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24

For the ultimate in pizza carrying, you want a pneumatic air suspension, pendulum-based anti-sway bar equipped carrier. This are/were used by ramen delivery bicylists in Japan, although they are getting rarer (people don't order delivery ramen noodles like they used to) and mostly on motorcycles now: With one of these babies, your pizza (or ramen) will not ...


21

The advantages of seat mounted racks are that they don’t require rear dropout rack lugs; some of the seat mount racks have quick release levers so you can easily take them off (while racing or transporting the bike, etc), and are many times the only option for a rear suspension bike. The disadvantages of seat mount racks are numerous: max luggage weight ...


20

I normally just bungee cord in pizzas to my rear rack and go slowly over bumps and don't corner aggressively. Works fine for one pie. You could attach some plywood or something to the rack to provide a platform if you want it. For multiple pies though (delivery), I think a motorcycle-style carrier may be a good idea (for one, you'll want a heat retaining ...


20

I avoid backpacks where possible 1) Sweat - I get damp enough wearing just a cycling top. Putting anything else on top makes it much worse. 2) Crashing - Occasionally I have carried a toolbox in a tramping pack. One of the worries is "what happens if I end up rolling on this?" 3) Visibility - can be off-set with reflective tape or an overbag/wrapper/...


12

I think you would be much better off converting an old kids trailer. They can be found pretty cheap on Craigslist.


12

Weight on the bike is easier to manage than weight on your body. The bike will handle a bit differently, but you'll quickly get used to it. If all you use the bike for is commuting, you should get the rack. Like you, I commute with a backpack, but I wouldn't consider a rack because I also regularly use my bike for recreational purposes.


11

I'm answering my own question because I took a combination of the steps above, plus some other steps. I took steps to make getting it back in event of theft more likely: registered the bike with the Chicago police: https://portal.chicagopolice.org/portal/page/portal/ClearPath/Online%20Services/Bike%20Registration I plan to register it with https://www....


10

I've ridden many sportives at this distance in the UK and here is my experience. Food/Drink Looking at the route map there are 3 food stops and 11 water stops so you don't need to carry loads with you. I'd say a 750ml bottle will do. If you find you drink a lot on your training rides then take a second bottle. Food will be available at the stops but you ...


9

If you want to have a real cargo bike, e.g. an "inverse Bullit-style" the challenge will be structural integrity of your frame: you can't easily cut the 2nd diamond of your frame without risking to break the frame. However, I don't see a problem with removing your back saddle, cutting/removing the back cranks and building a sturdy plywood/mdf cargo hold ...


7

That particular bike looks like it has mounting points for a rear rack, which is the primary issue. In general, what you are looking for are the bolt holes or "braze-ons" usually just a few inches below where the seat stays connect to the seat tube, as well as ones above the rear axle on the dropout. If your bike doesn't have them, there are ways to mount a ...


7

I attached a waterproof spruce square (42x43 cm²) permanently with 8 cable zips to my luggage carrier. Corners rounded, holes for bungee cords drilled, bungee cords with cable zips permanently attached on the front sied (so they are not stolen). This is dirt cheap, a great help in everyday transport of any goods and lasts for over one year now. (...


7

Weight on your body takes additional energy to carry, but it's also easier to move dynamically (it moves with your body and doesn't change the feel of the bike). I have always used and preferred backpacks for commuting. In addition to being more dynamic, it's easier to deal with once you get to your destination. You simply get off your bike and walk away. ...


7

RoboKaren's answer is great on the pros and cons, so I'll restrict myself to explicitly answering ... why would someone get the seatpost-mounted rack over the frame-mounted rack? Really, the only reason is that your bike won't support a frame-mounted rack: for example because it has rear suspension. In engineering terms, a frame-mounted rack supports ...


7

A subset of panniers that are designed for shopping bags are often called "grocery panniers," the distinguishing features being an open top and dimensions similar to the base of a paper grocery bag (not that you can get those very much anymore). They are typically easily removable (just hooks), and in my experience do not bounce around alot, as was ...


6

The 6 year old is capable of pedaling, and would likely enjoying so. We have had success combining a single kid seat (the Yepp Maxi) with a Burley Piccolo on the back of a Yuba Mundo. This required some a bit of custom welding for Piccolo attachment, but it has been well worth it. This configuration gets used quite a lot by my wife and two kids. Here's what ...


6

I'm Dutch, thus when I went to high school I had to commute for about 20 km/1 hour for a single trip. Since it was high school and some days I really had a large and heavy pack. Carrying it alone in the halls of school was heavy, let alone biking with it. Most of us used a specific brand (Kipling) bag, and we mounted the bag on our bicycle with a support ...


6

The traditional solution on bicycles is metal wire basket. Metal is tougher than plastic and mesh instead of sheet metal makes it lightweight enough. If you need something waterproof, put your things in waterproof bag or get a more expensive bike-specific rack box.


6

A big reason to use panniers around town is that it keeps you from getting a sweaty back on a commute. If you're dashing around a city all day couriering you'll get sweaty with our without a backpack, and you're not smartly dressed to start with. But loading and unloading a rack takes time, and the whole point of bike couriers is to be quick. A few seconds ...


5

I used to strap mine to the bike frame, but I have a bike specifically built to facilitate touring with a camera. This is a cheap Manfrotto tripod rather than my expensive one, used while making sure that the idea worked. The camera goes in the black canvas sack above the tripod, BTW. One thing no-one else has mentioned is mounting the tripod vertically ...


5

I suggest starting with a prototype made out of square tube and old bikes, especially if this is your first framebuilding project. Square tubing is a bit easier to work with (you spend less time mitring tubes) and the goal for the prototype is that it should be easy to build. Take shortcuts, in other words. Get something you can ride, then ride it. When ...


5

There are trailers in a similar form factor, like the Burley Travoy (no recommendation, just the first I found), that are made for the purpose. These will be a lot more stable than any home made conversion of something that was never designed to go faster than slow walking pace.


5

For my daily commute and for moderate sized weekly grocery trips I use two waste baskets, permanently mounted, each with 6 gallon capacity. They serve as waterproof hard shells into which I can insert any bags, backpacks, clothes etc, that I want.


5

I trust you used the search function and read "How do you carry a dog on a bike"? I haven't ridden with a big dog since I was a child, but I have a friend who had one. My experience was that when the dog weighed about the same as I did my ability to ride was entirely dependent on the co-operation of the dog. In my case that was not usually a problem, but ...


5

I suggest cutting the broken loop off and using a cable ("zip") tie through the big triangular loop. Two cable ties chained together may help it lie flatter. As an alternative a short loop of bungee cord would also do the trick (available from camping shops). Thats actually nicer than most lock holders, and seems worth saving. Edit:Picture:


5

tl;dr: Yes, cargo on the rack will affect the ride and the feeling. Your body comfort won't be affected at all. Riding with backpack will reduce your comfort but it won't affect the feeling of the bike. I would recommend carrying all supplies in the in-frame or saddle bag. If you have locker, have clothes in there and change them once a week. You will have ...


5

Yes, that's a proprietary system. That said, front racks and baskets that mount to the head tube are very stable. The rack basket doesn't flop around when parked and it doesn't affect steering when you're riding. Unfortunately there aren't standard head tube mounts (Brompton has one design for example). Until a standard emerges, this is the best we can do ...


5

According to Bikes At Work: Our experience has been that most people can comfortably pull 300 lbs (137 kg) with a typical mountain bike and cargo trailer or cargo trike. How quickly a person can move load of that weight will depend on his or her physical condition. Someone in reasonable physical condition can generally pull a 300 lb load at 10 mph (16 km/...


5

Yes, this "lockring" is important. It functions like the stem on a regular bike (with a threadless fork) to hold the headset together. The cap on top is used during adjustment, but is not intended to hold everything together. See this description from Park for more details of headset adjustment: https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/threadless-headset-...


4

I'm adding an answer, and note that it is still in progress. First, there is currently a global pandemic, and riders may be interested in doing long solo rides, or they may be interested in more lightly-supported rides. Gravel cycling has become much more prominent, and organized gravel rides typically have longer distances between stops than a road century. ...


4

I carry: Two water bottles (on accelerade, one Nuun) Tail wedge, with multi-tool, patch kit, tire levers, spare tube, CO2 inflator, emergency food (sport beans), wallet, keys. Bento box with cell phone, drugs (salt tablets, ibuprofen, sinus) Pump mounted on one water bottle cage. jersey pockets with powdered accelerate, Nuun tablets, real food. I'll ...


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