Hot answers tagged

62

Cables: The main difference that I am aware of is the diameter of the cable. Most brake cables are 1.5 or 1.6mm in diameter. Most shift cables are 1.1 or 1.2mm, galvanized shifter cables are 1.3mm. I'm sure that there is a lot of science behind the difference but I'll leave that to someone else. One major difference in MTB vs road BRAKE cable is the ...


37

As many cable manufacturers recommend, modern cables+housings are designed to not be lubricated. So, if you have modern cables, I'd probably avoid lubricating the cables period.


21

Such rubber rings are supposed to keep gear and brake cables from rubbing against frame tubes. That is, when the cables are mounted openly outside the frame.


18

This is one of those questions that can start arguments between bike mechanics--to cross or not to cross the derailer cables. Crossing appears to be becoming more common on new bikes, if the cables aren't internal, but it's also going to depend upon the bike. Smoother shifting is reported by some from crossed cables. I would talk to the mechanic at your LBS ...


17

As stated, modern teflon line outer cables do not require lubrication. These cables are often designated as being 2P-class cables. 1P cables lack the liner. Not all cables carry such an indication, visual inspection will quickly show if a liner is present. A teflon liner is a thin, plastic layer inside the outer cable, often white or light blue. If you have ...


13

For better or for worse, Shimano has been pushing coated cables as the default option for their road groups for a while now. There are two 10-speed Tiagras; 4600 came with normal uncoated stainless cables and the more current 4700 comes with Optislick cables, their more basic coated option. All the 11-speed groups come with some type of coated cable. Coated ...


12

I would suggest leaving new cable housings as they are. From my experience with riding MTB bikes in different conditions, lubing them only attracts more dust. I suggest regular cleaning and using oil only for short term reviving. These cables need to be replaced once in a while anyway.


12

I use chain lube since I also prefer the solvent+grease wet chain lubes. That's exactly what you want inside cable housings. Popping the quick releases on brakes or frame attachments on gear cables, then dribbling chain lube along the inner so it runs down into the outer works well on cables that are already installed and doesn't require re-adjusting ...


12

There are three rubber rings, also known as "cable donuts" in your picture. With a little effort you can separate them and space them out along the cable. As gschenk says, they are supposed to prevent rubbing or slapping damage to paint or decals and prevent cable slapping noise. They get mixed reviews.


12

This is a slightly fringe topic that will draw some blank stares at many cable-selling establishments. Common shift cables come in 1.2mm and 1.1mm thicknesses for the cable part. SRAM (and I believe Sachs before them) specs 1.1mm for all Gripshift models. Shimano and most other companies use 1.2mm. The difference of course is tiny. It's negligible in most ...


11

One difference that internal cables make is if you transport your bike by car or have to haul it around by hand. Because the cables are inside the frame, they are less likely to get pinched by the clamp on your car-mount (especially if you use a trunk mount that clamps the top-tube). This is also true for car/bus bike mounts that clamp the down tube. If you ...


10

I recently upgraded my brake cables with some Jagwire of the compressionless variety. jm2 is correct in saying the steel housing is reinforced with kevlar to prevent the longitudinal wires from buckling. The performance is very good and my brakes are far more responsive than with the old, traditional spiral-wound housing that was there before. That said, ...


10

I have seen this frequently and routed my cables this way. By routing the shifter cable from the right side of the handlebar around the stem to the cable boss on the left side of the frame (and visa versa) I create a more gentle bend in the in the cable housing. A gentler bend creates less internal friction on the cable. Another benefit is less stress on the ...


10

Cable stretch is mostly just things settling into place (ferrules into housing, housing into frame stops, housing compressing) rather than physical stretching of the cables, and after a week or so of installing new cables, you simply adjust them to the right tension. This is normal, as is periodic adjustments of cable tensions involved on your bicycle. ...


10

I've had my fair share of hydraulic brake woes this year so I'll list the things I'd check - I am aware that you've done some already. Firstly some questions though: Are these brakes using mineral oil or dot fluid? If it's dot fluid, when attempting to bleed the system you may want to take extra care and de-gas the liquid like with Avid brakes. The comments ...


10

The brake outer cable and ferrule most probably popped out of the barrel adjuster on the brake lever. This can happen when you panic brake if your brakes were a little out of adjustment -- basically you pulled in a ton of inner cable while you were saying "ohhhh mmmyyyyyyy" and then when you let go of your death grip, the inner cable went back out and as ...


9

I wouldn't say that a single broken strand on a new brake cable would render the bike "totally unsafe to ride," but if it is an option you should bring it back to the shop and have them replace it. This might be a sign that whoever put this bike together or inspected it for sale doesn't have a very thorough shop ethic. If they were careless enough to install ...


9

I believe Sheldon wrote this before there was brake specific compressionless housing available on the market. My understanding is that brake specific compressionless housing is reinforced with Kevlar, not plastic, and it has certainly been rigorously tested to work as expected. The folks I know that run compressionless housing on their mechanical disc brake ...


9

It's not a given that the full-length housing is lower friction. I suspect that a well-done exposed cable scheme is lower friction than a full housing. Especially for indexed shifters, the cable housing changes effective length with tension and temperature changes. The exposed cable scheme has much less flex and hence more precision shifting. The full-...


8

The problem that you'll likely run into is the stop in the lever/shifter ends. I'm not aware of any systems that will accept bare cable at this end: Cable Ends http://c771741.r41.cf2.rackcdn.com/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/b/b/bbb-bcb-20-brakewire-bicycle-cable.jpg If you wanted to pair your spool of wire with some sort ...


8

You are correct. This is different than "regular" cables. On regular cables you pick the end you want and cut off the other. Thats because the connection on the cut-off end is usually a clamp. You run the cable under a screw/nut and tighten it down. Then you just put a cable crimp on the end to protect the cut cable However, your internal hub cable is ...


8

I believe one reason is more "stiffness" in the cable. Cable housing typically contracts when the cable is contracted. That's why Nokon also builds bicycle cable housing now. With The frame attachments, you get almost half a meter less housing that may contract. This could lead to crisper shift and brake feel.


8

Congratulations on your new steed, and great work putting it together! Looks like a nice ride. Long post follows, but I've tried to edit it into something a bit more manageable. Here goes... Before you start You mentioned you were able to set everything up but the brakes. Forgive my impertinence, but before you go further, can I just check that you greased ...


8

You don't need to put anything in there. If you're really concerned get teflon coated cables. Those kinds of braze on cable guides were "standard" issue on well made lugged steel bikes until the early 80's or so. ( Cheap bikes came with bolt on versions of the same guides. ) They worked just fine even with old style cables that were much rougher than ...


8

Not entirely surprised you have problems refer here... According to this link, Cable Pull for a Campy 10 shifter is 2.8mm, dérailleur ratio for a Campy is 1.5 (or 1.4 for old) Cassette sprocket pitch for SRam 9 is 4.35. So a single shift on the the 10speed is 2.8*1.5 = 4.2mm (ideal is 4.35). Over a 9 speeds that an error of 1.35mm, so when tuning, you ...


8

There is nothing special about Park Tool's side cutter pliers. I would guess that they re-brand reasonable quality generic ones rather than make their own. Any decent quality, sufficiently heavy duty ones will be fine. Cable cutters are handy to cleanly cut brake and gear shift cable, but not strictly necessary. Any cable stout cutter than has the same ...


8

Not sure if there is a tradition term for these. At the time of writing I found Some products simply called cable splitters or separators and Ritchey quick disconnectors


8

Here's an annotated rotated version of your photo: To get the wheel in: Pull the RUBBER BOOT to the right, slide it along the INNER CABLE toward the PINCH BOLT Squeeze the BRAKE ARMS together at the top. This allows the NOODLE to move to the left, permitting the YOKE to swing away from the NOODLE. When the bike is upside down like yours, it may need a ...


7

What are the reasons of the other cabling schemes? Most Cyclocross bikes will route all the rear cables along the top of the top tube. In a cyclocross race, you will get off and shoulder your bike, the cables would get in the way on the underside of the top tube. Many CX bikes have a flat bottom top tube as well for easier shouldering. Routing the cables ...


7

Bike parts.com lists them as Sram rotating dual line hooks # BPC 147851.


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