Hot answers tagged

32

Details depend on the ride, but usually organized rides provide things that you'd have to provide yourself. This one appears to provide a lot. This is covered by the catchall term "support", as in a supported ride. The support that everyone enjoys is the food and drink along the way ("The Best Rest Stops") - scroll down on the page you linked, and you'll ...


26

A distance of 100 miles (161 km) is often referred to as a century. Century is also a common designation for 100 years, but that is not its exclusive meaning. The English word derives directly from Latin centuria, a group of 100 [etymonline]. This is a form of centum (or CENTVM if you will) which simply means (one)hundred. A ride of 100 miles is thus aptly ...


18

First, don't worry about the bike - worry about you. If you need a different bicycle, you'll figure that out pretty fast while you're training to do your 200-mile ride. What's the farthest you've ridden on that bike? 30 miles? Even 50 or 60 miles is only just getting to the edges of what riding 100 miles is like. Fatigue is cumulative - never mind just ...


15

I haven't done one of those big organized rides yet, but signed up for a local one in May (and a multi-day fundraising ride in September) and have volunteered helping out with some of that kind of ride before. Most basically, those events usually make it easier and let you concentrate on riding. "Heavy bicycle traffic" is also probably a good chance to ...


13

I would strongly advise against that. Your legs are not going to be the problem, and neither is your overall conditioning/strength. If you are going to be around other riders, you need to be able to stop and start and steer safely. Road bikes steer with your butt while MTB steer with handlebars. This is a big deal when you are tired and running on ...


9

I've almost done this, and its not "easy" but it should be possible. However a non-stop 100 km is much harder than simply doing 100 km. Try working up do it. I don't know what your current distance is for a "big ride" but start with 25 km non-stop, then work up to 50, 75, and then 100 km. Leave early in the morning on your big rides - it seems to help ...


9

Nothing - you're not missing anything; going out and riding 100 miles on your own is fine, but going out on an organised ride is a different experience. Maybe it's about the camaraderie, following someone else's route, not having to think about the route - just follow the signs or the provided GPX, the provided rest stops, mechanical support, accurate ...


8

No - that'd be like putting a Toyota rally driver into a F1 car, on race day. You'll be able to ride, but you won't be used to the nuances, as david1024 says, BUMSTEER. Road bikes need at least a week to get used to, and I went 500 km of riding in a month, before becoming comfortable on a road bike after being on MTBs for years. And I still go downhills ...


8

Take a "short cut". I commonly take a "short cut" on my 10-mile commute, riding up to a neighboring community and then down a bike trail, adding another 17 miles. Added: The advantage to this is that you're already dressed and on your bike, so the time required will be ONLY the additional time you actually spend on your bike. Get going 90 minutes earlier ...


8

If I read Google correctly, it isn't that a century necessarily means 100-years and a bike event borrowed from that. Instead, they are peers of one another. The Latin root, centum or centuria simply means 100. In a more generic sense, it can simply refer to any collection of 100 definition. Thus, a century in time is a collection of a common unit of time (...


8

How far have you ridden in a day? The bike will be fine, as the comments say the question is whether you will be. A road bike is more efficient and will get you there easier, but there are many people who could do the ride on a hybrid or worse. Are you one of them? Decades ago when I was in college I rode a century on a basic bike with a Sturmey-Archer 3 ...


7

I wouldn't bother adding in the commute miles. You should be focusing on getting your ride distances up, rather than nickle-and-diming a mile here or there. I went through one of these training routines for a charity ride 7 years ago; just follow their schedule and you'll get there. These things are tried and true. Hundreds of riders use them every year.


7

it would seem to me that nutrition, hydration, waste disposal and arm fatigue would be the greatest challenges Nutrition: isn't that hard, although if you haven't already, you might want to spend some time figuring out what food works for you on the move. You want things that are fairly calorie-dense, probably not too much fibre (see point #3) and agree ...


6

Its not the distance, its the time on the bike. Assuming this is not a solo ride, you'll be riding with other people either in a proper rotating bunch ride, or just on the same road/direction as them. This alone will increase your overall speed by as much as 20%. If you can be seated on a bike for 6 hours in a day, you can do this ride. You will need to ...


5

Organized rides are great. You get a lot of support in terms of rest stops, mechanical help, and medical assistance. A subset of this is charity rides. These are particularly nice because there are often people along the route cheering for you at various points along the way. On the other hand, riding solo is more challenging and you get the choose your ...


5

I once went for a recognition ride on a race track for a competition just a day before the actual event. The track was exactly the same, it was already marked and it did not cross any fence or busy street (it was a pure mountain biking race). Of course, I went to the competition the next day. The biggest difference was purely psychological, but big enough ...


5

Most likely sodium. However, a lot of it depends on the person. One person might need more of one electrolyte than another, so it's difficult to make a judgment on the order of your "most critical" electrolytes. A sweat test would be a great way of testing which it might be.


4

You've essentially just described the 100 mile time trial, which is fairly popular event in the British time trial scene (and perhaps elsewhere, too). The idea in a time trial is simply to complete the given course as quickly as possible. They're ridden on specialised TT bikes and are usually held on roads that have as few junctions as possible, so as to ...


4

Are you sure the weight is the real issue? Remember the weight you haul up a hill is the combined weight of the rider and bike, so cutting 15lbs off the bike will probably only be a change of around 7.5% in system weight - and you'll have a smaller choice of gears. Putting good road tyres on the MTB will make a bigger difference in energy used on the day. ...


4

I've ridden many sportives at this distance in the UK and here is my experience. Food/Drink Looking at the route map there are 3 food stops and 11 water stops so you don't need to carry loads with you. I'd say a 750ml bottle will do. If you find you drink a lot on your training rides then take a second bottle. Food will be available at the stops but you ...


4

This Cycleops document appears to show the speed-power curve for the Magneto trainer. A few comments: first, the actual power demanded will depend on the pressure between the tire and roller, so you will want to make sure that is consistent between trainer sessions. Second, note that the power increases roughly linearly with speed, so if you double your ...


4

Others have pointed out the reasons of support, camaraderie, learning, and fun. For me, the primary reason I sign up is social, but I'm also motivated by the idea of safety in numbers. I grew up about a mile from where Jill Behrman disappeared and that's always in my mind when I head out on a long solo ride on back country roads. It's nice to ride in rural ...


3

Ignore the commute miles and follow the training schedule. Maybe take it just a bit easier on your commute for the days with a training ride than you normally would. Whatever you do, don't give up the commutes. They help maintain your fitness throughout the week. I have never been in as good of shape as when I was training and commuting simultaneously.


3

I carry: Two water bottles (on accelerade, one Nuun) Tail wedge, with multi-tool, patch kit, tire levers, spare tube, CO2 inflator, emergency food (sport beans), wallet, keys. Bento box with cell phone, drugs (salt tablets, ibuprofen, sinus) Pump mounted on one water bottle cage. jersey pockets with powdered accelerate, Nuun tablets, real food. I'll ...


2

I did my first 100 miles in October, I didn't train enough and it was extremely painful and unpleasant. Get the miles in or suffer like hell. You have been warned.


2

I say go for it. If you can do a 50 mile ride, you can do a century. I will agree with @andy56 and say that this ride will be much different from any of your weekend rides. You're going to need to eat more and drink a ton, your backside will hate you, and it could be torture, but you can finish the ride. My first century I rode after a previous long ride ...


2

NO, you're not ready. I'm usually very encouraging for people to go for challenges, for example Training involved to ride 175 miles (281 km) in a day But your situation is more like 1/3 Century or Metric Century? Often, if you have to ask, the answer in no. You can think about it like this: for a given fitness level, each time you ride 50% further than ...


2

I've done pretty much exactly what you describe: training on a (really terrible old beat up MTB) and then using a rented road bike (totally different configuration, weight, etc.) for a century (RideLondon-Surrey 100) with no problems. I can't see how I wold have survived riding that distance (on those hills!) in my MTB. So I strongly recommend switching! ...


2

It would be advisable if: You like cycling You can stay in the saddle for 5 plus hours without crippling pain You can hold all bodily functions for that amount of time You can carry the required amount of calories and water Even better if you have a group of riders or a car tailing you. I'd say go for it!


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible