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57

You're probably thinking of narrow-wide chainrings: Modern chains have inner and outer links. On a conventional chainring, all of the teeth are the same width, and therefore have to be narrow enough to fit into the chain's inner links. This means that there's enough space for the chain to move about a bit from side to side on the chainring, which can ...


52

If this happened over the course of 1 ride, it sounds like the wheel just slipped forward in the dropouts. If you loosen both nuts on the rear wheel axle and pull it backwards evenly, you should be able to retension the chain to proper working specs. Then just tighten it back to a torque of pretty f**ckin tight so it doesn’t slip again!


46

At our shop, we suggest a new cassette every 2 times you replace your chain, IF you stay on top of your maintenance schedule. With 99% of customers this would mean a new cassette every 1-2 years depending on how much you ride it. If you are a commuter and ride everyday, your timeframe for replacement gets much smaller. We would also assess the condition of ...


39

What harm could it possibly do? The cranks are held firmly in place by the bottom bracket; the back wheel is held firmly in place in the drop-outs. The chain is completely non-structural: all it does is transmit power from the pedals to the rear wheel. The only issues I can think of are make sure you know how to remove and replace it, obviously; I pretty ...


30

I think that I stretched the chain. No, you most likely did not. Bicycle chains are very strong (and chains on children's bicycles are usually similar to chains on adult bicycles). Plus, if a chain is really overloaded, the links will separate (i.e. the chain will tear) before the force is great enough to actually stretch the chain material (which is ...


29

When disconnected, a chain master link looks like this: Opening this style requires pressure between the two pins, parallel to the length of the chain. The proper tool is a special pair of pliers like this: And in use look like this:


29

I use a tool made out of a steel wire clotheshanger to squeeze the two pins together and open the link. Also, that one hanger turned into three tools: the link opener, a tool to hold the ends of an open chain together, and one to hang the cleaned-and-drying chain from the tree over the driveway.


28

The coating is generally a form of wax, which is an excellent chain lube, and less apt to attract dirt than most chain oils. All you really should do is wipe off (with a dry cloth) any excess. If the wax seems excessively heavy you can add a little solvent to the cloth, to just wipe off the outer coating. You want to leave the lube on the inside of the ...


28

Belt drive + Internally Geared Hub is a popular combination. Existing systems are based around a gates carbon belt drive. See the Breezer Beltway series bikes. Also Reeb Cycles began offering belt drives for mountain bikes when they first came to market. Also, now there is a breakable belt system called Veer that doesn't require a frame cutout (though uses ...


27

Sheldon Brown says no (http://sheldonbrown.com/chains.html): This factory lube is superior to any lube that you can apply after the fact. Some people make the bad mistake of deliberately removing this superior lubricant. Don't do this!


26

In most cases with bicycle parts, more expensive means lighter. There can be exceptions, especially when you get to the super low end parts where cheaper can also mean cheaper construction. Since you put so many miles on your bike and it seems important to you, I would spend the extra 2 pounds and grab the Acera. XT is generally used on mountain bikes where ...


25

Don't overthink it. Since you've got a triple, you're probably right to be in your middle ring most of the time That's normal. In the middle ring you should have access to the whole cassette/freewheel in the back, though you might get a little extra noise as you approach the extreme gears in either direction. You'll use the big chainring when you're going ...


25

The secret is simple, you need to: place the master link (the part with the pins) with the opening towards you, bend (flex) the chain so the open ends of the pins come closer to each other, put the flat part of the master link, release the bend allowing the pins to snap into the flat part of the master link. Since one picture saves 1000 words, they ...


24

Distance depends on how you look after the bike and what your local conditions are. Buy a chain wear gauge (plenty of other brands available) and replace the chain when it's stretched by 0.5%.


23

This is always a controversial topic, with some people arguing on both sides, but in my opinion you should replace your chain when it reaches the official "worn" state (as indicated by a chain stretch gauge). If you let the chain go the sprockets develop a "hook" and will begin "sucking" the chain. In addition, shifting performance will suffer. If a chain ...


23

It's safer and way easier just to buy another MissingLink (KMC's name for their master link design) of the same type (pin length) the chain came with, leaving you with an inner link that has one on either end. They're around $2US. In addition to saving the trouble of getting the pin back in there, there's also the question of the integrity of modern outer ...


23

No, it shouldn't be necessary to replace a cassette after a month's use. However, unless you've had bad service from this shop in the past, I'd give them the benefit of the doubt and assume that it was a mistake, not a scam. Bike shops deal with a lot of badly maintained bikes so I guess they're pretty much used to giving the "you need a new cassette" spiel ...


21

I think these may be what you're looking for. FYI, a lot of this information is available with a little searching. Depending on what exactly you are looking for, you might want to look up a document for a specific cassette as the numbers might be slightly different. Spacer widths (From Shimano tech docs) 8 Spd: 3.00mm 9 Spd: 2.56mm 10 Spd: 2.35mm (1.0mm ...


21

First things first: A belt is probably slightly less efficient than a properly installed clean chain. The test you link already indicates that. Probably with the tension Gates requires you'll loose a bit more power. On to your question: The chain is 200 grams heavier than the belt, of course with the chain you get gears, which you don't get with a belt ...


21

I have been using paraffin wax this year on my "fast" road bike as a bit of an experiment. This was using the hot wax approach, where paraffin wax was melted (in a slow cooker) and a clean chain dipped in the hot wax. Pros Very clean drive train, even after 2000 km the cassette and rings sparkle. Straight paraffin (i.e., without bees wax) does not attract ...


19

You need to bend the chain. Look at this link (PDF) for the Connex Snap On which is the same idea. The PDF is reproduced below in case the thing goes down. As an aside, you normally can get an alternative standard quick link (like a SRAM 8 speed powerlink) for these chains, rather than the Snap on type.


19

A worn, stretched chain will accelerate wear on sprocket and chainring teeth. There will then be a greater chance that the chain will slip off of and override the sprocket teeth as you apply a power stroke through the crank. When this happens the pedal and your foot suddenly slips downward, which could throw you off the bike, especially if you were off the ...


18

You may need to change your cassette with your chain due to damage, but only if your bike has missed out on some previous maintenance. If you ride one chain beyond the point of wear, it will damage both cassette and chain rings to different degrees. Your chain is a consumable component on your bike. For most people, 1200-1500 kilometers on a chain is a ...


18

Put link into chain, hold chain on either side, use thumbs to hold snaplock over link. Gently pull chain using thumbs as fulcrums...this will put pressure on the pins forcing them just a tiny bit inward. Snaplock should slide over. (Think of it kind of like bending but not breaking a pencil...both hands on pencil (chain), thumbs next to each other, gentle ...


18

Your high CC-2 reading likely relates to how much pressure are applying. The CC-2 device is not particularly solid and its readings are sensitive to how much pressure you apply to the pivoting gauge. From the manual: Instructions Set pivoting gauge so “0” is visible in viewing window. Lower CC-2 so fixed pin rests between chain’s inner plates. ...


18

You have a zero cost solution, which is to keep the front derailleur but remove the cable (and shifter if you like). Then use the FD limit screws to fix it in the right position to act as a chain guide. You don't need a 1x chainring, in fact using one with a 7 speed chain is probably less than ideal, so you're actually better off sticking with an existing ...


18

The chain is too long. Presumably you did not cut it down to size it when you installed it. All chains are sold with excess length and must be sized to the bike. The length required depends on the length of the chainstays and size of the largest chainring and sprocket. The easiest way to size the chain is making it the same length as the old chain. You can ...


17

Yes. You should follow the normal guidelines for oiling your chain. If it is squeaking, you know you've left it too long. Do the following every two or three weeks: Thoroughly clean the chain with some degreaser. Let it dry off. If the new lube comes into contact with degreaser, they won't be happy with one another, and the lubrication will not be as good. ...


17

The excess oil collects grit from the road, which acts as an abrasive that will wear out the chain.


17

As a general rule you get about 2000 miles out of a chain, but this depends on the chain, it's maintenance, and the use and storage conditions. It's not out of line for certain brands of chains to need replacement in 1300 miles, since some are either cheaper (and hence more poorly constructed) or more expensive (and hence lighter, with less "meat"). And ...


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