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10

If you cannot control the rear cog's position, you can try moving the front chainring to tune the chain tension. That is, get an eccentric bottom bracket: By rotating it in the frame, the distance between rear and front cogs can be tuned. The same idea is achieved by eccentric rear hubs, e.g. White Ind. Eno: The hub choices below offer those of you ...


10

The short answer, is you generally cannot make a fixie out of a frame with vertical dropouts. Not only do you need to tension the chain, but the spacing of the axle of the bottom bracket and rear wheel varies, depending on your selection of cog and chainring tooth counts. Adjusting tooth counts will allow you to try to fine adjust the spacing, but it won't ...


4

I am not sure that any of the additives that you mentioned are necessary. You already have fluid flushing through the open spaces of the chain. I'd recommend just changing your degreasing solution and shaking the chain again, several times if necessary. In addition, dirt between the link plates may not matter as much. Most friction is generated between the ...


3

The main problem with an old chain is that it's stretched. As a result, it won't sit snugly on all the covered teeth of the sprocket, but only on the ones with the main load, and as you pedal the contact point slips a bit. Just fractions of a millimeter at each tooth, but with the considerable load and many thousands of revolutions, that's what wears out ...


2

Yes, you can use an 1/8" chain instead of 3/32", is the other way around you can't go. However, it may have problems going through your deraileur, but we can't say for sure. For normal single speed or fixies that's not a concern. I would use a normal 8 speed chain anyway, it'll probably be cheaper. Only get an 1/8" chain if you get track ...


2

Check for hair, grit, etc caught up in the derailleur wheels; most likely the guide pulley wheel; remove both wheels: attach the tension wheel last after cleaning/oiling. Make sure you pay attention to which wheels go where; and the direction arrow on the tension wheel. A google search will show you a diagram of both wheels labelled and the turning direction ...


1

The chain is constantly catching the derailleur, every few links or so. It's not a stiff link in the chain - unless the chain is made of stiff links. The chain does not look like it riding onto the next largest sprocket either. The derailleur is the new factor and it looks like the chain is catching in the cage. I'd check the jockey wheels are rotating ...


1

The amount of force required to plastically deform a steel chain is much more than a human can exert, even if you embedded the rear wheel in concrete so that all the force went into stretching the chain, rather than turning the wheel. Chain "stretch" is 100% caused by wear, with grit in the chain grinding down the rivets and sideplate openings. ...


1

Either the shifter, cable or derailleur is stuck. Detach the cable from the derailleur, check the derailleur will move through its full range of motion. Tension the cable by pulling in it with a pair of pliers. Work the shifter and check the cable is payed out and pulled in smoothly. You can also pull the cable housing away from the shifter to expose the ...


1

The small chainring in your picture looks fairly worn - not bad but not good. I can't see much of the big chainring to make a judgement there. Here's a silhouette of a sector of new chainring, with this one piece mirrored left-for-right. Compare this with yours: The top photo has a definite "up and to the right" look while the flipped second ...


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