14

Adding pictures to Weiwen's answer... Here is a picture of a brake lever with the part in question circled in blue. It is a quick release mechanism integrated into the brake lever that allows increasing the space between the brake pad and the rim for easy wheel removal. Flipping the lever to the right or left in effect makes the brake cable longer allowing ...


12

Not really. The levers in the second picture are commonly called "interrupter" levers, and are usually used in addition to the levers you've already got. I think you'd find that if you simply tried to relocate your existing levers, they wouldn't fit against the tops of the bars very well, and the way the levers are curved would cause them to bump into the ...


11

Their purpose differs between hydraulic and mechanical brakes. On these cantilever brakes, the purpose is simply to adjust the rest position of the brake. If you have the screw fully wound out, you should not feel any difference if you remove them. BUT there is be a real difference in properly bled hydraulic disc brakes: Here, it is used is to adjust the ...


11

I was hesitating to flag this post as a duplicate of Why don't brakes come with 'Safety Levers' any more?, but the other post is rich in the names of those "dual-pull" brake levers which in fact answers the OP's question. So the names are: Dual pull Safety Levers (manufacturer's term) Extension Levers (Sheldon Brown) Suicide levers (wikipedia) ...


11

I assume by 'pin' you mean the following part: This part is called the 'insert' or 'connecting insert' and its purpose is to 'support' the (non rigid) brake hose in order to prevent it from crushing/reducing drastically in diameter when the sleeve nut is tightened causing the olive to be compressed onto the brake hose. In other words: When tightening the ...


9

It's because you have a combination of brake levers designed for V-brakes and side pull brakes. V-brakes need more cable pull for the same effect, so your levers pull the cable too fast. The solution is to get levers designed for caliper brakes, something like for example this (note "Caliper or Canti Brake Lever System"): http://www.tektro.com/_english/...


9

TL;DNR - single finger levers have little (if any) advanatage and some disadvantages. Most people do not start out cycling with XT/Ultegra quality bikes and therefore (do not) start out on bikes that have brakes good enough for one finger control. Even today, many low end disc brakes cannot reach full braking potential (i.e. wheel lock), with one finger. ...


9

That is a brake quick release lever. Sometimes, our tires are slightly too big to fit through the brake pads when we remove a wheel from the bike. That quick release lever releases a bit of cable, thus opening the brakes wide enough to extract the tires without issue. On most modern rim brake bicycles, I believe the fashion has been to put the lever on the ...


8

These are referring to pad spacers. They essentially increase or decrease the amount of motion you have when moving the brake levers. See page 16 of the following PDF for a better diagram: Shimano Brake Levers User Guide


8

It sounds like air is trapped in the system and you should do a rebleed. Just start over, follow the manufacturer instructions carefully, take your time and be very careful to get ALL of the bubbles out. I don't see any evidence that anything is wrong with the brake or the rotor or anything else. Yeah, new pads do need to be bedded in, but when you say the ...


7

A long pull lever (i.e. for V-brakes, mountain mechanical discs) pulls the cable about twice as long (but about half as hard) as a short pull lever (caliper, cantilever, road discs). This is determined by the distance between where the cable ends and where the lever pivots. According to this thread, its significantly lower for short pull than for long pull ...


7

It's almost certainly a Gran Compe SHOT LEVER two handle brake lever. This description matches quite well and there's some comments on Bike Forums. Simply, both levers operate the same brake, but on a narrow bar where you don't have room for two levers for two brakes it's a good compromise.


7

There is nothing obviously wrong with your handlebar setup. As long the shift and brake levers are easily accessible and you don't have to rotate your wrists or shift your hand laterally along the bar to reach them everything is OK Maybe I'd consider moving the levers slightly outwards (and I note there is a slight difference in position, the right hand ...


7

Braking is always stronger from the drops than the hoods, as you noted only your lower fingers have mechanical advantage when braking from the hoods, when braking from the drops you have much better mechanical advantage for all your fingers. That said, when properly set up, you should have no problems locking up both wheels on gravel from the hoods. You ...


7

Presumably you have drop bars. Inline brake levers are your only choice. The only places to mount extra levers on drop bars are tops. With inline levers installed you can reach levers from the drops, hoods and tops, so you really don't need levers anywhere else.


7

The standard setup is left for front and right for rear for gears. For gears you would need special left rear and right front shifters, which are not manufactured. It is very unlikely that you had those, and they converted to normal shifters during one ride, at the same time as cables rerouted themselves.


7

These caps are indeed removable. They are protective caps on your brake mount bosses, to prevent the paint getting on the surface of the brake mount or threading, in the factory. They've done their job so simply remove them and install your brakes as normal, they should just pull off.


6

There are two types of brake anchor (one is plum-shaped, the other is barrel-shaped or cylindrical). If you have the wrong one at the brake end, it won't fit properly and will slide around. To solve this, some brake cable vendors sell their cables with both types of end anchors attached. You just use the end that you need and cut off (with a proper brake ...


6

It is true that the old style brake levers were not as powerful from the hoods as modern ones. The reason is geometry. The picture below shows how old and new levers move when pulled. With old levers, braking from the hoods requires one to pull back and push down at the same time. As said in comments to other answers, this is doable but not very effective ...


6

No. The rubber hoods are designed to closely match the lever's shape and are not stretched when installed. There are some third party replacement hoods, but they too are designed to fit specific lever models. If you can't find the correct part locally, there are many mail order shops that have good selection of even uncommon or old spare parts.


6

It's just worth mentioning that there are modern levers that serve the same purpose but are much safer. If you're trying to emulate the setup above you shoudl use the new products. They are known as cyclocross or interrupter levers and are discussed here and here. Other names include crosstop and inline.


6

I found this helpful site which explains the different types and compatibilities: Mechanical bicycle brake compatibility Types of brake levers and calipers These are the brake lever types with their amount of cable pull per full lever travel (about 20 degree angle): V-brake (also known as Direct-pull, or linear-pull), 15 mm ...


6

Shimano recommends a totally different mountain brake levers for the 2-piston XTR brake (the M9100) vs the XTR 4-piston model (the M9120). Why would you need a different brake lever for these different calipers with the same size hose? The key is that there are two brake options available: "race" and "trail". "Race" features 2-pot calipers and lever ...


6

Pull the caps off, that should reveal the standard V-Brake mounts underneath. Often forks come with some kind of plastic protector cap on the mounts to protect them in shipping. Looks like your fork was painted with the caps on to keep paint off the surface the brake mounts on.


5

No, the cable pull is different between 8 speed and 10 speed. You will need to exchange it. There is a detailed explanation here, but the short version is that there are no 8 speed rear derailleurs that are compatible with 10 speed shifters, or vice versa.


5

A lot of people do this, enough that at some points it's been a fashion on fixed gears. All you have to do is put the cable through the normal way with the head resting on the back side of the lever, where it will sit in the housing slot. There are some levers that are made to accommodate the cable head there snugly using a removable plastic bit. The main ...


5

In the interests of closing the question I'll answer it. I took it to a shop and the mechanic managed to pry it out using a tool a little like a screwdriver (but with a pointed end) while applying pressure to the cable.


5

Have a look at Sheldon Brown's handlebar reference. It lists typical clamp and outer bar diameters. Unfortunately it does not contain oversized mountain bike handlebars, like your 31.8 mm riser bar. I suspect that the typical diameter for mountain bike bars at the handles at the grips is still 22.2 mm. You may see in the table that while the clamp diameter ...


5

It functions much the same as a barrel adjuster on a brake lever or caliper. A barrel adjuster will allow the fine adjustments to the tension of control cables. Screwing it out - anti-clockwise - extends the length of the outer-cable run while leaving the length of the inner-cable unaffected. Thus the inner-cable gets tighter... Barrel adjusters are ...


5

You will have no problem with the brake levers. The force you apply to the levers is between your fingers on the lever and the palm of your hand on the bar grip, so the angle of your hand with respect to you body does not matter very much. If you want to convince yourself, sit on your bike, turn the handlebars slightly so the bar is at an angle less than 90°...


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