22

Don't use cable stops. The biggest load those stops will ever see is when you grab your brakes hard for an emergency stop. So you're likely to find out that whatever you did to bond the stops to the frame wasn't strong enough or fatigue-resistant enough at the absolute worst possible time. And you'll never be able to know if your work is fatigue-resistant ...


19

This is one of those questions that can start arguments between bike mechanics--to cross or not to cross the derailer cables. Crossing appears to be becoming more common on new bikes, if the cables aren't internal, but it's also going to depend upon the bike. Smoother shifting is reported by some from crossed cables. I would talk to the mechanic at your LBS ...


17

Beside a professionally done welding, clamp-on cable stops should be a reasonably reliable solution.


15

Usually what you do is disconnect it at the lever, install the lever to the bar, and run the hose up from the caliper end. Because it's sealed on the other end, no more than a few drops of fluid will escape. Then once it's through you can size the hose by turning the bars as far as they go while holding the hose up to the lever and finding the length where ...


14

I'd go with full housing for both brake and gear cables and hold the cables on with cable clamps. There are many kinds of cable clamps to choose from. I prefer the type that have a screw clamp over the clip on type. The key will be finding clamps for your tubing diameter. If you need to have cable stops there are clamp on versions from a variety of vendors....


12

One difference that internal cables make is if you transport your bike by car or have to haul it around by hand. Because the cables are inside the frame, they are less likely to get pinched by the clamp on your car-mount (especially if you use a trunk mount that clamps the top-tube). This is also true for car/bus bike mounts that clamp the down tube. If you ...


10

Since you have a relatively "flat" spot there (at least flat in the longitudinal direction) you have two options: You can epoxy on a replacement boss I did this on a recent Al frame with the exact same problem. I bought a metal (steel) cable boss from the local bike builder and epoxied it myself. I used Loctite's Metal/Concrete epoxy since it's designed ...


10

I have seen this frequently and routed my cables this way. By routing the shifter cable from the right side of the handlebar around the stem to the cable boss on the left side of the frame (and visa versa) I create a more gentle bend in the in the cable housing. A gentler bend creates less internal friction on the cable. Another benefit is less stress on the ...


9

You don't need to put anything in there. If you're really concerned get teflon coated cables. Those kinds of braze on cable guides were "standard" issue on well made lugged steel bikes until the early 80's or so. ( Cheap bikes came with bolt on versions of the same guides. ) They worked just fine even with old style cables that were much rougher than ...


8

Not sure if there is a tradition term for these. At the time of writing I found Some products simply called cable splitters or separators and Ritchey quick disconnectors


7

You can run the cable outer housing exactly the same as the hydarulic hose. The main reason for using frame stops is to provide sections that don't suffer from compression of the outer housing under load. A full run of brake housing could compress and use some of the braking power. You could solve this by using compressionless brake housing, which has ...


7

A quick google research lead me to this article about comparisons of Campy and Shimano cables: Campy / Shimano Cable Comparison: Brake cable end fittings: Shimano "mushroom cap" diameter: 0.238"(6.05 mm) Shimano "shank" diameter: 0.140" (3.56 mm) Campy "mushroom cap" diameter: 0.214" (5.44 mm) Campy "shank"diameter: 0.138" (3.51 mm) ...


7

You don't have to buy Campy brand cables, but you do have to buy Campy-compatible cables, because they use a head that's a little bit smaller for both shift and brake cables. If you ignore this, it can seem like it's fine, but get stuck in your lever. The alternative in a pinch is taking a little off with a grinder or file. Most shops will have individual ...


7

Internal cable routing is not a requirement, as long as you have functional cable stops on your the frame, you should be able to cable up a newer cable group set without issue. In fact it should be easier than internal able routing, which can be quite fiddly to get the cabling to pass through restrictions. The primary advantage of internal routing is ...


7

You'll need longer cables in order to bridge the distance between where your original downtube shifters were and the stem (where the new shifters will be mounted). And you'll need to install a shifter cable housing going from your new cable stops (on the downtube where the original downtube shifters were located) to the new shifters on the stem. If you plan ...


6

Good epoxy is known to bond metals, especially aluminum very well. Make sure the surfaces are clean and slightly rough for a better bond. I use the same two part epoxy hobbyist aircraft builders use for fixing pretty much anything, including broken ceramic mugs, small broken metal things and even as an insulator on the bottom of PCBs to prevent any shorts. ...


6

In Shimano-ese, it is part of the "Outer Receiving Unit." You can pull up the exploded view diagram for you specific hub model on techdocs.shimano.com to corroborate what you need. Then you can google around for "shimano outer receiving unit" and get the right part number for your hub on the off chance that it's different for the different Shimano internal ...


6

The usual approach is to disconnect the lever nut, cut off the hose just below the factory barb, and then feed it through from the caliper end up to the lever. Then you turn the bars all the way and hold up the hose next to the lever and mark the spot you'll trim to for optimal length. Cut, slide on cover and nut, install new barb and olive, reconnect and ...


5

You need top tube cable clamp probably 3 of them, maybe 4. Two will be insufficient. Do measure your top tube first - Top tube could be 25.4mm (1 inch) or 26mm, and you want it right diameter. This shows how the clamps are installed along the top tube to retain the rear brake cable housing, which is one single long piece of outer.


5

Its definitely a stop for the outer cable, allowing the inner cable to proceed. On a shimano Alfine or Nexus IGH it is on the end of the Cassette Joint, part "CJ-S7000-8" which is part of the "Alfine Small Parts Set" part nmber "SM-7000-8" This kit is surprisingly not-too-expensive, considering the green/blue anti-rotation washers cost 1/4 of the whole ...


5

I looked at some pictures of the bike. The thing that fits most of your symptoms is that when the FD cable is under tension, it does something to the alignment of the guide plate that the cables are wrapping around, pulling it closer in against the frame such that the RD cable suddenly has tension relieved from it and therefore can't make it up to the big ...


5

There's not a reasonable way of doing it unless you're content with having it look really funny. The closest it comes is on some internally routed bars, the run of housing between the lever and the entry point is fairly short. One can imagine contriving a way of doing this with one of those bars, like run just that little bit of housing above the tape, or ...


4

This setup is used less for reduced friction (although many make this argument) and more to keep the cable housing off the head tube so that you don't damage the paint. For example, running the right shifter cable to the right down tube cable stop, this forces the cable housing to make a sharper bend forcing the cable housing to rub the head tube. If we ...


4

If you have a 3D printer, you can design cable stops that fit your frame and print them. This is one I made: I have been using this version for a few weeks now and it also feels super strong on the frame. Even with some amount of force it can't be moved or turned by hand. It is printed with PLA. For the 3D modeling I used TINKERCAD. I just made an improved ...


4

I'm sad to say that I solved my issue by adding a clamp-on cable stop much like this one: . If going down this route an optional extra is to poke the blockage with such force and frustration that your poking stick (coat hanger) breaks off and is stuck forever inside the chainstay. I elected to go down this route, but my understanding is that it's not ...


4

The thinking with them is to protect the contact point from contamination and provide a slick surface, reducing friction. They do achieve that to an extent, especially early in their life. The problem is when the liner itself starts junking up with grime that can't be easily removed, it will then cause friction problems itself. For this reason, I think ...


4

Cable Splitter is the name you're looking for. Another brand name is "Easy Split" but that's essentially the same thing. JTek has some that look like this: The end on the right hand side is clamped down with one or two tiny grub screws, which feels like a weak point. Plus they look to scratch up the frame's paint at that point, and make a tap-tap noise ...


4

Either Adam's suggestion or this: If you're going with a very recent FD, like all the Shimano toggle ones and many mountain FDs in general, a lot of them have integrated stops also, so you could do the same sort of routing. Some not super recent mountain FDs have stops for full housing too. If it would play nice with whatever you're building the bike back ...


4

Bit of a frame challenge, but there are a few other options: Use cable housing with replaceable liner, so you don’t have to touch the housing under the tape. Don’t replace the housing under the bar tape. Insert a barrel adjuster where the housing comes out from under the bar tape so you can replace the rest of it. There are some recent, proprietary road ...


3

For the most part you can just disconnect the lever end, taking off the olive but leaving the barb, shake off any loose drops and pull it through. The system is closed on the other end so it won't come spilling out. Two other ways if you want or need to do something unusual: disconnect the hose from the lever, attach a bottle to the hose to connect the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible