34

In all likelihood, the cassette is new. The cassette is manufactured this way. The difference in teeth shape and depth is to assist the chain take-up when you change gears. Look for wear marks on the ramps and grime between the cogs - a new cassette should be clean with no marks. While it could be possible to clean a used cassette to 'new' condition, (...


19

In my experience - breakage is not directly correlated to wear. I've had bikes with unknown mileage on them, and have chosen to ride the transmission into the ground. Generally the performance slowly deteriorates, with chain slip under power being a sign that things are getting bad. Unlike other answerers, I've never had a worn transmission break and strand ...


17

You cannot get a higher gear ratio by replacing the cassette. The 11 tooth sprocket is the smallest you can get on a compatible cassette. (Systems with 10 tooth sprockets exist but use a different freehub design). The issue is that you have 46/30 tooth sub-compact chainrings (I looked up specs here). Which are giving you the low ratios. This is common on ...


14

Despite the "hell will freeze over" warnings (it doesn't) it is worth considering why you ride a bike, and why you ride an 11- or 12-speed bike when a 9 speed will do the job just fine before going too deeply into the cost vs performance tradeoffs of when to change the chain. You are clearly aware the that shifting performance will deteriorate once ...


13

Yes. The cassette teeth are clearly worn, and the large chainring teeth have worn into characteristic shark fin shape. If you use new chain with these, it will skip. The small chainring looks still good.


13

Yes - after that mileage you will need both a new chain and new cassette. A new chain on the old cassette will not mesh right, and accelerate wear on the new chain. Depending how much chain elongation has accrued, you may need new chainrings too. They wear slower because more teeth are engaged in the chain. Look at the chainring and see if the scallops are ...


12

In the ideal case, the chain will not actually be rubbing significantly against the chainrings under load. As the chain wears, the spacing between the chain links becomes different from the tooth spacing, and this difference in spacing means that there is sliding contact as the teeth engage the chain. The rollers inside the chain help to convert some of this ...


12

It sounds like you're talking about the tooth difference, and not the horizontal spacing between cogs. Most cassettes are "uneven" in this sense. It does not affect indexed shifting, so long as the derailer can accommodate the max number of links difference and can "reach" as high as the largest cog.


11

I don't know why you think bicycle degreaser products are 'weaker for more money' when you have basically proved to yourself that gasoline (petrol) is a very poor cleaner because it evaporates very quickly. I've had success with a basic citrus degreaser available at Home Depot that costs $4 for a reasonably sized bottle. It's effective at loosening dirty ...


10

All nine speed Shimano shifters index with all pre-ten-speed Shimano MTB derailleurs. All nine speed long cage MTB derailleurs with long (SGS) cages will have total capacity sufficient to run any cassette they can clear with a double in front. 36t large cog cassettes came out late in 9-speed mountain's life. Only a very few Shimano 9 MTB derailleurs are ...


9

For 11s MTB cassette on road 11s HG hub, use 1.85mm spacer. Bike-Components.de lists the following: 1 mm: Thickness: 1 mm Application: using a 10-speed (Road) cassette with aluminium spider (e.g. CS-7800, CS-7900) on an 8-/9-/10-speed freehub using a 10-speed (Road) cassette on an 11-speed (Road) freehub (1 mm + 1.85 mm) Manufacturer Part Number: Y-...


8

Gears are measured in terms of the number of teeth, not the width. The mechanical advantage is given by the number of teeth on the front chainring divided by the number of teeth at the back. Often this is then multiplied by the diameter of the tyre, to give a measurement in 'gear inches'. Your bike looks to have a 14t-28t freewheel. Your rear derailleur is a ...


8

All the functionality degradation symptoms of worn chains given in other answers here do not mention one more, possibly more psychological or ergonomic aspect of it. Namely the drivetrain noise. A heavily worn chain will be loud. No amount of lubricant will silence it for longer than a short period of time. Elongated chain links will rub along the teeth. The ...


8

The tool you have looks to be for freewheels. Here’s a photo of a known good cassette tool (Park Tool FR-5.2): See how the splines are way deeper than your tool’s? The other large tool you have is likely a bottom bracket tool and is not for cassettes at all.


8

The other posters are probably right. But, if you haven't money to burn, I would replace the chain first and see how it goes. You say you keep it clean and well lubed so damage to the front chainrings are less likely and unless you seldom change gear, the cassette may be good enough to last another chain. Have a look at the teeth to see if they look like ...


8

My experience with swapping wheels is disappointing. I had to adjust the derailleur (limit screws, cable tension) and rim brakes (due to slight difference in rim width and dish) every time I swapped wheels. Maybe if you have exactly the same hub and rims on both wheels it will work better. I think my derailleur adjustments were necessary because the cassette ...


8

Generally speaking, a frame/wheel hub that is fitted with a 8/9/10 speed cassette can take any of 8/9/10 speed because they're all the same width, just pack an extra cog or two in by thinning down the chain and inter-cog spacing. 11 may be possible but it depends on how the cassette can overhang inboard of the freehub without grinding. 12/13/14 speed is ...


7

Sounds like the easy solution is going to be get an extra long lockring. Wheels Mfg and another company I can't remember both used to offer them. I believe current Chris King ones are longer than average but I couldn't come up with a number. Double check your wheel dish is right, because if it happened to be way over to the right, it could cause or ...


7

Assuming your cassette and freehub body are conventional, the cassette sits on a series of splines, and would be free to slide left/right if there were no locknut in the way. Since the hole in the cassette will be larger than the diameter of the freehub body, a missing or loose lockring will allow the cassette to twist out of the vertical plane parallel with ...


7

Turns out this derailleur needs a 'standard mount' derailleur pad/hanger. I have currently a direct mount. The Canyon representative thought the SRAM hanger was for 10 speed. To me, it is now clear that a 'SRAM' pad/hanger is the same as a Shimano 'standard mount'. So, I purchased the SRAM hanger (aka standard mount) from Canyon and it works!


7

CS-HG200 is black, CS-HG201 is silver. Otherwise they are the same.


7

The larger tooth count sprockets will provide lower gear ratios. Bigger sprocket in the rear: lower ratio. A lower ratio mean the bike goes slower for a given pedalling cadence, but you get more torque at the rear wheel. A larger largest sprocket also means the ratio gaps between gears get bigger - the intermediate sprockets all get proportionately larger ...


7

As the smallest cog and smallest chainring have not change changed size, the chain length will be no worse than it was previously. With the smaller large cassette cog, you may find you can shorten the chain, giving better small/small tension. The difference (presuming a reasonably sized chain to begin with) of dropping a link will be minor enough I doubt I ...


7

You can't use an 8 speed shifter with a 10 speed cassette. The space between individual cogs is smaller than on an 8 speed cassette. The shifter moves the derailleur a fixed distance per shift, so it can't reach the position of the cogs if they are not spaced as intended. The fact that you can use the 4 biggest and the smallest gear is pure luck, because the ...


6

I used a domestic hairdryer for 2/3 minutes , applied the extension and it finally gave. Would also advise against using a blowtorch as may damage components.


6

There's a sprung pawl mechanism that is responsible for allowing the cassette to drive the wheel in one direction and coast in the other direction. The problem you're having is indicative of something not right inside that mechanism. Possible examples are the pawls or springs being out of place, mangled, or not made to spec. Freehubs not breaking in ...


6

To do that you need to change the shifter and derailleur as well. Different brands, and different numbers of cogs on the rear require different amounts of pull on the gear cable to shift one gear, and the cogs, chain etc are all different sizes. This also means that the total cable moved to get from highest to lowest gear is generally also different. Note ...


6

Chains, cassettes, and chainrings are replaced to avoid sudden and catastrophic failure of the drivetrain. Sure, the chain might just slip a little, which might not be catastrophic, but catastrophic consequences are easily possible if something should suddenly and unexpectedly break. For starters, imagine what might happen if the rider were pedaling at full ...


6

There’s no need to worry about specified width. The bottom line is that any 10 speed chain from a reputable manufacturer (Shimano, SRAM, KMC, Wipperman) will work fine with a Shimano cassette.


6

The min large sprocket size that Shimano specifies for the RD-RX810 is 30 teeth. A 28 might work ok but I’d personally stick with 30. As others have mentioned swapping wheels is not plug and play. The disc rotor and cassette end up in slightly different lateral positions which requires derailleur and caliper adjustments. Using identical model hubs should ...


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