Hot answers tagged

75

Cables: The main difference that I am aware of is the diameter of the cable. Most brake cables are 1.5 or 1.6mm in diameter. Most shift cables are 1.1 or 1.2mm, galvanized shifter cables are 1.3mm. I'm sure that there is a lot of science behind the difference but I'll leave that to someone else. One major difference in MTB vs road BRAKE cable is the ...


37

As many cable manufacturers recommend, modern cables+housings are designed to not be lubricated. So, if you have modern cables, I'd probably avoid lubricating the cables period.


22

Don't use cable stops. The biggest load those stops will ever see is when you grab your brakes hard for an emergency stop. So you're likely to find out that whatever you did to bond the stops to the frame wasn't strong enough or fatigue-resistant enough at the absolute worst possible time. And you'll never be able to know if your work is fatigue-resistant ...


21

Such rubber rings are supposed to keep gear and brake cables from rubbing against frame tubes. That is, when the cables are mounted openly outside the frame.


19

This is one of those questions that can start arguments between bike mechanics--to cross or not to cross the derailer cables. Crossing appears to be becoming more common on new bikes, if the cables aren't internal, but it's also going to depend upon the bike. Smoother shifting is reported by some from crossed cables. I would talk to the mechanic at your LBS ...


17

As stated, modern teflon line outer cables do not require lubrication. These cables are often designated as being 2P-class cables. 1P cables lack the liner. Not all cables carry such an indication, visual inspection will quickly show if a liner is present. A teflon liner is a thin, plastic layer inside the outer cable, often white or light blue. If you have ...


17

Beside a professionally done welding, clamp-on cable stops should be a reasonably reliable solution.


13

For better or for worse, Shimano has been pushing coated cables as the default option for their road groups for a while now. There are two 10-speed Tiagras; 4600 came with normal uncoated stainless cables and the more current 4700 comes with Optislick cables, their more basic coated option. All the 11-speed groups come with some type of coated cable. Coated ...


13

This is a slightly fringe topic that will draw some blank stares at many cable-selling establishments. Common shift cables come in 1.2mm and 1.1mm thicknesses for the cable part. SRAM (and I believe Sachs before them) specs 1.1mm for all Gripshift models. Shimano and most other companies use 1.2mm. The difference of course is tiny. It's negligible in most ...


13

The most likely causes are cable friction and derailleur hanger misalignment. Indexing adjustment has gotten more sensitive to both as the speed count has increased. Derailleur hanger misalignment will tend to reduce the margin for error in the adjustment, and make it hard to avoid certain gears where there's some jumping or noise. When it's aligned, the ...


12

I would suggest leaving new cable housings as they are. From my experience with riding MTB bikes in different conditions, lubing them only attracts more dust. I suggest regular cleaning and using oil only for short term reviving. These cables need to be replaced once in a while anyway.


12

I use chain lube since I also prefer the solvent+grease wet chain lubes. That's exactly what you want inside cable housings. Popping the quick releases on brakes or frame attachments on gear cables, then dribbling chain lube along the inner so it runs down into the outer works well on cables that are already installed and doesn't require re-adjusting ...


12

One difference that internal cables make is if you transport your bike by car or have to haul it around by hand. Because the cables are inside the frame, they are less likely to get pinched by the clamp on your car-mount (especially if you use a trunk mount that clamps the top-tube). This is also true for car/bus bike mounts that clamp the down tube. If you ...


12

There are three rubber rings, also known as "cable donuts" in your picture. With a little effort you can separate them and space them out along the cable. As gschenk says, they are supposed to prevent rubbing or slapping damage to paint or decals and prevent cable slapping noise. They get mixed reviews.


11

I recently upgraded my brake cables with some Jagwire of the compressionless variety. jm2 is correct in saying the steel housing is reinforced with kevlar to prevent the longitudinal wires from buckling. The performance is very good and my brakes are far more responsive than with the old, traditional spiral-wound housing that was there before. That said, ...


11

The cable turns a double right angle in quite a small space. It's a very common failure on all the 11speed shifters from 9000/6800 onwards. The "solution" is to change the right hand cable at a regular service interval, perhaps 2/3rds of the mileage you did with the current cable. One benefit of the new design is that it is considerably quicker and ...


10

I believe Sheldon wrote this before there was brake specific compressionless housing available on the market. My understanding is that brake specific compressionless housing is reinforced with Kevlar, not plastic, and it has certainly been rigorously tested to work as expected. The folks I know that run compressionless housing on their mechanical disc brake ...


10

I have seen this frequently and routed my cables this way. By routing the shifter cable from the right side of the handlebar around the stem to the cable boss on the left side of the frame (and visa versa) I create a more gentle bend in the in the cable housing. A gentler bend creates less internal friction on the cable. Another benefit is less stress on the ...


10

Cable stretch is mostly just things settling into place (ferrules into housing, housing into frame stops, housing compressing) rather than physical stretching of the cables, and after a week or so of installing new cables, you simply adjust them to the right tension. This is normal, as is periodic adjustments of cable tensions involved on your bicycle. ...


10

I've had my fair share of hydraulic brake woes this year so I'll list the things I'd check - I am aware that you've done some already. Firstly some questions though: Are these brakes using mineral oil or dot fluid? If it's dot fluid, when attempting to bleed the system you may want to take extra care and de-gas the liquid like with Avid brakes. The comments ...


10

The brake outer cable and ferrule most probably popped out of the barrel adjuster on the brake lever. This can happen when you panic brake if your brakes were a little out of adjustment -- basically you pulled in a ton of inner cable while you were saying "ohhhh mmmyyyyyyy" and then when you let go of your death grip, the inner cable went back out and as ...


10

The difference is the lump on the end that engages with the brake lever. (right) A flat bar lever generally looks like a small cylinder or barrel, with the wire coming out the side. (left) A drop bar lever is more of a "droplet" shape with the wire coming out the axis. Campagnolo ones are different again. This wire comes with one on each end, and ...


9

It's not a given that the full-length housing is lower friction. I suspect that a well-done exposed cable scheme is lower friction than a full housing. Especially for indexed shifters, the cable housing changes effective length with tension and temperature changes. The exposed cable scheme has much less flex and hence more precision shifting. The full-...


9

Congratulations on your new steed, and great work putting it together! Looks like a nice ride. Long post follows, but I've tried to edit it into something a bit more manageable. Here goes... Before you start You mentioned you were able to set everything up but the brakes. Forgive my impertinence, but before you go further, can I just check that you greased ...


9

You don't need to put anything in there. If you're really concerned get teflon coated cables. Those kinds of braze on cable guides were "standard" issue on well made lugged steel bikes until the early 80's or so. ( Cheap bikes came with bolt on versions of the same guides. ) They worked just fine even with old style cables that were much rougher than ...


9

Fourth hand cable stretcher - I think this is one tool I'll need to get, or something similar. I see Pedro's makes a version of it, I'm not sure if it's made as solidly or not. What should I look for when buying one of these? Never found I needed one, typically I pull the inner brake cable as far as possible then close the brake calipers all the way (i.e., ...


9

You do not really need the housing functionally, the bowden runs straight between two fixed points. There is nothing that could compress or deform. It just works well as is. You only could add it as a mechanical protection but it is not customary and could add some additional unnecessary friction.


9

Racier bikes do it above all because it's weight that can be taken away. That may sound trifling, but you get to a light bike by marginal gains in lots of little places. On other bikes it's about the compromise between squish and contaminant ingress. Interrupted housing gives more entry points to water and dirt. So it needs to be replaced more and can be ...


9

Your shift cables need to be replaced, like NOW. This is a very possible symptom of deteriorating cables (as in, starting to fray and eventually snap), which makes sense considering 10 and 11s brifters have a reputation for eating shift cables. Juhist has a good answer explaining the mechanism and reasoning. 30Mm is a lot of riding and the cables are well ...


8

I believe one reason is more "stiffness" in the cable. Cable housing typically contracts when the cable is contracted. That's why Nokon also builds bicycle cable housing now. With The frame attachments, you get almost half a meter less housing that may contract. This could lead to crisper shift and brake feel.


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