Hot answers tagged

17

In my experience - breakage is not directly correlated to wear. I've had bikes with unknown mileage on them, and have chosen to ride the transmission into the ground. Generally the performance slowly deteriorates, with chain slip under power being a sign that things are getting bad. Unlike other answerers, I've never had a worn transmission break and strand ...


11

Despite the "hell will freeze over" warnings (it doesn't) it is worth considering why you ride a bike, and why you ride an 11- or 12-speed bike when a 9 speed will do the job just fine before going too deeply into the cost vs performance tradeoffs of when to change the chain. You are clearly aware the that shifting performance will deteriorate once ...


6

Chains, cassettes, and chainrings are replaced to avoid sudden and catastrophic failure of the drivetrain. Sure, the chain might just slip a little, which might not be catastrophic, but catastrophic consequences are easily possible if something should suddenly and unexpectedly break. For starters, imagine what might happen if the rider were pedaling at full ...


5

All the functionality degradation symptoms of worn chains given in other answers here do not mention one more, possibly more phychological or ergonomic aspect of it. Namely the drivetrain noise. A heavily worn chain will be loud. No amount of lubricant will silence it for longer than a short period of time. Elongated chain links will rub along the teeth. The ...


4

I have done this exact thing, and it continues today due to lack of parts availability. (Cannondale F700 from 2000, my daily commuter bike). My chain and sprockets are so worn, they will only work with each other. The distance between chain rollers has increased and the sprocket teeth have worn to little points. I tried a new chain but it just jumps off ...


4

Personal experience: Worn drive train, chain thrown, caught in, and cracked carbon frame...$600 repair. Lesson learned. Keep track of mileage, maintain and replace as appropriate. Chain breakage is not really the issue. Chain rings last quite a bit longer than cassette and chain, in my experience. So, downside is a drive train failure that leads to a ...


3

Wearing down a chain means that it gets longer. And a longer chain does not fit on your sprockets anymore. With a chain-shift bike, the chain will tend to climb up the teeth of your sprocket, eventually skipping over the teeth, or falling off. Things are a bit different with single speed or IGH bikes: Single speed sprockets have longer teeth that make ...


3

Expanding on the comment by @DanielHicks, given the symptoms described, it sounds like you are talking about the shifting at the rear of the bike. Chances are that your rear derailer needs adjustment. Hopefully you don't force the chain on the correct cog by hand - that's what the derailer is for! In any case, when you push a shift lever, it pulls or ...


3

The previous answers appear to have missed the fact that with 11s and higher drivetrains, the current consensus appears to be replacing the chain once it hits 0.5% wear. At .75%, riders will frequently need a new cassette. While this obviously seems expensive, many 11s and higher cassettes are even more expensive. On the road, our outer chainrings are also ...


3

Looks identical to an early 90s MTB I ride. That too was 3x5 for 15 gears total. I found that 6/7/8 speed chain worked well enough with the 5 gear freewheel. But after decades of wear, the moving parts were a bit sloppy so when an opportunity arose, I fitted a 9 speed cassette and freehub wheel, with 9 speed chain/shifter/derailleur and its going nicely. ...


2

Sounds like there are two problems: chain coming off the rear sprockets and bad derailleur adjustment. These two things are very likely connected. A good reference for this type of repair is the Park Tool Repair Help article and videos on rear derailleur adjustment. The chain coming off may be caused by incorrect high or low limit settings, the chain jumping ...


2

The internal width of the chain will be fine, as this has not changed in decades, so it will roll over the cogs and jockey wheels. The problem will be the external width of the chain. It will probably not fit though the 11 Speed derailleur cage, and if it does is likely to rub in some gear combinations. According to Park Tools, 11speed is 5.5mm and 8 speed ...


2

I'm currently reading this book with much much much info about bike chains, their construction and how they wear: Everything you need to know about Bicycle Chains: A book of special insights for expert mechanics Kindle Edition by Johan Bornman (currently available to borrow for free if you have the Kindle Unlimited package) The book isn't perfect, but seems ...


1

I think this is a non-issue. If the 8 speed chain seems slightly too wide for the cage, which is quite likely, you can put a thin washer or spacer on each side of the jockey wheels (as the cage is split in two halves) or use 8sp specific aftermarket jockey wheels with the same number of teeth.


1

You can see the accepted answer in the question you've linked to mentions that the chains are waxed. It is quite possible to use wax on your chains yourself and some people do. However, it is a more involved and time consuming process than the typical process of using chain lube.


1

You can play around with chain-wrap and cable adjustment all you want but this problem is 99.999% of the time caused by wear on the cog's teeth. Ask your LBS if they can sell you only the cogs you need. It may seem like the cassette isn't old enough to justify being worn out, but that's a 10 tooth cog you're talking about, a tiny piece of thin metal ...


1

Do I really need to repeat old wisdom?! 9 chains PER 3 cassettes PER 1 chainring cluser Look at the prices of the parts. A worn chain wears everything down. A worn "everything" wears down the chain. A worn down "everything" shifts badly with a new chain. DO switch your chain when it hits the 1% mark at the latest. The rest ... meh.


1

Replacing a chain is much cheaper than replacing a whole drive train so it does not make sense to completely wear out your chain as if you do this you'll definitely need to replace the whole lot. As your drive train wears down (and as other answers say) your chain will likely slip in the most worn gears whilst under load, shifting performance will ...


1

Z7 is one of if not the only 7-speed specific chains still made. It won't work right on 8-speed.


1

I will attempt to summarize what one should look for in a lubricant without making specific product recommendations. In the past, lubricants have been classified as wet and dry. Wet lubes are like oils. Dry lubes are thought to mostly dry off after application. I believe that conventional wisdom may say that dry lubes are best if you're riding mainly in dry ...


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