes come in a standard size with a diameter of about 2¾" and a shoulder about 5" along its length, and most cages are designed specifically for that.


3

i always avoid aluminum fasteners wherever possible due to a lot of bad experiences with them disintegrating over time (especially nipples on fancy wheels), but i'm not a weight-weenie, just weight-conscious. i would say if you can afford ti bolts that'd be what i would go for, even though it's overkill and you'd be shaving maybe 1/10th of a gram. of course,...


2

Hose clamps work. Might put a piece of foam to stop the cage from rattling.


2

For cleaning my bottles in the worst case scenario, mud/dirt/grit on the outside, drink mix on the inside and then left for days my car to get funky after a ride. Rinse bottle outside and inside with tap water. Use a soft sponge or rag with some dish soap the outside of the bottle to remove any stubborn mud. A little Friction is necessary. Foam bottle ...


2

The inexpensive bottle cages can be bent to make them a little smaller for a tighter fit. If the type you have is a closed loop type you can add rubber bands to the bottle for a more secure fit if it is loose. There seems to be a lot more size variation with generic "sport bottles" than the bottles marketed to cyclists.


2

I had the same problem of too-low bottle bosses (since I prefer to use short bottles), and could not simply use a clamp-on bracket because the down tube is not round but "streamlined" (yeah, right). What I did is get a strip of aluminum bar (from a hardware store). Without going out to the garage to look at it, I'm thinking it's about 1" wide and 1/4" ...


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