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Most likely, you don't have enough tension in the cable to start with. Loosen the cable-fixing bolt on the brake, and pull through enough cable so that the pads are within a few mm of the rim. Other possibilities to investigate: You haven't replaced the "noodle"--the curved guide that routes the cable from one brake arm to the other. It needs to ...


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Slide the threaded ferrule away from the end and you should see that the gold-colored insert is pressed into the end of the tube. It pulls out but you may find it difficult to remove since it's barbed. If needed, carefully split the tubing to remove it. Heating the assembly to soften the tubing can also make removal easier. I think it's best NOT to reuse ...


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Brake fade under excess heating is absolutely a thing - when your brakes get too hot their ability to decrease your speed will reduce. Doesn't matter if you've got disks, rim brakes, a drum brake, a roller brake, a coaster, rod brakes or a spoon brake, they all loose performance as the temperatures rise. A Long Paved descent is no different. As a rider you ...


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In a world without atmosphere you would be correct. However in the real world short and hard braking has several advantages: You spend more time at high speed before you brake, so you lose more energy to aerodynamic drag which increases with velocity cubed. (the power increases with velocity cubed, the force with velocity squared) The surface of the brake ...


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I'm working around the assumption that you are on a aluminium rim. My opinion is that as long as there's no loss in braking power / consistency, then your braking componentry should still be fine. Cleaning of components I would clean my rim and brake pads with warm soapy water. It gets rid of any surface oils or residue from the roads. An inconsistent ...


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I am going to assume you have the more recent Saint brakes, BR-M820. A true blockage in a ceramic-piston Shimano brake such as yours that occurs when fluid should be able to flow through as per the bleed procedure is usually a sign that a piece of the ceramic piston has broken off. This is often accompanied by erratic brake feel or function being the symptom ...


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Now you're in a fine mess. Putting water in your brake system has most certainly been the death sentence through even minimal corrosion or material incompatibility, ruined the cylinders, the lines and the gaskets. Taking the levers apart will not improve things as most parts will need replacing to be reliably functional again. Think of ordering a whole new ...


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*Shifted from the follow-up post: Are road mechanical disc brakes safe to pair with a steel gravel bike Disclaimer: It's not unsafe in my experience but I am unsure how safe this setup is, so perform this at your own risk. Some manufacturers advise against this for certain brake models (i.e. TRP's hybrid hydraulics/mechnaical brake - some content creator on ...


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My first thought is that you were pairing road levers with mountain brakes. If the levers pull relatively little cable, but the brakes are designed for a lot of cable travel, you'll have bad results, as Michael mentioned. However, it's also possible that you've just got bad brakes (you don't say what they are). If the force you put into the brake levers is ...


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I will assume that they're compatible, i.e. that the brake calipers are a road model. Pad choice is not part of the equation in determining bite point or lever travel. Its influence on power is primarily under sustained heavy braking, and since more aggressive pads have downsides in terms of noise and rotor wear, you should usually only go to them when you ...


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Edit: Per your other question you have Microshift Advent X STI style shifters. I assume it’s the ADVENT X Drop Bar Shifters 1x10 SB-M100A. You also mention Tektro MD-C510 disc brake calipers. Both brifters and calipers have the usual road brake cable pull. So it can’t be an incompatibility. On the internet one can read a lot of complaints about the Tektro ...


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Squeaking brakes can help take our focus off the road. To completely stop squeaking, check these items: Before you start fixing, ensure that the wheels are suitably planted in the dropouts or chainstays. Check for is the caliper’s alignment. You should constrict/tighten the caliper nuts evenly. Slowly spin the wheel and observe if there’s rubbing. If ...


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I am presuming its very slight rubbing that is not noticeably affecting the wheels free rotation. What type of bike? FS MTB, super light roadie? Worn bushes or light flexible frame may cause a small amount of auditable rubbing under load. The loss of energy form this is tiny, and as long as its only happening under cornering (when energy loss is occurring ...


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The rotor should be flat and co-planar with the hub mounting face, which should be at a right angle to the axle's center line. Replacing the rotor won't fix issues with the axle or play in the bearings, so check those out before buying parts. I've used a dial travel indicator to get a rotor completely orthogonal to the axle, and still had rub because the ...


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Edited - Missed that he brakes are Saint. I have had this occur with a different brand of hydraulic disc. The lever has a valve that closes when the lever is pulled in, sealing the system so the hydraulic pressure builds and drives the pads, and opens when the lever is released, allowing the system to balance as things like heat cause fluid to expand. In my ...


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