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10

This is because the chain is too long. You would shorten the chain to stop it touching the derailleur like this, but you also want to avoid this gear combination of the small chain ring and the small rear cog anyway; it is called cross-chaining and not desirable. In any other gear combination this problem will likely go away because the excess chain length ...


5

Taking a piece of chain can be useful one day, but what is the likelihood? I say take a multitool with a chain-breaking tool, that you verified you are actually strong enough to use (some have very small leverage) and a quicklink. That's good enough for normal rides, unless you are going for a week on your own. Many other people don't take anything. Assess ...


5

I've managed that before more often than I'd like to admit. Normally you can wiggle the chain free, though it does take some force and may damage paint. Pull some slack in the chain by moving the derailleur forwards, or it will pull back on the chain you are trying to free up. You've tried removing the middle and outer chainrings, but I think not the ...


4

If your chain is coming off of the single front sprocket, you probably need to tighten the chain or get a new chain. Use a chain checker to see if your chain is stretched out and needs to be replaced. If not, some bike frames have a longer space instead of just a single hole where the back wheel can move a bit. Just loosen the back wheel and see if it can ...


3

Happened to me a couple times. It depends on your frame and the gap between the bottom bracket and the chainring, but usually it can be fixed without removing the whole crank arm and chainring. What I usually do is pull the chain downwards from below and the rear part of the frame and gradually try to make my way forwards until the chain gets freed. It ...


3

Get a small chain-tool to remove a broken link, like the one in your multitool, two or three adequate quick-links for the chain width that you use and the bit of chain that remained after you shortened your new chain to the correct length. Workshop quality chaintools are quite heavy to carry on a bike tour and the likelyhood of needing one rather small. As ...


2

You can determine the proper chain length by following the technique used to size chains when they are installed - in a modify way, as you will have a joined chain. Before doing that make sure the B-screw is adjusted correctly so that the upper jockey wheel is not hitting the largest sprocket. Put the rear derailleur on the largest sprocket, take a couple ...


2

Z6: from http://kmcchain.us/chain/z6-br-gy/ Z7: from http://kmcchain.us/chain/z7-2/ I think the only real difference is colour: Z6 is "silver" Z7 is "grey/brown" This is important to some people. Note, Z6 was renamed from Z33, and Z7 was formerly called Z50. I think your links show the wrong image for Z6 - the KMC site shows plain chain without slots, ...


1

You need to adjust the derailleur B-screw. That adjusts the distance between the top jockey wheel and sprockets. Winding in the B-screw will move the jockey wheel away from the sprocket. The gap should be ~5mm. See https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/rear-derailleur-adjustment. The last section deals with B-screw adjustment. You are correct that you ...


1

It makes no real difference - the rollers in a chain turn all the way around, and the wearing surface is the internal diameter of the roller, not the external diameter of the pin. There are some fancy chains which have a marked outside and an inside, and may state a top and bottom too, but this is more about matching the shifting lands and pins and ramps on ...


1

I think this was a pre-existing condition in your drivetrain that you just didn't notice before removing the wheel. Have you tried riding the bike and seeing if it functions as before, when the right way up and pedalling forward? There does seem to be resistance in the jockey wheels in the derailleur cage. You can try removing, cleaning and re-lubricating ...


1

I suspect that the hub bearings are wonky and are causing the axle to twist. This will tend to unscrew the right side fixing bolt.


1

I would just like to share my experience with the Gazelle Chamonix C7 which I bought just over two weeks ago from a certified dealer in London. I have unfortunately had an issue within a week as a direct result of this new and "innovative" FlowLine chain case. Due to having to fit everything in there, in a much tighter space, there is a metal piece where a ...


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