22

The "asymmetric wheel" terminology is a little misleading. This particular wheel has an asymmetric rim. Any bike with a rear derailer setup will have an asymmetric rear wheel, because the gears take up space. The usual way to handle this is that the spokes on the gear side have less of an angle (closer to vertical) than on the non-gear side. (That is, they ...


9

Beyond the question of finickiness of actually using the system with higher cog counts, it's a matter of whether there's enough total cable pull from the shifter in friction mode to cover the range of movement needed given the cassette used and the actuation ratio of the derailer. Here's an excellent article with the basic data you need to figure it out, ...


8

Not entirely surprised you have problems refer here... According to this link, Cable Pull for a Campy 10 shifter is 2.8mm, dérailleur ratio for a Campy is 1.5 (or 1.4 for old) Cassette sprocket pitch for SRam 9 is 4.35. So a single shift on the the 10speed is 2.8*1.5 = 4.2mm (ideal is 4.35). Over a 9 speeds that an error of 1.35mm, so when tuning, you ...


8

I'll declare an interest in that my company is the senior (Main) Technical, Service and Warranty Centre for Campagnolo in the UK - but having said that. the Service Centre work that we do for Campagnolo is not all of what we do - we supply general technical training to the industry across the board and I am also part owner and Technical Director of a ...


8

The wheel itself is not asymmetric, but the rim is. The reason for this is that the cassette hub itself is asymmetric, and shifting the spoke attachment at rim allows more even spoke tension. The clear benefit of even tension is durability. On one hand, peak tension and associated stresses are reduced, on the other hand loose spokes cause problems and ...


7

With respect to @fandango68, there are a number of misstatements. This part appears correct: Type 20 - Shamal Ultra, Eurus, Zonda and Neutron Ultra Wheels Type 40 - Vento, Khamsin and Khamsin CX Wheels Generic - everything else I added links to stores that sell the first two types of skewers. I can't find a generic level of Campy skewer. Also,...


7

You don't have to buy Campy brand cables, but you do have to buy Campy-compatible cables, because they use a head that's a little bit smaller for both shift and brake cables. If you ignore this, it can seem like it's fine, but get stuck in your lever. The alternative in a pinch is taking a little off with a grinder or file. Most shops will have individual ...


7

A quick google research lead me to this article about comparisons of Campy and Shimano cables: Campy / Shimano Cable Comparison: Brake cable end fittings: Shimano "mushroom cap" diameter: 0.238"(6.05 mm) Shimano "shank" diameter: 0.140" (3.56 mm) Campy "mushroom cap" diameter: 0.214" (5.44 mm) Campy "shank"diameter: 0.138" (3.51 mm) ...


7

Campagnolo's system is to provide a tag,Certilogo, with new wheels which people can scan to confirm it is indeed authentic. However, with a used wheel, there is no such tag. With carbon fiber, its incredibly easy for people to make very good counterfeits, so as Campagnolo says, if the wheel doesn't come with the tag, you should consider it being from ...


7

No. The Veloce crankset (assuming it's a 2011+ version) uses Campy's Power Torque system to attach the left crank arm. The Centaur crankarm offered by Stages uses Campy's Ultra Torque design, as do all of the Campy crankarms Stages offers. They are completely different.


6

Drilling a crank that old is not a great idea. They weren't that strong to begin with and 40+ years of use hasn't made then any stronger. I would not do anything to further weaken them. To be honest, if the pedals are frozen I'd think twice about using that crank. Aluminum corrosion expands and can create stress that crack the material ( similar to the way ...


6

Both answers are correct but I want to add a bit more. The asymmetric in the title also refers to the spoke lacing of the wheel. If you look at the photo, you'll notice that it is cross-spoked on the drive side but radially spoked on the non-drive side. This feature can also be seen below in combination with asymmetric spoke construction. Both the lacing ...


6

Closest thing out there is the Shimano SM-CB90 in-line brake QR, which exists to be paired with direct mount road calipers but would solve this problem too.


5

No. There are no frame changes required. The only time I could imagine this would be required is if you are looking at the electronic groupos, and frames that have specific battery mounts for one particular groupo. However, even then I'm sure there'd be a workaround.


5

I don't think you will need to change the frame, I looked at one of the bianchi series a while back and I saw the same frame (the Oltre - I can but dream) offered at different prices depending on the groupset. But the groupsets available were from both shimano and campag. There's variations with Dura Ace, Ultegra, Athena, Super Record etc. I can't imagine ...


4

In general, no. Campy, Shimano, and Suntour (and other) friction shift systems are compatible because where the chain lands is up to you. There are some caveats that you'll have to resolve with trial and error. In particular some rear derailleurs have "longer reach" than others. You may not be able to shift to the largest cog on some freewheels if the ...


4

Getting a 7-speed (or indeed any) Campy cassette wouldn't do you much good anyway since the rest of your drivetrain will be Shimano. As you've discovered the two don't mix. (Or rather, they are not supposed to mix and you can expect problems if you do try to mix them. Never say never, I guess!) I reckon your cheapest option could be to visit your LBS and to ...


4

You'd have to change the rear wheel or have it rebuilt on a campy hub (the shimano hub is not compatible with campy cogs), and of course all the components. That said, nothing should need to be changed on the frame itself.


4

I haven't found any campy replacement freehub for a deore... esp since shimano uses different incompatible freehub bodies for its different hubs, and Deore being a mountain group, campy being mostly road, I don't see there being any market for such a conversion. That being said, if you find a replacement campy rear hub with a similar flange size, you could ...


4

This is a big question. Clicks and creaks can be related to a good many things, sometimes the crankset and / or the BB, sometimes not. Do the simple stuff first. Check: The cassette lockring is properly tight - it does need to be at the correct torque, usually marked on the lockring iteself, typically 40 nm. If it's a Campag wheel, that the end pieces ...


4

Your problem is worn out (or broken) index springs aka G-springs. These are part of the shifter mechanism. Worn out G-springs will enable rear derailleur spring to pull the cable over the indexes. One way to test is putting the rear derailleur on bigger sprocket and pull the cable. If it drops indexes (goes to smaller sprocket) then the problem is caused ...


4

Campagnolo wheels are available with both Shimano/SRAM and Campagnolo cassette compatible freewheel bodies. Ask which cassette your friend has and if they have Campagnolo, you can get the correct freehub body as a spare part. SRAM/Shimano and Campagnolo cassettes have slightly different cog spacing. You can mix them, but the derailleur adjustment will be ...


4

Daytona and Chorus use different cage fixings, so swapping a Daytona cage in in place of a Chorus 10s one is not possible. Daytona used a circlip, Chorus uses a tubular bolt to secure the cage to the lower pivot assembly of the rear derailleur (RD). Unless the RD has been crashed, or the cage has been "snagged" by the spokes of the rear wheel, it's ...


4

In the very last image of the video there appears to be a small screw hole in the caliper. Looking from the right side of the bike it is behind the exposed cable, between the adjuster and the cable clamp. That screw will adjust the spring tension. Turning the screw "in" will increase the tension on the spring. The increased tension will delay the brake ...


4

The wheel in question uses sealed bearings. They are generally not serviceable. Service consists of replacement. You mentioned they appear to have plenty of grease on them. With a good bearing there should be grease in them and sealed in place by the seal. The only time grease will be visible is if the seal has failed. The seal usually fails because of ...


4

I have managed to overhaul early 2000s Veloce and Mirage, which have the exact same mechanism down to spare part codes, using only the exploded view from the spare parts catalog. The exploded view looks like an explosion of small parts, but in reality the parts can all be removed and added one at a time, like in the UltraShift video. The mechanisms work on ...


4

I have the same model front derailleur and have experienced the same issue. It is unlikely that the bike is bending enough under pedalling force to cause this (unless the frame is broken or cracked). More likely it is a problem with the front derailleur, and the extra chain tension from pedalling hard exacerbates it. Now, obviously if there is damage such ...


4

If compatibility is what you're after, you should know that it's not always necessary to use the same group. Many times, you can mix and match different groups, even different manufacturers. As far as I know, all 10-speed Campy geartrain components should be compatible with each other. You have to consider the capacity of both derailleurs relative to your ...


3

In almost all cases when servicing a hub the bearing DO need to be replaced. You may not be able to see it without the aid of a microscope, but the bearings will be slightly pitted after any appreciable period of use. As one user points out, high grade ballbearings in case hardened steel, even grade 25s are very cheap - why cut the corner? Case hardened ...


3

Not brifters, but you can take your downtube shifters and use retroshift levers to get combined brake and and shifting. Essentially, they bolt a downtube shifter onto the hoods. Pretty cheap and reviews are generally positive. As for fitting more gears, you may be able to get a 7 speed freewheel, but you may better off taking your 6 speed freewheel to the ...


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