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12

You did not mention the type of your chain, but yes, quicklinks normally also work for other brands. SRAM quicklinks are known to work for Shimano chains etc. Be aware that you must use 9-speed quicklinks for a 9-speed chain and similar. The widths differ so the the number of speeds must match. You can solve some problems with wrong chain installation also ...


4

It should be safe as long as the widths of the chain and the master link are the same. That is, if the chain is 10-speed, the master link must be 10-speed, and so on. From the legal perspective, I do not think that either vendor (Shimano/Wipperman) will accept warranty claims in a case when something would break. Unless they specifically claim such ...


4

I don’t think you need an eBike specific chain. Pro cyclists can achieve 1000W and huge torque in a sprint and they use lightweight road bike chains. Even with a 350W motor you are unlikely to reach similar levels. It looks like the e10 has beefier pins with "mushroom" riveting. The weight is basically identical (2.34g vs. 2.35g per link) and both ...


3

There's a great discussion of chains and lubrication at https://www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html His cleaning method, water and citrus-based cleaner in a soda bottle, is fast, convenient, neat, and highly effective. It gets grease off and grit out of the chain. The dirty water and cleaner can go down the drain. Then you can drip dry or heat if you're in a ...


2

When you are on the largest chainring and largest sprocket the rear derailleur should look very extended. Some movement should still be possible. It should shift freely from second largest to largest sprocket and you should be able to e.g. push the chain to the chainstay. On the small-small combination the derailleur shouldn’t be completely folded, i.e. ...


2

The cassette does not look worn out A cassette that is worn does not look worn. It'll skip anyway despite not looking worn. I suspect your cassette is simply too worn. (Interestingly, for chainrings the opposite is true: a chainring can look very visibly worn due to the non-even wearing at different crank orientations, and still work.) The new chain barely ...


2

The pic makes it unclear but I assume flopping the ring in to the middle position has been done and not helped. First you need to decide whether 52-18 is what you want. It probably isn't. Your answer may inform which route is more economical, since buying a new ring will cost some notable percent of what a new crank would cost. Also, figure out whether the ...


2

I kept having this problem after I changed to a new crank set. The new crank had a larger gap between the smallest chainring and the bottom bracket. I fixed the problem using a plastic wheelbarrow bushing that I cut to fit between the crank and the frame. It works great to keep the chain out of that little space.


2

I had a similar issue. I have a groupset Shimano 105 R7000 which worked very well with a SRAM chain (PC1130). When I changed the cassette for an Ultegra R8000 it made this noise. After trying a lot of things (lubbing and another SRAM chain) it turned out the SRAM chain was not compatible (or not so compatible) with the Ultegra R8000 cassette. Installing a ...


2

After two years of trial en error i got the culprit: The last three cogs of the cassette come as a trio. This trio touches the back of the body at designated areas (see left side of picture below). When I apply a little grease on all of these areas before putting on the trio (see right side of picture below), the crackling sound disappears. After a few ...


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