New answers tagged

0

I have also had this problem several times. Both methods were needed for my road bike after I took a tumble. I have found that it could be caused by a few different things: Could be a very slightly bent derailleur hanger How to fix it: You can try to fix this by bending it back but be warned! Most derailleur hangers are aluminum and break/snap very easily! ...


0

The key to this problem is that you say the chain gets slack when you backpedal. This indicates with some certainty that your freewheel is the problem. To dispense with all doubt, remove the chain entirely from the gears on your rear wheel and spin the gears with your hands. It should spin easily and make a satisfying clicking noise. Any resistance there is ...


1

You can play around with chain-wrap and cable adjustment all you want but this problem is 99.999% of the time caused by wear on the cog's teeth. Ask your LBS if they can sell you only the cogs you need. It may seem like the cassette isn't old enough to justify being worn out, but that's a 10 tooth cog you're talking about, a tiny piece of thin metal ...


3

I have done this exact thing, and it continues today due to lack of parts availability. (Cannondale F700 from 2000, my daily commuter bike). My chain and sprockets are so worn, they will only work with each other. The distance between chain rollers has increased and the sprocket teeth have worn to little points. I tried a new chain but it just jumps off ...


0

A sticky cluster/cassette doesn’t explain my problem - my rear cluster (vintage bike) and jockey cage wheels turn freely with regular dismantling and cleaning. When I backpedal, the chain comes off my chainring at its bottom. A slack chain at the top is irrelevant, as it’s coming off the bottom of my chainring. Anyway, a sticky cluster/cassette should ...


3

The previous answers appear to have missed the fact that with 11s and higher drivetrains, the current consensus appears to be replacing the chain once it hits 0.5% wear. At .75%, riders will frequently need a new cassette. While this obviously seems expensive, many 11s and higher cassettes are even more expensive. On the road, our outer chainrings are also ...


1

Replacing a chain is much cheaper than replacing a whole drive train so it does not make sense to completely wear out your chain as if you do this you'll definitely need to replace the whole lot. As your drive train wears down (and as other answers say) your chain will likely slip in the most worn gears whilst under load, shifting performance will ...


5

All the functionality degradation symptoms of worn chains given in other answers here do not mention one more, possibly more phychological or ergonomic aspect of it. Namely the drivetrain noise. A heavily worn chain will be loud. No amount of lubricant will silence it for longer than a short period of time. Elongated chain links will rub along the teeth. The ...


16

In my experience - breakage is not directly correlated to wear. I've had bikes with unknown mileage on them, and have chosen to ride the transmission into the ground. Generally the performance slowly deteriorates, with chain slip under power being a sign that things are getting bad. Unlike other answerers, I've never had a worn transmission break and strand ...


5

Chains, cassettes, and chainrings are replaced to avoid sudden and catastrophic failure of the drivetrain. Sure, the chain might just slip a little, which might not be catastrophic, but catastrophic consequences are easily possible if something should suddenly and unexpectedly break. For starters, imagine what might happen if the rider were pedaling at full ...


9

Despite the "hell will freeze over" warnings (it doesn't) it is worth considering why you ride a bike, and why you ride an 11 or 12speed bike when a 9 speed will do the job just fine before going too deeply into the cost vs performance tradeoffs of when to change the chain. You are clearly aware the that shifting performance will deteriorate once a ...


3

Wearing down a chain means that it gets longer. And a longer chain does not fit on your sprockets anymore. With a chain-shift bike, the chain will tend to climb up the teeth of your sprocket, eventually skipping over the teeth, or falling off. Things are a bit different with single speed or IGH bikes: Single speed sprockets have longer teeth that make ...


4

Personal experience: Worn drive train, chain thrown, caught in, and cracked carbon frame...$600 repair. Lesson learned. Keep track of mileage, maintain and replace as appropriate. Chain breakage is not really the issue. Chain rings last quite a bit longer than cassette and chain, in my experience. So, downside is a drive train failure that leads to a ...


1

Z7 is one of if not the only 7-speed specific chains still made. It won't work right on 8-speed.


2

Sounds like there are two problems: chain coming off the rear sprockets and bad derailleur adjustment. These two things are very likely connected. A good reference for this type of repair is the Park Tool Repair Help article and videos on rear derailleur adjustment. The chain coming off may be caused by incorrect high or low limit settings, the chain jumping ...


3

Expanding on the comment by @DanielHicks, given the symptoms described, it sounds like you are talking about the shifting at the rear of the bike. Chances are that your rear derailer needs adjustment. Hopefully you don't force the chain on the correct cog by hand - that's what the derailer is for! In any case, when you push a shift lever, it pulls or ...


0

I can see losing a finger if care is not taken while cleaning a chain. Do not wipe bottom of chain while turning the pedals. The wheel inertia will pull your finger between the gear and chain. Ouch!! If the bike is on a training stand be sure little ones don't play with the spinning the crank either. I feel safer with a chain guard if front derailleur is ...


0

After some investigation with the wheelbuilder we determined the cause of the problem: a missing spacer in the axle assembly. With the spacer missing, the cassette lockring and axle end cap were essentially flush... ...which resulted in the lack of clearance for the chain. The fix is to remove the axle end caps, install the spacer (0.5mm) on the drive side, ...


4

Sometimes things like this happen when newer generation components are put on older frames. When Campy 10 first came out, I remember some frames doing it. However, that was usually from hitting the end of a chainstay or seatstay that wasn't offset flat enough with the inside face of the dropout. Your picture shows the chain rubbing against the flat surface ...


3

The choice of chain is first of all determined by the type of drivetrain. For instance, a 11-speed derailleur requires an 11-speed chain. A bike with a single ring and single cog, fore and aft, respectively, requires either a wide 1/8" or narrow single speed chain. If one is entirely overwhelmed by the choice of chains one cannot go wrong with taking a ...


-1

There are two types of chains available for bicycles: bushing-type chains and bushingless chains. Bushing-type chains consist of five parts: outer links, inner links, pins, bushings and rollers. The bushingless chain remove the bushing from the parts (thus leaving only 4 parts) and replace the bushing by two half-bushings stamped into the inner links. ...


0

Check the derailleur hanger alignment, and that the derailleur is mounted properly without the bolt being cross-threaded. You can check the derailleur alignment by eye. Pick up the back of the back of the bike and look down the line of the top run of the chain. (This can also be done with the bike upside down). The derailleur cage should look like it is ...


2

Chordal action. Look it up, i have the same problem.


1

Yes, the hub can be at fault. The freewheel mechanism pawls may be sticking in the retracted position, or the pawls and teeth are worn and the pawls are slipping out of the teeth. You can try to confirm this by having a friend ride behind and to the right of you and watch the cassette area (in an area free of obstructions where you can do this safely). They ...


3

To me, that looks pretty worn. My guess is that as the chain elongates, it grinds further into the gear valleys, making the "flattened" profile. The chain and cassette become mechanically paired, wearing together until the chain breaks. The cassette longs for its lost chain and will not take another mate... er, is mechanically incompatible with ...


1

I have no experience with 8-speed chains. However, seeing as your question has been up a while, I'll attempt to answer from general principles. Forgive me if you've already thought of the issues, but I don't know exactly what you know. Chain maintenance guides such as the one written by Cyclingtips and Park Tools suggest that 11s and higher chains be ...


1

By my reading, the other answers don't appear to discuss why paraffin wax should be better than standard drip lubricants. By way of background, Wikipedia defines waxes as organic compounds (i.e. anything with carbon-hydrogen bonds) that are malleable solids at ambient temperature. Paraffin is one type of wax that is typically derived from petroleum and that ...


Top 50 recent answers are included