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22

It's hard to say exactly what the cause is, but I see two main possibilities: Mechanical causes Brake pads. If the pads are very close to the rotor when at rest, and have minimal motion to close on the rotor then that may be enough to wedge them. Try inspecting the brake pads and if worn, replace them. Brake pads are consumable. Thin brake pad ...


10

Don't - its dangerous ( Majority of braking force comes from front brakes) and in many countries illegal to ride on the road without 2 operational brakes. Likely you are using too much force and not enough control. You need to learn to feather brakes rather than jam them on, while shifting the weight back and lower. Another possibility is you are using ...


9

Adjusting the pads is a normal part of maintenance for mechanical disc bikes. I have a tektro mechanical e-Bike that is ridden with rider+cargo > 200lbs 8 mi/day with 4 steep (> 50 meter elevation change exceeding 20% grade) hills. I move the adjuster for the moving pad in one "click" weekly when filling tires and readjust the static pad monthly. I ...


9

It is unusual to see a hydraulic brake described as on/off, as they are usually well known for their modulation. However I have had an experience of this before with a friends bike. He was regularly locking up the rear wheel, and initially I put it down to inexperience as a new rider - until I rode the bike myself and found the brake to be extremely '...


9

In the USA at least you can take a bike back to the store you bought it from and ask for problems to be addressed. However I googled 'Giordano Acciao' and I'm guessing you got this bike from Amazon or a department store, so that's likely not an option for you. no offense meant, but bikes from Amazon, Walmart or department stores are the lowest quality and ...


6

Entry level bikes are designed to be sold at a price point. What this means is, the parts are spec'd out to at least be functional at the lowest possible cost. In your case the brakes were the parts that are the least functional. They still work, but not great. The good news is that the brake pads are one of the cheapest upgrades you can make. With a minimum ...


4

In general I've found tektro brakes to need a lot of tweaking (V as well as mechanical disc). With discs this can be minimised by getting the fixed pad as close as you can without it dragging. If your rotor is bent this won't be as close as it should be Sintered pads are definitely better for loads+hills; it's important to bed them in but they don't glaze. ...


4

Different brake pads have different amounts of "grab." You may consider changing the type of brake pad you use in your disc brake. Sintered or metallic pads are generally considered to have less initial "bite" than organic pads.


4

To answer the last part of your question: yes, ABS systems for bicycles exist (a quick searching of the Internet is enough to see that). However, they are not widespread and are mostly for OEM city bikes where there are no expectations about rider's skills. As a result, maybe not something readily available for an end user to buy. In absence of ABS, and ...


3

This sort of component-level repair is rare in cycling. Generally speaking a shop would fit a new replacement brake lever and clamp. Moving sub-components around would be the realm of someone valuing a period-correct part over functionality. I'd replace both brake levers with either new or a good quality used replacement. Why both? So they feel the same ...


3

This feels like something is not quite correct with the front brake. Sorry, I've missed if you've provided the make/model, but theoretically, modern hydraulic disc brakes should allow complete modulation through the braking phase rather than an all or nothing approach. That suggests contamination, sticking piston(s) or calipers, etc. You could also check ...


3

How much do you consume the pads? If they wear too much you will simillar braking power but you will need to pull the lever closer and closer to the handlebars. Measure the thickness of the brake pads after you cleaned them and then after their power vanishes. Exceeding wear: Your brakes are too weak for your style and riding profile. No wear: Your disc and ...


3

Tiny metal fragments from the rims embedded in the brake pads is fairly common, although the amount you have in yours looks excessive to me. The rims may have not been machined very well and had poor surface finish which lead to the high level of contamination of the pads. As the rims wear in this should decrease. You don't want to leave all those bits of ...


2

If you've been replacing pads, but not rotors (only cleaning them) then you could just not be cleaning the contamination of the rotor, therefor continuously contaminating the pads. That being said a 160mm rotor with a mechanical disc brake with a heavy bike is probably a lot more demanding on those brakes than they were intended for. Having a larger rotor ...


1

I would try replacing the rotors. They could be contaminated with something that the alcohol won't fix. That would then in turn contaminate the pads, which would explain why sanding and replacing pads has only a temporary reprieve from your issues.


1

It could be an easy fix, or a new brake. Are you prepared to trash your travel plans over the cost of new brakes? Given the time frame, I would either hand it over to my LBS, or put on a new brake and sort it out when I got home. Time frame for sourcing a new brake means any hiccups and you won't have time to sort it unless you buy from your LBS. Your best ...


1

I was successfully able to repair this loss. It required the following items that fell off the brompton rear brake bolt: 2x concave washers 1x spring washer 1x M6 flat washer 1x Brompton Rear Brake Nut (RBNUT), including a flat washer and nut Note that I have a 2016 M6R Berry Crush Brompton Black Edition. The LSD on this bicycle is the Mk3 variety, as ...


1

If you really want disc brakes, it's new bike time. If you are replacing the forks, at least half the drivetrain and the wheels (you need disc brake hubs, and if you need to replace hubs then you really need to replace the wheels), then with installation costs you will likely be paying a very significant fraction of a decent new bike. Even a lowish level ...


1

I find the v-brake on the front fork, which often times has just one hole for the spring pin, is a smoother install. Idk why. There is no difference in "front" or "rear" v-brakes except the direction of the pads. Typically at the rear, the frame's tabs where the brake bosses are threaded or brazed on will have three holes per side drilled in them from ...


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