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22

While specific shopping comparison questions are off-topic here due to their tendency to become obsolete, there is a perfectly good generic question here where these two bikes can be used as examples, so I will take that angle on it. The two bikes in question have similar price points, but the braking system on the disc one is eating a lot more of the price ...


16

In my opinion it is actually safer to bring the setup you are used to even if it theoretically might be less optimal on the other side of the road. Such a difference is very small. Sometimes you have to indicate to the left and sometimes to the right anyway. When I lived in the UK for 2 years I had problems getting used to the reversed brakes and I was more ...


10

I'm going to focus solely on the issue of mechanical disc versus rim brakes. All else equal, I would prefer rim brakes to mechanical disc. Mechanical disc brakes (and the hubs, and possibly the frame as well due to increased manufacturing complexity) are more expensive than rim brakes. This means that if the bikes have the same price, then the one with disc ...


10

In addition to all the points Jeff is talking about in his answer, there may be a simple mismatch between your brake lever and the brake: V-brakes require the brake lever to actually pull the cable a fair distance, much more than other brake systems require. As such, if you combine a V-brake with a lever intended for some short pull brake, you will simply ...


7

I am British living in Spain, and I ride my British bike here, so have some experience. I agree with others that you are probably best advised to ride the bike you are used to. If there are any regulations, I have not seen any signs of their enforcement in over 10 years of cycling here. I just wanted to add that the hardest things to master are looking over ...


7

It's about distance, not force. Coil housing is not at all impaired in its ability to transmit force once any distance between its coils has been taken up (so no to your second question.) On any rim brake that doesn't have egregious bends, the practical difference between compressionless and coil housing is marginal. It's a little stiffer and more responsive ...


6

Not going to do anything, unless the bike weighs 300 lbs or something. Worst case if you're hanging and removing repeatedly you could scuff the paint, from the housing rubbing against the frame. But of course, your mounts pose the same risks.


5

There are a few possible reasons why you're experiencing poor braking performance of a v-brake system. You relate that at least one side's pads are close to the braking surface already. Are the two sides balanced? Are the pads at a start point from the rim that is the same distance--which should be 2mm or a little less. If pad spacing is unbalanced, the ...


4

No, the stopping distance is not just traction limited - or at least not just by the wheel/road surface combination. Even if you can block your wheel with your rim brakes and get the wheel slipped, you might be able to stop faster with better modulation when you actually avoid the slip. The consistency in breaking in the disc brakes helps to predict the ...


4

In a static situation, and with the same force applied to the lever, in all likelihood the ultimate braking force will be the same between compressionless and regular housing. But that's only part of the story. Housing compression essentially adds an element of "spring" or slack to the system. This extra amount of spring could cause a few different ...


4

This is quite a wide-ranging question with a number of points raised. Regarding the specific question of mechanical vs. sidepull, I can only agree with the previous commenters that you are likely to get better value and experience from the sidepull brakes, from my experience they are much easier to keep 'in tune' than disk brakes and will almost certainly ...


4

If you do it often it could scratch the frame’s paint or damage the cable over time. I don’t think it will have any other ill effects. It’s basically the same as if you’d set the cable length or tension a few millimeters too short. You could unhook the cable at the brake (no need to open the clamping screw). Why don’t you hang it from the saddle?


3

The gap depicted for your Shimano brakes appears to be of similar dimension to a couple Shimano systems I run. The spacing is very close and I'm often truing the rotors to ride rub free. Shimano hydraulic brakes are self-adjusting in relation of the pad to the rotor, so that when the pad wears, the spacing stays the same. Bed your new brakes in properly ...


3

Bicycles are made so that when making a turn signal, one can brake on the hand not occupied making the turn signal with the primary brake, BUT with incorrect assumption what the primary brake is. The incorrect assumption is that the primary brake is the rear brake. Thus on the right driving countries, the rear brake is on the right (because you make left-...


3

I am a maker of custom bikes for kids and small adults. I am a heavy user of the interrupter-style levers, even for main brake levers. The main reason that I use them is that they are easy to adapt to a custom bracket which fits smaller-diameter handlebars and smaller hands. Another great benefit, they are some of the lightest levers available, period, at as ...


2

There is a unifying theme with bleeding Tektro and similar brakes: disregard the written procedures, don't trust the contents of any bleed kit to give you what you need, aggressively modify the kit parts, and make up your own rules. I follow manufacturer instructions faithfully when they work, like for Shimano, but for the Tektros and Promaxes of the world, ...


2

I'm only going to answer an aspect of your question; you can apply it to your brake how you wish. Firstly, Certain Tekro models are fiddly to bleed but also feel like they need bleeding if the pads are worn down, so if you haven't put new pads in, I suggest you do that first. When something like this comes into a commercial workshop and this amount of time ...


2

It appears that is some kind of fancy CNC'd aluminum ferrule. If so it might be a little chunkier than a regular one and randomly be able to encounter fit issues. If that is the case, assuming you're using normal spiral housing, all you have to do is get a normal plated brake ferrule like the one you had and you should be fine. If you're using ...


2

Choose a brake system from a top manufacturer. Sram, Shimano, Hope, Magura etc. Judge the pricing that fits your budget and check availability. See if reviews exist for the brakes you like. All the top manufacturers have excellent reliability and serviceability now. Your rotors should be fine if not too worn, they are standard sizes.


1

Often this is the result of poor "toe-in." As the wheel turns while braking, the brake pads' mounting posts flex slightly and the pads buck against the rim and bounce back, causing the squeal you're experiencing. The fix is to adjust the brake pads so the frontmost end of the pad is slightly closer to the rim. This makes it so that the pad is ...


1

It doesn't matter per se. This kind of question elicits all manner of opinions and pseudo-facts about what is or isn't best. Personally, I don't really signal when I'm braking, and I don't brake when I'm signalling. You should be planning ahead and positioning your bike to give other road users a clue. Turning right? use the right hand side of the lane. ...


1

Personally, I miss some questions that I would consider first: Will your own bike be the only one that you ride, and you the only rider of your bike, or will you borrow local bikes resp. lend yours to locals? Do you plan to stay for a longer period of time, or is it likely that you will move back before you get accustomed to the "reversed" brake ...


1

In some countries there are very strong rules (or maybe even laws) about which brake lever handles which brake. In other countries it is up to the bike factory or bike shop. This has resulted in my mother having the brakes reversed on her (then) new bike and the bike shop did switch them as soon as asked. When I bought a new bike I asked the bike shop to ...


1

Even with compressionless housing the best housing should still be kept the shortest possible. Even compression-free housing unless it consists of non-compressible metal beads will still have residual compression. This will carry as much as possible of the force applied to the cable to the callipers. From the front-lever to the brake, there isn't obviously ...


1

I can only speak to #1 "Can it decrease the braking efficiency of the main levers?" Yes, it might, but not a certainty though. The amount of impact depends on the quality of your installation. Any join in the outer cable could allow compression, and cumulatively add toward sponginess in your brake lever. Also if the interrupter lever has a firm ...


1

Good mechanical disc brakes (e.g. Avid BB7) can be very good indeed - plenty of stopping power, pads last for thousands of kilometers, not affected by weather. However, I've had varied experiences with cheaper mech discs, such as some Shimano models. The biggest problem seems to be a lack of stopping power when used with drop-bar levers (even though these ...


1

I just got my front brake of the same model bled to a point where I'm happy. There's still a bit of sponginess, but the bike will stop. A few tips I found helpful: As Nathan said, put zip ties on all barb fittings. The tubing slipped off a barb twice before I smartened up and slapped some zip ties on there. Time to clean up two puddles of oil now...grrrrrrr ...


1

If your frame lacks disk brake mounts now, then give up this idea, and look for a second/replacement bike or frame. There were dangerous "accessories" that provided brake mounts on frames bereft of them, but the frames weren't engineered for those loads and could fail. Likewise, adding mounts was no guarantee of success either. Example - this is a ...


1

If you're already planning on replacing your front fork, you should consider switching to disc brakes on at least the front. Disc brake mounts are now standard on suspension forks and it can be difficult to even find a fork with V brake mounts. Be sure to keep an axle-to-crown distance and fork travel similar to that of your current fork, or you'll end up ...


1

You need to have the appropriate mounts on the fork, the rear of the frame, and you need hubs that can accept disc rotors. My understanding is that some older MTB frames and forks had mounts for both V- and disc brakes. This was when the industry was starting to shift towards disc brakes. While I'm not familiar with MTBs, that might have been in the early ...


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