57

You're probably thinking of narrow-wide chainrings: Modern chains have inner and outer links. On a conventional chainring, all of the teeth are the same width, and therefore have to be narrow enough to fit into the chain's inner links. This means that there's enough space for the chain to move about a bit from side to side on the chainring, which can ...


26

In most cases with bicycle parts, more expensive means lighter. There can be exceptions, especially when you get to the super low end parts where cheaper can also mean cheaper construction. Since you put so many miles on your bike and it seems important to you, I would spend the extra 2 pounds and grab the Acera. XT is generally used on mountain bikes where ...


18

You may need to change your cassette with your chain due to damage, but only if your bike has missed out on some previous maintenance. If you ride one chain beyond the point of wear, it will damage both cassette and chain rings to different degrees. Your chain is a consumable component on your bike. For most people, 1200-1500 kilometers on a chain is a ...


18

You have a zero cost solution, which is to keep the front derailleur but remove the cable (and shifter if you like). Then use the FD limit screws to fix it in the right position to act as a chain guide. You don't need a 1x chainring, in fact using one with a 7 speed chain is probably less than ideal, so you're actually better off sticking with an existing ...


17

The idea used to be that a triple was just a double with an extra small, 'granny' ring (i.e. only grandmothers would need to use that one) so there was definitely some snobbery in a triple; that it was designed for those who needed a little more help. So on the club training run, you might be teased for it. (Google for 'triple granny ring' for various forum ...


15

1x9 setups are more common on a mountain bike or commuter bike setup with rapidfire shifters than a drop bar setup. However, due to a lack of front derailleur they can have chain jump issues due to the effect of the rear derailleur on the chainline. This has to be compensated for, often with a chain guard on the outer side and jump stop on the inner side of ...


15

UCI time trials are a class race contested in the tiny fractions of a percent, tiny differences in equipment become very important. Riders practice in wind tunnels to tweak everything from clothing to pedalling style, because a shift that gives an overall gain of 0.01% in speed can result in a win. Considering more than just the top gear, the jump from 50/...


14

As the others have stated, there's nothing wrong with any various drive train types (triple, double, 1x, single, etc). Compact drivetrains and triples are becoming more common because they provide an easier set of options for casual riding. A traditional double for a road bike may be more than most people want for casual riding. For example, if you take a ...


14

This is actually a matter of the force multiplication that each chainring provides, and the size/mass of each chainring. Force difference Let's propose, only for a moment that you had a chainring as big that the radius of it is almost the same as the crank length. If the rider stood to pedal while using that chainring (and using simple platform pedals). ...


14

You have a couple different options. I think the cheapest would be to switch to a compact crankset which would change the front chainrings from 52-39 to 50-34. I'm pretty sure you could do this while still using the same shifter. Changing the front shifter is required if you want to go from a double to a triple, as is changing the front derailleur. If you ...


14

Switching from 3x8 to 1x11 would be an expensive upgrade, well beyond your budget unless you get lucky hunting for used equipment, and may require a cascade of upgrades you hadn't planned on, which increase the cost further. You'd probably be better off saving up for a new bike--bike manufacturers are able to get parts at much lower cost, so when you buy a ...


14

Gear ratio range. If you decrease the chainring sizes you decrease the highest ratios available. It's not possible to make the gap between the chainrings much bigger and get decent front shifting so the large ring has to shrink with the small one. It's easier for manufacturers to make a wide ratio cassette that retains an 11 tooth sprocket and shifts ...


13

Shows some wear, but looks OK. All teeth look symmetrical and so do the spaces between them. Really worn teeth look like a swept back shark dorsal fin or develop a visible burr. Do a Google image search for 'worn chainring teeth' and you'll get plenty of examples.


12

Obviously, the simpler the better, and a triple is a little, er, "crankier" to maintain and use than a double. But on most bikes it will mean that you have both a slightly larger large gear and a significantly smaller small gear, in addition to having closer "jumps" between gears. Exactly how this all will work out depends on the manufacturer's choice of ...


11

Those notches are used when shifting gears, as you move the derailleur, the chain moves and catches on a notch and switches from one chainring to another adjusting the gearing. You do not need a replacement bicycle, this is a nice bike and with proper maintenance (keeping the drive train clean and lubed) should last a long time.


11

You mostly answered your own question: the racing market drives the industry, sometimes to the detriment of the availability of real-world gearing. A major compounding factor is that there are a lot of hoops a person has to jump through to get smaller rings on their road bike, starting with buying new, weird, mostly old or retro cranks. Making things work ...


10

You should always install a new chain (or have one that's pretty new already) when you install a new cassette. But you can go through 5 or so chains on a single cassette.


10

Interesting question. Real world conditions are messy with multiple factors impacting any analysis, as such my answer will be speculative, but based on a number of sensible working assumptions. Chainring degradation as a source First lets consider how much material comes off a chainring. Generally speaking, if you replace your chain regularly before it ...


10

The combination of rings and sprockets you can use depends on the specs of the derailleurs, specifically the total capacity of both the front and rear derailleurs and the max sprocket size of the rear derailleur. Front total capacity is just the max difference in size of the small and large chainrings, measured in teeth. Rear total capacity is the max (...


10

If the chainrings are in good order, I would recommend servicing the front derailleur and continue to run it as 3x. The reason is that front dérailleurs rust quickly but are often chrome plated and it’s actually easy to remove the rust. If the derailleur is temperamental it is typically solved by replacing the shifter inner cable ($1 on eBay) and ...


10

There is a limit to the amount of tension a given chain should be put under. Smaller chainrings increase that force - the pedal arm and chainring form a lever, and the smaller the chainring (and longer the pedal arm) the more force will be applied to the chain given a fixed force on the pedal. What you might be gaining in terms of chainring and cassette ...


9

This is a common setup for many freeride bikes, as it allows uphill pedaling and a bash guard. However only certain models of chain guide support this, and the one your son has doesn't officially (though it wouldn't hurt to try if you have a crankset to test; it might affect the derailleur ...). The DRS is eThirteen's 'official' dual chain guide.


9

The simple answer is yes, you can just change the crankset without replacing the entire drive train however there are other considerations. Depends on if your changing rings out or replacing the set and cranks. Other considerations if doing a full replacement are: Chain line When selecting a new crank set you need to ensure it aligns with the current ...


9

Yes, this should be possible. Though there are several things you need to check to ensure it is compatible: Number of bolts, and bolt circle diameter (BCD). Count the number of bolts, and measure the distance between the centre of two bolts. Then check Sheldon Brown's Bolt Circle Diameter Crib Sheet to see what the BCD is. Common sizes are 110 (mountain ...


9

Here are some points taken from the literature: Mechanical efficiency is usually 88-98% for majority of deraileur systems (when clean,lubricated and new) Drivetrain efficiency decreases with smaller rear cogs, Highest efficiency can be reached at high torques and low cadence, Chainline effects are negligible, imposible to note with measurement apparatus, ...


9

You should not have to replace the entire crank-set. In general, a 'mid-compact' 52/36 crank will have a 110mm BCD spider, which allows 50 and 34 tooth rings to be installed. The Ultegra FC-R8000 crank on the Canyon comes in 53-39, 52-36 and 50-34 versions, so you will be able to get the smaller rings for that specific crank. The front derailleur may need ...


9

4mm at the closest point is about the safe spot. 3mm is about the sane bare minimum you can go to if you want to push things. Less is asking for trouble. Note that frames, cranks, rings, and spindles do vary in how flexy they are and riders vary in habits and strength, so one can only approximate here. If you stacked the movement from a bunch of flexy things ...


9

The main limiting factor is chainstay clearance. If your chainrings touch the chainstay it will wear and weaken and eventually fail. So the first thing is google your bike frame and see what maximum size chainring its rated for. Do this first. Once you have that info, get onto Sheldon's gear calculator https://www.sheldonbrown.com/gear-calc.html and ...


9

Disclaimer: I am not a fan of upgrading bike components. I believe for most people, it's a waste of money, usually trying to make a silk purse from a sows ear. Some succeed, but few do better than using the money to upgrade the entire bike. (Replacing worn out components with better ones can be worth while if done carefully.) With just two years riding and ...


8

The Schlumpf drives have been around for several years and incorporate a two-speed planetary gear drive attached to the bottom bracket. With the heel of your shoe, you tap a small button centered on the end of the bottom bracket to engage and disengage the planetary gear. Three models are available: a "mountain gear" version that lowers whatever other gears ...


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