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31

I also live in Ottawa so I can provide some pertinent viewpoints. Yes, you should report it, and yes, it will probably be an exercise in frustration. Don't expect the police to do anything about it. However, you should report it anyway, it might end up in a database somewhere and give them another data point about why it's important to build more cycle ...


10

As one comment has indicated, you may need to evaluate if cold this extreme is even safe to ride in. If you determine that is is, there are several issues you'll need to address. There are a lot of questions here about winter cycling. I went through question with the winter tag. Here are some of the ones applicable to your situation: Breathing may be a ...


4

The law says Q3: Can I modify my e-bike so it can go faster than 32 km/h? No. Modifying your e-bike to increase its speed beyond 32 km/h will no longer qualify it as an e-bike. Which means that it's no longer a bicycle, it is a moped, scooter, or motorbike. Note that the bike can go faster, you just can't have a motor that operates while the bike is ...


3

I think your question is "can I go as fast as the speed limit of the road if I'm not using the electric motor?" The answer, in Ontario (thank you Google) appears to be yes. The "Ministry of Transportation" of Ontario has a page on electric bikes as well as a FAQ, both of which say that the bike can't exceed 32km/h. No modifications to ...


3

Biking-oriented gear is generally unsuitable for very cold temperatures — though things have gotten better in recent years, it seems lots of 'winter' biking gear is oriented towards 50 °F California winters. I'd look at ski gear and Army surplus extreme cold gear. Civia (of Minneapolis, Winnipeg's balmy southern neighbor) has an all-weather clothing guide, ...


3

I suggest getting neoprene covers for shoes and/or neoprene socks, which keep your feet warm even if they get wet from melting snow/slush from the road. If you ride clipless, make sure to get some insulation between the bolts for the pads and your feet. My SPD shoes have a metal plate on the inside that gets quite cold while riding. I had Pearl Izumi ...


3

You can't. The other answers focus exclusively on the cold. I have very little experience of being in temperatures below about -10°C so I can't comment on that. However, you also say that there are gale-force winds. That means sustained winds of 40+mph (65+km/h). It is simply not safe to cycle in that level of wind. Any time that hits you as a cross-...


2

In order to protect your hands and feet, I recommend some sort of active heating. If my hands are clumsy from a lack of circulation, or if my foot gets frost bites, the other issues discussed are of secondary concern to me. Basically, there are three types: heating pads that generate heat from oxidation of a metal-coal powder heating pads that generate ...


2

Yes, report it. Then if at some later point (heaven forbid) he decides to hit you, or tries to scare you again and misjudges things and hits you, the police will have a prior report establishing a pattern of behavior.


1

BC Canada https://engineering.ok.ubc.ca/__shared/assets/Bike_Sense-Nov0552189.pdf says After dark, all cyclists are required by law to have a front white headlight visible for a minimum of 150 metres, a rear red light which should be visible for a minimum of 100 metres, and a rear red reflector visible for 100 metres when directly illuminated by ...


1

There's an app called Wiki camps which is great for finding campgrounds and works offline. For free places to camp Community fields can be good. I met a couple guys yesterday who said they have had good luck with firestations, they've not been told no yet when they ask. There’s also a free camping website which is geared towards RV parking but does have ...


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