New answers tagged

3

I test-rode a trike that had a parking brake lever. There was an extra button underneath the housing and when you pull the lever, it clicked in and holds brake lever locked down. To release parking brake, you squeeze the lever a bit more and the button pops out. The brake is to help you load your cargo with the trike not rolling away. https://www....


0

A long time leader and innovator in rim brake materials is KoolStop. Kool Stop makes a variety of "Smooth Post Cantilever" pad holder that should fit your application. They even make replacement pads for your original holders. I personally would use a modern holder with a modern pad compound. It will give superior performance over the older stock ...


3

Mechanical disc calipers typically have an external lever which is pulled by the cable to move the pads onto the rotor. You can try using something like a zip tie to pull and fix the lever. You can also just wind in the barrel adjuster on the cable but you’d need to re-adjust the caliper when you release it.


4

Assuming you have cable operated brakes, the basic answer is you have to detach the cables at the brake calipers, and pull the cables out of the housings through the levers. The levers hold the cable via a boss swaged onto the end of the cable, so that’s the only way to get the cables out. You can then switch which levers the the front and housing rear ...


2

It may be quick and easy with free running cables, although I'd get suitable new cables before starting the work. They're easier to install than trying to re-install used ones. While you're at it also check the housings. It may be cheaper to buy a set that comes with all the bits and small parts required than get separate items. It will be more difficult and ...


2

I hope readers pardon the length of this answer, but it does raise some interesting questions about the performance of ceramic rim brake rims. This is not exactly an issue of cosmic importance. While there is reason to think that ceramic (or similarly coated) rims should reduce stopping distance, many riders don't routinely ride in the wet, experience can ...


2

I've had Mavic rims with Ceramic braking surfaces - They are brilliant, far better braking power - especially when wet and they last forever. I'm unsure why they work better in the wet - but they are significantly better in the wet and the dry too. Thoroughly recommended. Shame they stopped doing them.


5

Work the lever and check that that the caliper is moving - that will tell you that the cable is attached and has not broken. Make sure the little lever on the caliper that spreads the pads to let the wheel come out of the bike isn't engaged Inspect the cable run from lever to caliper, make sure the housing is properly inserted into the lever and all frame ...


1

A framebuilder could do this in a sound way. The best approach is to do as much as possible cold, i.e. cut off the bulk of the posts and work the area back down to smooth with files and then sanding. For the most part, it sounds like a giant hassle that accomplishes little and is founded on the misconception that cantis aren't good brakes. One exception to ...


0

I'm sure you've confirmed that you have mounting points for caliper brakes, right? Cutting off the canti bosses with a hacksaw will leave remnants that are not an improvement, aesthetically. Getting the remnants smoothed out will take a lot of filing and sanding, but it can be done. Assuming the canti bosses were brazed on, they could be removed with the ...


0

I'm planning to get the frame resprayed. Maybe this isn't such a great idea, but I'm wondering about having the cantilever braze-ons removed, in order to use callipers instead. If you want function over looks, remove the cantilever brakes, leave the posts there and cover the cantilever posts with epoxy. Since epoxy is less durable than steel, it is very ...


2

This is common practice and many DIY types do that. The problem for the shop is that by doing to work they become liable for the result, and if something does go wrong the general result is that your face hits the road, hard. That's expensive almost regardless of the details, and no bike shop wants to take the rsik. Partly because a replacement fork already ...


3

Noise after hard braking is normal. The rotor heats up and warps slightly. When you got rubbing after reinserting the wheel, that shows you didn't align the wheel correctly. You need to be applying as much downwards force as possible while tightening the QR in order to seat the axle in the dropouts. The one-sided force from tightening a QR skewer tends to ...


4

Currently, TRP Hylex are one of the only drop bar brake lever (without gears) that has a hyraulic master cylinder. Magura HS66 is another, but these are pretty rare. Other options include: Cable actuated hydraulic calipers. These are connected by cables just like normal caliper but the hydralic master cyclinder is at the caliper end, so any drop lever ...


3

Ok this is exciting, I called around locally bikes owned bikes shops and asked if they had some scrap parts laying around. One of them had a Shimano SLX m7000 left brake assembly. I paid for the part and disassembled the lever. It is an exact fit. So, you can take a blade from the m7000 hydraulic series and put it on the newest m8100 hydraulic series! Fits ...


2

There is currently only the TRP Hylex.


2

Here you go, the Shimano XT 12s brake lever. It's roughly 17mm


6

This is one of the generations of Shimano single pivot sidepull brakes where the layout of what fasteners do what is different from the more common type that has two nuts like you mention. The pivot adjustment procedures do not translate at all. For this brake, the wrench flats you see on top of the brake arms are integral to the pivot bolt. Or in other ...


0

Your initial issue you state is that your rear brake pads wear out "too quickly". With bikes there is no hard and fast rule as to which should wear out first. In a car the weight of the occupants has little or no bearing on how the brakes wear. The vehicle weight will shift as it will while breaking as the occupants are a small amount of the total weight ...


0

It's pretty simple and only requires an Allen wrench. Loosen with the Allen wrench from where it's attached in the back of the post, recenter the brakes, and tighten. You can fine-adjust from each caliper's side-screw if needed, but you may not need to. A bit more detail in the middle minute of this video (linked from this article.)


1

As Philip says, there are indicators available for bikes; a rear-view mirror wouldn't go amiss either. However, I don't have either on my race bike. In the situation you describe I would indicate really early, then put the hand back on (depending on how steep/fast), while setting up for the corner, scrubbing my speed nice and early, then another quick ...


7

Do a 2 stage turn manoeuvre. or I do this often when traffic is too important.


1

Get an electronic turning signal indicator and use that to signal. Claim the center of the auto lane so that even inattentive drivers should be aware of your presence. Eye contact with the driver behind you, in your mirror perhaps, sounds like a good idea if possible; in any case have an escape plan in mind if the following vehicle fails to keep distance ...


3

Never ever risk your stability and complete control of your bike in going downhill, much less take one hand off the handlebar even for a second when you may need to brake strongly on a steep slope. It's a recipe for disaster even for highly experienced bikers. You can't beat physics, this is all about vehicle dynamics and you want to stay safe. If you lose ...


0

Cable housing cutter - Looks to me like this is a fancy wire stripper. Is there anything about brake housing cables that I need to know that would make using a sharp wire stripper problematic? As a few other respondents have already said; if you only get one of the three tools you've listed get one of these or an equivalent from another brand. The curved ...


2

Your main question is this: Is it safe to just brake with my left hand on a steep hill? It depends on the conditions. If you have an icy, or slushy, downhill, then you should probably avoid using the front brake at all and make sure you have a long deceleration using back brake primarily. If it's normal conditions and you need to brake, your front brake ...


1

Skimming across previous answers, I don't see any reference to how your brake cables are orientated. i.e. does your left hand activate the rear brake and your right hand active the front or vice versa? As an Aussie and sympathetic 'keeping on the left' cycle user I'm cognisant of your problem as described. Just like driving on the left or driving on the ...


1

I think the most important thing is that you don’t do anything unexpected. Suddenly cutting across a lane because you are too scared to look behind and indicate is unexpected and you are rightfully concerned about doing that. If you have to slow down before you feel confident to look behind you and signal with your hand, do so very gradually. No sudden, ...


8

As a cyclist in the UK your use of the bicycle on the road is governed by the Highway Code. You are not required to use hand signals, because it is acknowledged both hands are required for operating the bike safely. In the event you cannot use hand signals, make other road users aware of your intention through eye contact, body position on the bike, road ...


3

Might I also add that for me (15 years plus commuting), I find that travelling on a bicycle in traffic at rush hour is very different to travelling on an empty road, largely because very often the traffic (cars) are not moving. If this is a busy route, you may well find that you are going to be negotiating your way through a queue of stationary traffic as ...


10

I've literally never braked one handed so it kind of terrifies me. It is terrific for a reason and you have to practice somewhere safe. If you hold the front set with only one hand and do brake, your body momentum will try to turn the front wheel. If you don't counter this movement, you'll fall or get where you don't intend to.


4

There is no shame to stop and walk the difficult/dangerous bit. Actually, it is stupid not doing so and risking too much when one is not confident. With expirience goes confidence. Now you need to stop and walk the crossection everytime. In a month you will stop only because really heavy trafic, then because of slippery road, later you will do the turn ...


0

I wonder if frame builder could "fill in" that hole with braze, and then drill a new brake hole horizontally-ish for a more modern brake? If there's not enough meat, or if the brake bridge is too high then the frame may need a replacement brake bridge brazed on in a more-conventional place slightly lower down. A third option might be to rotate that "hook" ...


29

As an confident road rider I'd do two major things. I'd turn my head, look backward and make eye contact with the driver(s) just behind me to show intention, and maybe signal at this point. Or I might not signal at all. Then take the lane. You will be moving fast enough to slot-in with the cars because of the downhill. I'd avoid being sidelined on the ...


16

Firstly, congrats on both posting for the first time and for deciding to commute on a bike! Many of us commute on bikes in the UK and everyone started somewhere! If you're not 100% confident with ANY part of your journey, you should just stop, walk the challenging bit, and then get on your bike again to continue. There is absolutely no shame in doing that, ...


1

I'm about 95% sure that is a proprietary part for this frame, not a Mafac part. Mafac adapter plates exist for standard orientation holes. It appears that at some point someone added a wood screw in place of a proper bolt. I imagine the original intention was for this to be installed with a concave washer hugging either side of the bridge. For what it's ...


-2

All these tools are professional and you shouldn't have them, but you don't need anything but better pliers to replace them once or twice a year. You buy a cable to measure, etc.


1

Burning them with a lighter and sand fairly vigorously with sandpaper seemed to help enormously.


5

The best approach I've seen in terms of producing non-mediocore results is heat them up with a heat gun until you can see the oil smoking up and maintain that heat until the smoke stops. You want to heat it through and minimize peak temperature, so let that inform your setting and distance. This can work pretty well but I make no promises what the ...


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