22

Don't use cable stops. The biggest load those stops will ever see is when you grab your brakes hard for an emergency stop. So you're likely to find out that whatever you did to bond the stops to the frame wasn't strong enough or fatigue-resistant enough at the absolute worst possible time. And you'll never be able to know if your work is fatigue-resistant ...


17

Beside a professionally done welding, clamp-on cable stops should be a reasonably reliable solution.


12

One difference that internal cables make is if you transport your bike by car or have to haul it around by hand. Because the cables are inside the frame, they are less likely to get pinched by the clamp on your car-mount (especially if you use a trunk mount that clamps the top-tube). This is also true for car/bus bike mounts that clamp the down tube. If you ...


11

spiraled brake housing would compress when shifting which would diminish the accuracy and using lengthwise cables for brakes can't handle the stress and split wherever the tension is too great. this article explains as much: https://www.pinkbike.com/news/To-The-Point-Shift-Cables-2013.html


9

Fourth hand cable stretcher - I think this is one tool I'll need to get, or something similar. I see Pedro's makes a version of it, I'm not sure if it's made as solidly or not. What should I look for when buying one of these? Never found I needed one, typically I pull the inner brake cable as far as possible then close the brake calipers all the way (i.e., ...


9

You do not really need the housing functionally, the bowden runs straight between two fixed points. There is nothing that could compress or deform. It just works well as is. You only could add it as a mechanical protection but it is not customary and could add some additional unnecessary friction.


9

Racier bikes do it above all because it's weight that can be taken away. That may sound trifling, but you get to a light bike by marginal gains in lots of little places. On other bikes it's about the compromise between squish and contaminant ingress. Interrupted housing gives more entry points to water and dirt. So it needs to be replaced more and can be ...


8

There is a proper tool that is probably the best solution. They cut so that it does not smash the ends or the metal inside of the housing. Many also have an awl in order to help reform the end if any smashing or deformation does occur. Most look something like this: It is also possible with a brand new razor blade but the proper plier like tool makes it a ...


8

Not sure if there is a tradition term for these. At the time of writing I found Some products simply called cable splitters or separators and Ritchey quick disconnectors


8

There is nothing special about Park Tool's side cutter pliers. I would guess that they re-brand reasonable quality generic ones rather than make their own. Any decent quality, sufficiently heavy duty ones will be fine. Cable cutters are handy to cleanly cut brake and gear shift cable, but not strictly necessary. Any cable stout cutter than has the same ...


8

Jagwire calls these "Hose Guide for Frame Loops". I've also found these under "Cable Guide" on Amazon.


7

You need a stepped shift ferrule. You have no reasonable options if you're using compressionless shift housing. On the left is a picture of a 5mm to 4mm one, which Jagwire is the main remaining producer of. On the right is the Shimano 4mm one, which in my experience is the commonly encountered one for 4mm housing. There are Campy ones too, but I think they ...


7

It looks like you have 4mm housing put into ferrules designed for 5mm housing. The black plastic ones should be the right ones.


7

You'll need longer cables in order to bridge the distance between where your original downtube shifters were and the stem (where the new shifters will be mounted). And you'll need to install a shifter cable housing going from your new cable stops (on the downtube where the original downtube shifters were located) to the new shifters on the stem. If you plan ...


7

I assume that you have a friction shifter? A friction shifter is one that does not click into an indexed position. You just adjust it until the derailleur is lined up where you want it. Assuming this is the case, the brake cable housing is what you should be using because it was the stuff that was around when those derailleurs were designed. The ...


7

It's about distance, not force. Coil housing is not at all impaired in its ability to transmit force once any distance between its coils has been taken up (so no to your second question.) On any rim brake that doesn't have egregious bends, the practical difference between compressionless and coil housing is marginal. It's a little stiffer and more responsive ...


7

5mm is the standard for bike parts made since I don't even know when, 1940s-ish. 6mm was an early MTB thing and is found on some 80s brake parts and frame housing stops. Don't worry about it unless you're working with a vintage mountain bike with overtly chunky housing and cables. 5.5mm is confusing the way a few manufacturers toss the number around. ...


7

It's happening because some area where the housing contacts a frame member or housing port is pulling on the housing when the suspension actuates, but not releasing it on the return. There is no singular trick to fix this. Assuming the housing setup is as-intended, it's a design problem. Here are some things you can try: Figure out where the catch is ...


6

Cable housing are supposed to be cut with a proper cable and housing cutter tool, such as the Park Tool Company CN-10. These tools have a shearing action and curved blades that help prevent the housing being crushed. Pliers have blades that meet rather than shearing past each other thus must crush the housing before they cut it. I'm pretty sure that any ...


6

I would suggest replacing the inner as well as all the outers. If the inner is frayed at all, you will not be able to rethread it. The benefits of a new cable are much better shifting, to the point cables are considered a consumable by many riders - just like tires and brake pads. Shifter cables are very generic and cheap - as low as $5 online for a set. ...


6

Short answer is no. In terms of normal bulk housing, it used to be that 5mm shift housings were more associated with mountain/utility and 4mm were more associated with road. Now 4mm has become more the norm for everything, although it's kind of a matter of perspective because there are a lot of bikes still running around with 5mm, and you can still buy 5mm. ...


6

You need a cable cutter. All of the companies that make tools for bikes make them. Here are a few options: http://www.parktool.com/product/professional-cable-and-housing-cutter-cn-10 http://pedros.com/products/tools/brakes-and-shifting/cable-cutter/ http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1030380_-1___400625 As some of the other answers/...


6

Its likely that your bad shifting is due to messed up cables or a misadjusted derailleur. You can either cut the cable crimp off at the end of the cable with a pair of pliers, or pull it off with a pair of pliers. As for replacing the cable housing, you can either get your bike shop to cut a piece of housing of the right length by taking your old housing ...


6

I just came across them at https://www.kineticbikebearings.com/kbb9038-slotted-cable-guide-pack-qty-20.html, called Slotted Cable Guides or slotted (wedge type) cable guide. The term slotted might help disambiguate from other search results.


6

The usual approach is to disconnect the lever nut, cut off the hose just below the factory barb, and then feed it through from the caliper end up to the lever. Then you turn the bars all the way and hold up the hose next to the lever and mark the spot you'll trim to for optimal length. Cut, slide on cover and nut, install new barb and olive, reconnect and ...


5

I can't confirm, but it's worth noting that if the reviewer was a do-it-yourselfer, then they might've been trying to cut it with a pair of regular wire cutters instead of a bicycle-appropriate pair of cable cutters. As long as your cable cutters are sharp, you should be able to snip it without excessive trouble.


5

I see you don't want to buy the proper tool - do consider that while some are silly expensive, there are also reasonably priced alternatives. Brands like Birzman and X-Tools are a third the cost of a Park or Pedro's tool. Another option is to use a rotary cutoff disk in a tool like a dremel, or even a full-sized cutoff wheel in a grinder. If you have one ...


5

Brake a shifter cable and housings are fairly standardized, so you don't need a special type. There is big difference between shifter and brake cables and housings. You absolutely must not use shifter cables/housings for brakes. Brake cables have different ends for road and mountain bikes, so you need to make sure you get road brake cables. Obviously you ...


5

It's a nice piece of history you have there. You will find that some of the newer generation Dura Ace final gear outer (the section closes to the derailleur) is sometimes supplied in this type, as is stuff right at the bottom of Shimano's range, IE Tourney. The main advantage is that it is very flexible which is needed for that final curve. The reason it ...


5

All mechanical disc brakes should have compressionless. The total pad travel distance is something like a fifth or a tenth of what it would be with a rim brake. Any length change of the housing is amplified in terms of waste lever travel by the same amount. Spyres and Spykes are good brakes, but using spiral housing on them can create problems that a caliper ...


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