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33

UNITED KINGDOM Intro I ride a 50" Penny-Farthing almost daily on the UK's public roads, both individually and as part of groups in daylight and evening conditions. Before venturing out onto the UK's roads when I began my Penny-Farthing journey, I asked myself this very question. And when people see me on my PF, many will invariably ask me: "Is that ...


24

A coaster brake for the rear comes to mind as a main brake. Refer Sheldon Brown ), however for safety you need more than one brake. A high quality MTB disc brake is designed for low force i.e. single finger for normal use, and high end come with a vast array of lever adjustments so you can get the levers close to the bars to reduce the reach needed. With ...


9

Ideas for avoiding using hands to brake: Coaster brake A coaster brake is a rear brake which you operate by pedalling backwards. Suits urban bikes in flat places very well. Think 'Dutch' bikes. Fit a front brake too in support but use the rear most of the time. Track cycling Velodrome cycling features fixed gear bikes, with no brakes. The speed is controlled ...


8

Although I upvoted @Jedediah 's answer as it's the most comprehensive (and correct) answer, just a few important amplifications from somebody who rides a Penny-Farthing almost daily: Heel on Rear Wheel: Standing on the mount peg and pressing your heel on the rear wheel is actually a fundamental skill all Penny-Farthing riders should have. Indeed, on a Penny-...


7

Rotors can always be cleaned; sometimes you have to use scotch brite or sandpaper, but usually brake cleaner alone will clean them fine. Make sure you clean the areas around the rotor, especially the hub, to make sure the contamination doesn't drip, "sling" or migrate back onto the rotor. The best brake cleaner is perchloroethylene (original red-...


5

If you have to pull hard on the brake lever to get the pads to full engage on the rim, the brake caliper is not adjusted properly. Rim brakes can only generate stopping force when both pads are applying opposing 'gripping' forces to the rim. New bike should be set up correctly, if you bought from a dedicated bicycle store take it back and and ask for the ...


5

In addition to a coaster brake on the back, there are solutions to allow both hands to operate the same brake. Problem Solvers make one that goes inline, and JTek have one that goes on the brake. These could perhaps provide a front brake if you have sufficient strength on both hands combined. These are for cable brakes; I'd use them with disc- or V-brake, ...


3

If I understood your question, you may want to look into internally geared hubs, it seems they are exactly what you are looking for. I thought they were fairly popular, so I would be surprised if you really have not come across these - so I am sorry if I missed the point. A landmark feature of gear hubs is that you can change gear while stationary - it ...


3

Assuming you have eliminated contamination of pads or rotor as the cause you can consider a different calliper. The bike spec on the website lists the brake spec as “Mechanical disc with alloy 3 finger levers.” A drop in replacement might be an Avid BB7 or BB5 or Shimano BR-M375 calliper which might improve the strength of the brake without needing to figure ...


3

Have you tried hydraulic disk brakes? They use a lot less force for braking, because most of the force of a cable-brake goes into stretching the cable. Also the power of the disk brake counts a lot: the more powerful it is, the less pressure is required to activate it. Also, note that reclining two-wheelers and trikes are worth having a go on, they give you ...


2

This is a judgement call depending on the kid, the terrain, and the bike. My kids have balance bikes with no brakes at all. We don't ride them in hills or traffic. These bikes are a good way to learn how to steer and balance in a controlled environment. My kids later graduated to fixed gear bikes with a front brake only. I consider the fixed gear to be "...


2

I think I'd wash them with plenty of soapy warm water but I think they could be already contaminated. I'd wash them and replace as soon as you're able to as a precautionary measure


1

I think you should try a bleed. We could go back and forth all day about what could be causing the problem, but it will all be moot until we have ruled out air in the hydraulic system. I had a pair of brakes (only one actually) that one day just went totally slack. Literally fine one moment, and dead the next. I was convinced there was a leak. Why else ...


1

I had the same idea as you, but the cost do this properly by a bike fitter was 500 pounds. You also have to think about the reach from the seat to the brake lever. So from a safety point of view I would say it's a no no.


1

Had the same problem, used a pot scrub cleaner for stainless steel on the rims - got rid of the squeak.


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