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4

Did you bed the new pads in? It wouldn’t hurt to clean the rotor with isopropyl, then, one brake at a time, in an area without traffic, slow the bike from about 15 miles per hour to a near stop. You want to apply steady, firm pressure to the brake, without coming to a complete stop or locking the wheel. Expect at least 10 and as many as 30 repetitions per ...


15

Render R's are very susceptible to the arm being over-actuated. They don't hit a physical stop like some of their peers, but they reach a point where the cable anchor location is hanging in space and can't be pulled anymore. That you can't get good power even braking from the drops suggests this is the problem. Detach the cable. Set the barrel adjuster all ...


4

those calipers are weak. Ultimately you may wish to replace them, but first: Are the brakes bedded in? Follow a disc brake bedding in procedure (8 hard braking efforts from speed but not completely stopping). You could try compressionless cable housing if not already fitted. It makes a noticeable difference. You could try metallic compound pads if the disc ...


3

First of all, make sure the cable housing and cable is seated properly everywhere. Even then it can be tricky to get the noodle back in and it can require quite some force to compress everything far enough. If it’s just a matter of a few millimeters: You should have a barrel adjuster at the brake lever (marked C in the photo below) or at the brake. Unless it’...


1

We used Sta-Lube Moly-Graph Grease and it seems very similar to the Shimano Grease.


0

Based on the second photo, I'd guess the rotor is no longer parallel to the brake caliper. Thus instead of having flat contact between the pads and the rotor like =| |x| |= you now have smaller area of contact. =/ |x| /= Sanding the pads has rounded them off a little, increasing the area of contact a little. The best fix I can come up with is re-aligning ...


9

I talked to Canyon's support and they have clarified that apparently it's an error.


2

As I said in a comment under another answer, you may well have very well degreased those sections, on a rim that had traces of stubborn grease even when apparently clean (either from road grime or chain lube getting flicked at it). Another possibility is that by stripping the anodising off the rim you've revealed the far softer aluminium underneath. This ...


5

When I was into freestyle BMX in the early 2000s, we had a few tricks to improve braking. Much of the tricks were designed, like in the case of trials, toward having brakes that can be locked up solid with the least amount of effort so that you can consistently lock them up with 1 finger. So modulation was not usually a goal. First of all, contrary to the ...


2

Sadly braking at the rear wheel is relatively poor because of a combination of factors. Kid's hand strength - your average 4 year old can't squeeze the lever as hard as a larger rider. This affects braking at both wheels. The brake lever's pull ratio is also often sized for a full sized brake so it has to move through a certain angle to pull enough cable ...


-1

This is a single pivot sidepull brake. They have a flaw in the centering spring that makes the brakes center unevenly. Because of this flaw, single pivot sidepull brakes are made with low mechanical advantage so that the brake pads have enough room to retract, in an uneven manner. The best fix for your problem would be to find a single pivot sidepull brake ...


2

This obviously depends on the location on where you ride, whether or not your bike happens to be a fixed gear bike (most are not), whether or not the laws consider the ability to backpedal on a fixed gear bike a brake device. This could also depend on the specifics of the bicycle. The lawmakers obviously don't want everyone riding on bicycles with only one ...


1

I have a Dawes Super Galaxy touring bike with cantilever brakes, and I'm a bit worried about the stopping power of the brakes when I start loading the bike up with kit to go touring. Don't be worried. Unlike single pivot sidepull calipers that suffer from uneven centering, or dual pivot sidepulls that cannot track a wobbly wheel due to forced centering, ...


7

Cantis are good brakes and can work really well. Their downside is a little more fiddliness to set up. Some things to check: Brake pads - if they are over 5 years old, just replace them. Brake pads/blocks get hard with age and don't function as well. If they're pretty new, clean out any embedded metal with a sharp pick. Can do this on the bike if you ...


7

Pad quality makes a huge difference on rim brakes. While the spares you have may be better than the old pads, they're still going to be far worse than a good pad, especially in the wet. I have a BSO with early V-brakes that take canti pads, and have been pleased with these Kool Stop Eagle 2 dual compound. The dual compund (soft and hard) is key to all-...


3

The best option would probably be to change to (Mini) V-Brakes, at least for the front. For touring you probably also want to change the rear brake. If I’m not mistaken the Shimano Sora brake levers are of the short pull type and need Mini V-Brakes (e.g. XLC BR-V04 or TRP CX8.4). Their only disadvantage compared to Cantilevers is that they have less ...


3

The single pivot sidepull design requires a fairly wide pad gap at the rim in order for centering to not be too finicky. It's essentially the widest of all common rim brake designs. This is due to the spring design's two sliding contacts, as Jobst Brandt writes about here. The contacts are hard to keep at the exact same level of friction, and any disparity ...


0

Isn’t the dual pivot design in fact creating a longer arm? Just look how long the brake arm of the right (in the photo) brake pad is. From the left attachment point all the way to the right pivot. All this without a long arm sticking out sideways or compromising tire clearance (by making the other arm shorter). What has me a bit confused is that the ...


-1

There is a technical reason. Single pivot brakes had a faulty centering spring. The springs cannot be made from a single unbent piece of wire because it would bend too much. Instead, the springs are made from a wire that has a loop in mid-air. As this loop is not in the pivot point but rather in mid-air, in the location where the centering spring touches the ...


-2

Dual-pivot brakes move the pad to the rim quickly, with low mechanical advantage (pivoting around pivot 1), and then switch to pressing the pad against the rim more slowly, with high mechanical advantage (pivoting around pivot 2). This gives you the best of both worlds.


6

There is a good chance that mix of soaps is leaving a residue on the rotors and that is collecting on the pads and fouling them. If that soap residue is your problem, then it's also possible that the heat from use is helping performance, but it's not burning the soap away completely. Whenever you're having a problem with brake power or excessive noise, the ...


4

Although this question is the first I've heard of Rhino Goo, upon doing a little online research it seems anyone who uses the stuff simply raves at it's power and looks of their ride after using it. Apparently it's Earth friendly and will not harm paint. Anecdotal reports of it's use on hydraulic brake calipers mention only it's outstanding performance and ...


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