48

At our shop, we suggest a new cassette every 2 times you replace your chain, IF you stay on top of your maintenance schedule. With 99% of customers this would mean a new cassette every 1-2 years depending on how much you ride it. If you are a commuter and ride everyday, your timeframe for replacement gets much smaller. We would also assess the condition of ...


36

If you want to maximize your max. speed, go for an 11 tooth cog. If you want to maximize your average speed, unless you're a pro you probably are better off without it. Even cruising at 40km/h does not require and 11 tooth cog. For example, take a look at this table, showing cruising1 speeds for a 11- 21 tooth cassette: And compare to this table for a 12 - ...


34

In all likelihood, the cassette is new. The cassette is manufactured this way. The difference in teeth shape and depth is to assist the chain take-up when you change gears. Look for wear marks on the ramps and grime between the cogs - a new cassette should be clean with no marks. While it could be possible to clean a used cassette to 'new' condition, (...


28

Most of the noise comes from pawls on the freewheel hitting against the splines on the engagment surfaces which makes up the racheting unit. Some reasons for the noise between freewheels? Tension on pawls could be higher causing more noise as they glide over the engagment surfaces High end freewheels have more pawls and engagement points than lower end ...


27

Early cassettes (Suntour Accushift and Shimano Uniglide being some commonly encountered examples) weren't like this. The splines were all the same and there was no hunting for the little spline or big gap. To summarize a bunch of history, these cassettes were current at the same time as early indexed shifting. Accushift and early Shimano SIS both ...


26

In most cases with bicycle parts, more expensive means lighter. There can be exceptions, especially when you get to the super low end parts where cheaper can also mean cheaper construction. Since you put so many miles on your bike and it seems important to you, I would spend the extra 2 pounds and grab the Acera. XT is generally used on mountain bikes where ...


25

No, it shouldn't be necessary to replace a cassette after a month's use. However, unless you've had bad service from this shop in the past, I'd give them the benefit of the doubt and assume that it was a mistake, not a scam. Bike shops deal with a lot of badly maintained bikes so I guess they're pretty much used to giving the "you need a new cassette" spiel ...


23

For me, and for many riders that come through my shop, the 11-25 is missing the critical 16t cog, which (at least for me) is the sweet spot. That is, the gear which I don't tend to spin out of, and that doesn't turn in to a grind fest. If I'm doing a Euro trip, then I will run an 11-28, with a compact front. But at home, for daily riding, a standard 53/39 ...


22

If you imagine a cassette, will have a bunch of sprockets on it. The current 105 range (which came out last year) will have 11 sprockets, the earlier 105 had 10 sprockets. The notation you've noticed simply means that for one of these cassettes, the smallest sprocket has 11 teeth, the largest has 32 teeth. And the second cassette has smallest sprocket 12 ...


21

I think these may be what you're looking for. FYI, a lot of this information is available with a little searching. Depending on what exactly you are looking for, you might want to look up a document for a specific cassette as the numbers might be slightly different. Spacer widths (From Shimano tech docs) 8 Spd: 3.00mm 9 Spd: 2.56mm 10 Spd: 2.35mm (1.0mm ...


18

From Sheldon Brown: Spoke Protector A plastic or sheet-metal disc that fits between the cluster and the right-side spokes of a rear wheel. This is intended to prevent the derailer or chain from getting caught in the spokes, possibly causing very extensive/expensive damage/destruction to the wheel, the derailer, and the frame. A spoke ...


17

They are there to help facilitate shifting. Basically, the ramps you see help when going from a smaller to larger sprocket by catching the side plates of the chain to help the chain be pulled up onto the larger cog. Another place where you will see atypical teeth is in the front; some are shorter/different shaped than others to help shifting as well. ...


16

Use the correct tool. There really is no other good answer. Bodges that could get the old one off, maybe a hammer and cold chisel - likely to upset the threads on the freehub. a grinder and cutoff disk - guaranteed to damage the freehub, plus throws sparks and metal shavings into the mechanism. I've actually done this to a cheap bike where all I needed ...


16

You cannot get a higher gear ratio by replacing the cassette. The 11 tooth sprocket is the smallest you can get on a compatible cassette. (Systems with 10 tooth sprockets exist but use a different freehub design). The issue is that you have 46/30 tooth sub-compact chainrings (I looked up specs here). Which are giving you the low ratios. This is common on ...


16

In my experience - breakage is not directly correlated to wear. I've had bikes with unknown mileage on them, and have chosen to ride the transmission into the ground. Generally the performance slowly deteriorates, with chain slip under power being a sign that things are getting bad. Unlike other answerers, I've never had a worn transmission break and strand ...


14

Assuming you have Shimano-compatiple Hyperglide cogs: No, you can't. The cassette body is not symmetric, the cassette fits in only one position. You could resort to adapt the cogs with a file, though. But shifting will be problematic at least, the cogs have certain indents to make shifting smoother.


14

Theoretically, you could shorten your chain to accommodate the smaller (largest gear) cassette. However, I never install a new cassette unless I install a new chain as well. Cassettes and chains tend to "wear" to one another and one can sometimes encounter difficulty if you don't. That "could" be the issue with your new chain. If the old chain was run ...


14

Gear ratio range. If you decrease the chainring sizes you decrease the highest ratios available. It's not possible to make the gap between the chainrings much bigger and get decent front shifting so the large ring has to shrink with the small one. It's easier for manufacturers to make a wide ratio cassette that retains an 11 tooth sprocket and shifts ...


14

You really will struggle to complete this task without the proper tools, I can't actually imagine how you would do it successfully. Criggie's answer helpfully details some good ways to go about borrowing the tools. However... As people have suggested in the comments, if you are changing to an 11-speed cassette, you need to change the shifter(s) and ...


13

If you want to change your cassette to something with more gears, then you will need to replace the rear shifter and possibly the rear derailleur. A cheaper option would be to get a wider range cassette which still has 8 gears. You'll have bigger jumps between the gears, but you'll have a bigger range of gears. With a wider range cassette, you may need a ...


13

You have the wrong tool. Your cassette lockring removal tool has a long pin emerging from its centre, which would fit inside the axle of a QR compatible wheel, to keep the tool centred. What you have named a skewer is actually the axle and yours is solid, so the axle blocks the tool. The correct and simple way to remove your cassette is to get an ...


13

Yes. The cassette teeth are clearly worn, and the large chainring teeth have worn into characteristic shark fin shape. If you use new chain with these, it will skip. The small chainring looks still good.


12

Over time an old chain and cassette wear together, so you don't notice the wear until it gets really bad. When you replace the chain while leaving the old cassette the tooth profile is no longer correct and the new chain will skip off of the teeth, especially under load. Unfortunately it won't get better and the only recourse is to replace the cassette as ...


12

From Stan's NoTubes FAQs on wheels and rims: Why is my cassette digging into my freehub body? Stan's freehubs are made lightweight using aluminum like many other brands. We recommend using cassettes with a rigid alloy carrier (XTR, XT, XO, etc. - Figure 1) for the largest sprockets. Cassettes with individual cogs (Figure 2) may mark the ...


12

For grades beyond 10% having a gear that you can spin at the rate you can climb makes a big difference. Only you can know exactly what gear that should be. If you can find a gear ratio tool that displays speeds for a given gear, wheel size and rpm. This one seems pretty good. http://www.bikecalc.com/cadence_at_speed Then think about your typical speeds ...


12

There is a limit to the amount of tension a given chain should be put under. Smaller chainrings increase that force - the pedal arm and chainring form a lever, and the smaller the chainring (and longer the pedal arm) the more force will be applied to the chain given a fixed force on the pedal. What you might be gaining in terms of chainring and cassette ...


11

There does not appear to be anything wrong with the cassette. Shimano helpfully put some nice clear pictures of individual sprockets on the product page for the CS-58000 cassette. https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/product/component/105-5800/CS-5800.html You can easily see that the smaller sprockets have some 'chisel' shaped teeth. Clicking at the rear ...


11

As long as the crank arms, chain and freewheel turn freely and all as one. Without clunk's, slipping or sticking at any point there should be no need to replace any of it. The surface rust will not prevent it being fit for purpose and should wear off with use and some decent lubricant. You could always try a wire brush to remove surface rust without having ...


11

You mostly answered your own question: the racing market drives the industry, sometimes to the detriment of the availability of real-world gearing. A major compounding factor is that there are a lot of hoops a person has to jump through to get smaller rings on their road bike, starting with buying new, weird, mostly old or retro cranks. Making things work ...


11

No sorry, this is not practical. Freewheels mostly stopped at 7 speed, and 8 speed was rare because of excess unsupported axle causing bent axles due to leverage. Your suggested plan would require fitting 8 speed shifters and an 8 speed rear mech. That's too much faffing about when you want to swap wheels. Instead, you could find an 11 speed hub with the ...


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