7

I'm assuming Avid BB7 style brakes and not hydraulic. I wouldn't bring the bike back. If you are using skewers on your hub, remember that any slight mis-alignment of the wheel in the dropouts will affect brake disk squeal. Because the skewers are so easy to reset, as well as its pretty easy to turn the red adjustment knobs on the brakes you might discover ...


6

This isn't necessarily unusual for fresh disc pads. Give it a solid 20 miles. Then if you still have problems coming to a stop, take it to the shop and have them look at it. Even still, it's not necessarily something wrong with their work. It might be, if they were clumsy and didn't align things properly or left oil on the pads. But a little noise isn't ...


5

There are a number of simple things you can do to try improve performance before replacing the brake pads. Check the pads to see how worn they are. Here is an example of a new and worn pad requiring replacing. If the pads don't appear to need replacing you can: Lightly sand the pad with fine sand paper Clean the rotor with isopropyl alcohol (or any non-...


5

Presuming you were thorough with your cleaning and the rotor was left with no residue of any kind (I achieve this on rotors I suspect of being oil or greased contaminated by either using brake cleaner or by finishing with alcohol if I'm using detergent/soap), and also presuming the front caliper isn't having a fluid leak that's causing oil to immediately ...


4

Something is dragging as you pedal harder. The most likely thing is that your rear wheel is moving so that the tire drags against the chain stay when you apply power. This is something that you'll probably need to troubleshoot when you're riding because it isn't likely to show up with the bike on a work stand. You might be able to make it happen by applying ...


3

The screeching that you describe is unlikely to be caused by the tyre skidding. It's more likely to be the contact between the brake pad and the braking surface causing the sound. On an alloy-wheeled rim-brake setup, this is the rubber pad rubbing on the rim. If it's squealing, then it could mean that the surface of the pads has picked up some shards of ...


3

My guess is that your rear end is flexing and either: Rear rim is touching the brake pad, or Tire is rubbing the chainstay With the former, try checking your wheel alignment and loosing your brakes a bit (safely) and testing. With the latter, look for tire rub marks in your chainstay area where the chainstay meets the bottom bracket.


3

I have found before that if you decide to do the quick release up tighter than usual it can tighten up the bearings a little too much and you might hear a fairly regular noise as the wheel rotates. I'm not sure I would call it a 'scratching' noise, but maybe that's it. Try a looser quick release adjustment. If the noise remains the same then you can rule ...


3

I tend to run into the same scenario when I replace my own brake pads on my bike's TRP Spyre mechanical disc brakes. TRP is Tektro's high-end division, and I use Shimano B01S resin pads or anything similarly shaped (TRP says pads for Shimano BR-M515/M575 calipers will fit). The cause of the squealing in my experience is the lack of proper bed-in. Disc ...


3

On my levers I use tight rubber O-rings. I did them myself out of old tube. This levers are easy to disassemble — to get QR pins out just press on them.


2

Is there a chance the rim is wearing out? Have you tried a different wheel? Have you tried toeing the brakes in the opposite direction? It sounds like you've tried just about everything else. I'm leaning towards the wheel being the issue. Otherwise it sounds like the frame is just prone to resonance with the vibration of the brakes. I've got a mtb frame that ...


2

My v-brakes squealed when applied and moaned when riding slow. I tried all of the toe in and out and different pads to no avail. One day I had the front wheel off and notice a very tiny bit of play in the axle. I tightened the bearing cup to snug but the wheel still spun freely. No more noise. Next day I did the same for the rear wheel and now my bike is ...


2

Before I add my two cents here I'll mention that this post is rather old to be unanswered. If you figured this out already write an answer and choose it as "the answer" so it doesn't show up as unanswered and others can learn from it. So, by "play" you could mean front to back (as in the length of the post/bolt) or around the bushing (as in a difference in ...


2

If the sound is occurring once per revolution it must be related to the disc being at least slightly out of true. With the bike off the ground rotate the wheel and look at the disc in the caliper. Check to see if it's touching the pads at any point. You may need to re-adjust the caliper position. I'd be suspicious of a bit of grit or metal stuck in the in ...


2

I have notice the same phenomenon. If you keep washing with clean water the rubbing noise should go away. My best guess is that the water coming off the tires and falling into the brakes brings a fine road grit into the system. This coats the pads/rotors reducing tolerances, causing rubbing to be more noticeable. If it is really wet for a long time, the ...


2

I've heard a wide variety of tire skidding noises over the years. From almost no noise at all to high pitched screeching as you describe. There are a variety of factors that come into play when creating this sound that all relate to the frequency of the sound resulting from a tire sliding over a surface. Tire composition Tire dimensions Tire pressure Road ...


2

If you have carbon rims (with a carbon braking surface) you will need appropriate brake pads, so as not to damage the rims. You do not have to use shimano brake shoes- most (possibly all?) rim brakes will take any brand of shoes. There is a carbon rim insert for Dura Ace, which might fit the ultegra shoes. However if there are no compatible pads for your ...


2

You haven't mentioned checking the caliper alignment. If the pads and disc aren't exactly parallel the braking can feel weak, presumably as the disc is forced sideways by the pads. I've found that it can provide a surprisingly big improvement, and is worth doing when changing the pads. Adjusting the caliper alignment is simple. Park Tool have a great ...


1

According to the Shimano groupset page, both brake options for the Ultegra Di2 6870 groupset (BR-6800, BR-6810) ship with the Shimano R55C4 pads, which are designed for carbon rims. So more than likely, either the brakes are not setup correctly, or the Shimano pads suck.


1

To align the caliper, loosen the caliper bolts and bring the fixed cpad as close as possible to the rotor without rubbing. Then dial in the fixed pad so that it is as close as possible without rubbing. Then install your cable/housing, and begin adjusting. To improve brake feel, pre-stretch your cable before making adjustments. Take the wheel out, out a pad ...


1

It's very common to have play in the pivot bushing and this definitely will make the brake noisier. If the play is between brake and cantilever stud you can make a bushing to take up the play using very thin brass, .001" or .002". Beer can material is way too thick. Just cut a piece the right size and roll it into a cylindrical bushing and finesse it into ...


1

Try wiggling the brake caliper arms from front to back quickly by hand (not in-out like squeezing the brake but inline with the bike frame.) if they wiggle with the tiniest 'thunking' then it sounds like the caliper bushings have worn against the bosses. depending on the nature of the movement, you will either need new bushings in the caliper (usually nylon)...


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