8

Generally speaking, a frame/wheel hub that is fitted with a 8/9/10 speed cassette can take any of 8/9/10 speed because they're all the same width, just pack an extra cog or two in by thinning down the chain and inter-cog spacing. 11 may be possible but it depends on how the cassette can overhang inboard of the freehub without grinding. 12/13/14 speed is ...


5

The cassette does not look worn out A cassette that is worn does not look worn. It'll skip anyway despite not looking worn. I suspect your cassette is simply too worn. (Interestingly, for chainrings the opposite is true: a chainring can look very visibly worn due to the non-even wearing at different crank orientations, and still work.) The new chain barely ...


4

All common 9 speed cassettes use the same freehub body. Also, trekking bikes normally use MTB parts, so there is no problem there. The Acera line is an MTB line. The manufacturers normally only distinguish (with some exceptions) road/MTB/urban and other bikes like hybrid, trekking, gravel, cyclocross take many components from those lines with only a few ...


3

You can simply get any 9 speed cassette. All 9 speed parts are pretty much interchangeable. Edit: Except for Campagnolo, as per Carel’s comment. You’ll also need a new chain (which you’ll have to shorten to the right length). If you go for a cassette with bigger sprockets you’ll have to make sure that your existing derailleur has enough capacity.


3

Focusing on the quote below: I am looking at 9 speed because I seem to remember someone saying to me that 9 speed is the most my frame will accommodate... Fortunately, this is wrong. Rear dropout spacing for rim brake road bikes is still 130mm. The frame is not the issue. You could put a 12s group on that frame if you were willing to buy one. It would be ...


3

Jockey wheels with bushings are pretty common. (NB for readers not familiar: bushings, aka plain bearings, just have the axle rotate within a plastic or bronze sleeve rather than supported by bearings. The bushing materials are self-lubricating.) Also, the plastic in question is a pretty common material for jockey wheels, and it is not intrinsically fragile ...


2

After two years of trial en error i got the culprit: The last three cogs of the cassette come as a trio. This trio touches the back of the body at designated areas (see left side of picture below). When I apply a little grease on all of these areas before putting on the trio (see right side of picture below), the crackling sound disappears. After a few ...


2

This sounds like a situation where you should have a professional bike mechanic look at the problem. If you have attempted to resolve the problem by adjusting both the correct limit screw (you did make sure you were adjusting the correct limit screw, right?) and the indexing via the barrel adjuster, then something else is wrong. One possibility is that ...


2

When you are on the largest chainring and largest sprocket the rear derailleur should look very extended. Some movement should still be possible. It should shift freely from second largest to largest sprocket and you should be able to e.g. push the chain to the chainstay. On the small-small combination the derailleur shouldn’t be completely folded, i.e. ...


2

34 is likely too much. Nowadays short-cage Shimano RDs tend to allow 28 and 32 could somehow work, as the specs are very conservative, but 34 is likely too much. The extender should work, but the shifting will not be that precise.


1

The skipping may come progressively often because you apply progressively more power (higher gears). I assume you are trying the smaller cogs at similar speeds. Chain length may be an issue, but most likely the issue is the cassette. If your old chain skipped a lot, it is almost sure that it abraded a lot of of material from the cassette, especially when ...


1

Shimano's published method for establishing chain length is based on adding links to the length that will wrap around large/large sans derailleur. When a bigger cassette is swapped in on a chain sized that way, the chain will typically be too short, and breaking your chain, derailleur, hanger, and/or frame may result. The alternative is to do the technically ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible