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1

So, despite what the question implies, I went ahead and waxed my old cassette with the chains, with mixed results. I gave the cassette a soak in mineral spirits, followed by denatured spirits and then soap water and a rinse in plain water to clean it, the same as I did with the chains. I made sure to write down where the plastic spacers were, but I have ...


5

The point of waxing is not to rustproof but to lubricate the chain's internals where they articulate. The rest of the wax flakes off quickly. So this wouldn't have the desired effect.


1

As already stated in Andrew Henles Answer this is expected behaviour as the chain is not guided towards the correct cog except by the fact that it is already on it. This should be sufficient to keep the chain on the correct cog if you back-pedal lightly. The problem of the chain changing gear when back-pedalling is aggravated though by increased friction in ...


3

For road bikes the subcompact cranks have a bolt circle of 110 mm diameter. The smallest chainring that fits is 34 teeth. There are cranks with smaller bolt circles and small chain rings available, but the selection is limited. Your proposed 42/26 is available in mountain bike cranks, but matching that with road cassettes is a challenge. The chainlines ...


10

There is a limit to the amount of tension a given chain should be put under. Smaller chainrings increase that force - the pedal arm and chainring form a lever, and the smaller the chainring (and longer the pedal arm) the more force will be applied to the chain given a fixed force on the pedal. What you might be gaining in terms of chainring and cassette ...


3

A road 11 speed compatible wheelset will have a freehub body that is 36.75mm wide. A 8/9/10 speed compatible wheelset will have a freehub body that is 34.95mm wide - 1.8mm narrower. You can fit 8, 9 and 10 speed cassettes on an 11 speed freehub body with the addition of a 1.8mm spacer.


2

You are correct about the cassette compatibility. If you are already shopping online, the easiest way is to do a web search for Shimano cassette spacer and pick one that adapts 8-10 speeds to 11-speed road freehub. It is possible that the wheelset already comes with such a spacer, so it is probably best to ask the seller first.


14

Gear ratio range. If you decrease the chainring sizes you decrease the highest ratios available. It's not possible to make the gap between the chainrings much bigger and get decent front shifting so the large ring has to shrink with the small one. It's easier for manufacturers to make a wide ratio cassette that retains an 11 tooth sprocket and shifts ...


11

You mostly answered your own question: the racing market drives the industry, sometimes to the detriment of the availability of real-world gearing. A major compounding factor is that there are a lot of hoops a person has to jump through to get smaller rings on their road bike, starting with buying new, weird, mostly old or retro cranks. Making things work ...


0

this exact thing happened with me and not only on trainer but on road when riding on higher gears. tried a lot of thing by my self and found out that sometimes chain links and bearing runs out of lube or lube doesn't get to that inner part again sometimes. so you could try this solution.


5

The most likely scenario is that the freehub/cassette on your trainer do not line up exactly the same as they do on your normal wheel, and you need to make small tweak to your indexing. In your second video, it definitely sounds like it is trying to change gear.


1

They're both freewheels, so likely the design has been around for decades. At this price point in the market, noone really compares features, a user is more interested in specs like max/min toothcount and number of cogs. Thats about it. Specs are identical - they're both 6 speed with 14 tooth minimum and 28 tooth maximum cogs. The TZ20 is probably a ...


2

The Wolverine is a road bike (or 'monster cross') not a MTB. The Soma web site says that the rear spacing is 135mm, I assume the BB shell width is 68mm. If that is the case you can run a Shimano road crank and road chain-line. Compatibility between the crank and cassette is not what you need to deal with. Presumably you are either thinking of installing an ...


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