New answers tagged

2

Sounds to me like your derailleur is not properly shifting (to the smaller cog) in those gears you mentioned. First thing to check (imo): Put the bike in a bike stand or position it upside down, shift onto smallest rear cog. Watch the cassette/chain whilst pedaling with one hand and shifting with the other hand. Check if the chain properly shifts each ...


0

Chains: Pros: Widely available Most flexibility for the gears easy to maintain Cons: Have to be lubed and maintained more Belt: Pros: Almost no maintaining Silent fancy Cons: Multiple gears only with a gear hub More expensive (especially with gear hub) Shaft drive: Pros: Almost no maintaining Silent Cons: Multiple gears only with a gear hub Not ...


14

When lubricating a chain, we need to get the slippery stuff "into" the chain. Specifically it needs to get between the rollers and the pins, marked in RED below. This is the area that takes all of the pressure from the chainring tooth, while rolling as the chain bends and straightens, as it does while entering and exiting the toothed rings (chainring and ...


25

No, lithium grease or similar grease compounds are in general not suitable for bike chains. Bike chains need lubrication of inner surfaces between rollers. Chain lubes contain solvents to reduce viscosity enough to creep into these gaps. The solvent dissipates and leaves a high viscosity oil. The surface does not need extra lubrication. It is best to ...


0

Chain length can be obtained using different methods. On my vintage bike I used the maximum cog length + 2 chain links. It can be a little tight so for start rather add 4 additional links. Because it is better to shorten the chain than lengthen. Those pins between normal links aren't made to be used multiple times! Source: https://si.shimano.com/pdfs/dm/...


1

Another heretofore unmentioned difference - suspension and tension. Derailleur gears and chains have a tensioner in the rear mech whereas Belt drive bikes have to have "the right tension" set in the belt. So if your bike frame has flex from a rear suspension setup, then it cannot have any variation in effective chainstay length else a belt drive will not ...


2

Your chain needs to be long enough to move freely when it is shifted to the largest cog and the largest ring at the same time.* To check the length, shift to these positions and move the chain by hand there. Then pull the chain together. You have to pull against the springs in the derailleur that requires a bit of force. As D. R. Hicks mentioned in the ...


0

You might also want to check if your front chainring or the crank spider (the crank arms) is/are bent. Check this by rotating the cranks and measuring the distance from a fixed point (eg the frame) to the teeth of the chainring. If this distance changes significantly (more than 1mm) whilst rotating the cranks this might be causing the issue. If so you might ...


-1

Check the chain ring (front sprocket) for damaged teeth .


0

Well I’ll add another cause of chain suck which just happened to me today - gummy eucalyptus tree wood which some how got sucked by the chain into the front chain ring and then was crushed and shoved into the chain so firmly it would not release when it should while pedaling. The wood was so firmly jammed it took me several serious yanks on the chain to free ...


1

My .02, and please don't take this the wrong way; you're drilling down into granular details that, in my 2 years of cleaning and waxing chains for 6 different bikes, is just inconsequential. I say inconsequential as related to nominal performance and durability of chain to drivetrain life for the majority of use by average or a sporting cyclists. Unless ...


2

Probably not, especially if some of that power is shared with heating, which may not be mentioned in a straightforward manner in the product description. According to Adam Kerin of Zero Friction Cycling, small jewellery cleaners won't cut it either, and there is also the possibility of getting a too strong cleaner that may damage the chain. Nominal ...


5

What's going to different is the length of the pin. The outside width dimension of higher speed chains get progressively narrower, so the corresponding connector pin would also have to be shorter. You definitely would not want to use an 11 speed pin on a 9 speed chain as it would not be long enough and the chain would be weakened. A 9 speed pin on an 11 ...


3

I think you can drive the detached 'leader' part of the pin out, then drive in a second connector link as normal. The part of the connector pin that stays in the chain has a slightly greater diameter than the regular pins so that it has an interference fit in the link plates. This is why you have to re-break a chain at a different link. The first pin would ...


2

I would use your existing 'snapped' connector pin and drive it in with the chain tool to force out the piece that is stuck (as you suggested in post). I would then drive out the connector pin with the chain tool (as if I were breaking the chain). And finally I would start over with a new connector pin. It's definitely worth carrying a few shimano pins and ...


8

You can often use the chain tool to drive the half-way inserted pin back out from the chain. I do not think it is advisable to attempt pressing it in again. It is certainly possible, I did re-pressed regular roller pins a couple of times when I or someone else accidentally pressed them out too far so that they fell off. It is not the most enjoyable ...


4

If this is your first go at waxing you might want to hold-off until summer so that you can get the hang of waxing before having to deal with the extra workload caused by poorer riding conditions. I use waxed chains in wet BC weather, not as sever as Alberta, but winter maintenance is still a challenge compared to summer. Like all lubes, waxing does not ...


8

I posed this question directly to the people at Molten Speed Wax and got this reply: Our product works great in winter, the key is to put the chain on the bike inside and run it through the gears when the chain is still warm from the pot. The reason is a newly waxed chain is very stiff in super cold temps., but if you pre-break in the chain before going ...


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