19

In my experience - breakage is not directly correlated to wear. I've had bikes with unknown mileage on them, and have chosen to ride the transmission into the ground. Generally the performance slowly deteriorates, with chain slip under power being a sign that things are getting bad. Unlike other answerers, I've never had a worn transmission break and strand ...


15

Chainrings designed for multispeed systems have special pins and ramps in them, to assist shifting. Key word being assist. If you have rings for a certain config, it might not have those features in the right spots. If you don't have them, shifting won't be as good as it would be otherwise. That doesn't necessarily mean it'll be complete garbage either, ...


14

Despite the "hell will freeze over" warnings (it doesn't) it is worth considering why you ride a bike, and why you ride an 11- or 12-speed bike when a 9 speed will do the job just fine before going too deeply into the cost vs performance tradeoffs of when to change the chain. You are clearly aware the that shifting performance will deteriorate once ...


13

The specific model of rear derailleur you have is an Acera RD-M360 SGS, produced about 2009-2011, for 7 or 8 speed drivetrains. Shimano very helpfully provides archive specifications on the product info page. Looking in the 2009 spec PDF we can see that the max size of the largest sprocket the derailleur will handle is 34. I believe 12-34 freewheels do exist,...


13

Yes - after that mileage you will need both a new chain and new cassette. A new chain on the old cassette will not mesh right, and accelerate wear on the new chain. Depending how much chain elongation has accrued, you may need new chainrings too. They wear slower because more teeth are engaged in the chain. Look at the chainring and see if the scallops are ...


13

Additionally, a 1x chainring is likely to be "narrow-wide" to help with chain retention. If you look closely, every tooth is alternately wider and narrower, so you place the chain on such that outside plates are around a wide tooth. If you had used a FD to change chainrings, there's a 50% chance the chain will land wrong, and your wide tooth gets ...


12

From looking up the specs I presume your crank is FC-M8000-2. If you're saying that the crank arms are moving while the big ring and chain remain stationary in space, and the rear cog didn't move, the only possible explanations are that either the interface between the spider and the right crank has failed, or the metal toothy part of the composite XT big ...


9

While not suggesting its the best option, another option from a new cassette is a 30 tooth chainring. which will give close to same ratios as a 14-34 cassette. Square taper cranks can often be picked up free or very cheap at recycle centers or local bike coops. A 30th chainring will cost about the same as a new cassette, and you can shorten the chain (...


8

All the functionality degradation symptoms of worn chains given in other answers here do not mention one more, possibly more psychological or ergonomic aspect of it. Namely the drivetrain noise. A heavily worn chain will be loud. No amount of lubricant will silence it for longer than a short period of time. Elongated chain links will rub along the teeth. The ...


8

The other posters are probably right. But, if you haven't money to burn, I would replace the chain first and see how it goes. You say you keep it clean and well lubed so damage to the front chainrings are less likely and unless you seldom change gear, the cassette may be good enough to last another chain. Have a look at the teeth to see if they look like ...


8

Generally speaking, a frame/wheel hub that is fitted with a 8/9/10 speed cassette can take any of 8/9/10 speed because they're all the same width, just pack an extra cog or two in by thinning down the chain and inter-cog spacing. 11 may be possible but it depends on how the cassette can overhang inboard of the freehub without grinding. 12/13/14 speed is ...


8

I'm a big fan of low gears (I run a 22 inner ring on my MTB despite being a fairly strong climber), but I'd say a 22 or 24t ring is too small to use as an only ring - it'll spin out much to easily on slight downhills or with tailwinds. You can get 1x cranks for MTB that come as standard with a 30T ring, and aftermarket 28T rings - I'd suggest these would be ...


8

As MaplePanda correctly points out, these bolts are not meant to be disassembled by the end-user. From Shimano's technical documents website, here are the pertinent documents related to your SM-CRM75 direct mount chainring. None of the documents refer this area of the chainring. This is a fairly gross oversight on Shimano's part, especially when ...


7

Shimano makes the TZ510 7-speed freewheel which is 14-34 teeth. It generally retails for under $20. You'll need to get a "freewheel removal tool" which is a splined tool on one side while the other side has a 1 inch hex nut. From Park Tool, the model FR 1.3, are less than $10 and a well equipped bike shop generally has these in stock. Be aware ...


7

More additional information for 1x setup: Besides bolt layout matches and tooth-count, on 1x there is an additional parameter: offset. The chain-ring offset from the crank helps the chain get a good line towards the cassette on the rear hub. The chainline will differ on a bike frame with boost rear spacing and non-boost spacing, so there are different ...


7

I would suggest you go with an IGH (internal geared hub), a 29T front chainring and a 24T on the back. It works, the only caution needed is that shifting while pedaling hard should be avoided, otherwise the internal of the IGH will wear out quickly ... I don't think this will be an issue for your low-power mother.


7

The SunRace crankset is cheap. They are still available and probably have an identical specification. The cheapest types have non removable chainrings. The steel used to make them is not particularly hard wearing and they will wear fast with a worn chain. My experience is that you can get slipping from the chainring, though these usually wear more slowly ...


7

Great video - shows that your chain is riding up on the teeth of the single chainring, and then dropping back down into the teeth or off to the inside. I doubt its the chainring teeth, they look fine other than having paint scraped off. First, get a marker pen and do the same setup as video. Slowly turn the crank and as soon as it steps up onto the peaks, ...


7

The rings are not replaceable. You can remove them with a drill if required. This type of chainset is very cheap and quite heavy. It would cost significantly more to replace the rings than to replace the whole chainset! The rings don't look so worn, perhaps you want to change ratios. If you do buy a new chainset, if it is from a different manufacturer you ...


6

You can play around with chain-wrap and cable adjustment all you want but this problem is 99.999% of the time caused by wear on the cog's teeth. Ask your LBS if they can sell you only the cogs you need. It may seem like the cassette isn't old enough to justify being worn out, but that's a 10 tooth cog you're talking about, a tiny piece of thin metal ...


6

Maybe not relevant or too late for you but this may help someone else.... I had the same issue with chain slipping on smallest two cogs of the Eagle cassette when applying pressure . Tried mostly everything everyone has suggested on this forum to tune the gears.... And then I realised all it was is that I installed the sram powerlink on the chain the wrong ...


6

Chains, cassettes, and chainrings are replaced to avoid sudden and catastrophic failure of the drivetrain. Sure, the chain might just slip a little, which might not be catastrophic, but catastrophic consequences are easily possible if something should suddenly and unexpectedly break. For starters, imagine what might happen if the rider were pedaling at full ...


6

I will focus on the chain tension part of the answer, as your big chainring is clearly worn out. However, do note that increasing the derailleur spring tension wouldn’t stop the chain skipping on the worn chainring. Therefore, this answer is mainly for the sake of interest. By chain tension, I believe you actually mean the tension in the rear derailleur ...


6

I suspect the symptom of slipping could be mitigated for a while by increasing chain tension, but it would only be a short-term fix. Here's a trace of one of your photos highlighting the teeth. See how the grannie ring has nice fat teeth, with a pronounced width and a curve over the top of each tooth? This ring has seen little use and is perfectly ...


6

There's more to front derailleur adjustment than limit screws and cable tension. Both the angle of the derailleur and the height need to be set properly. The angle of the derailleur being off can cause chain rub against the cage. If the rear of the cage is angled too far outward, the chain can rub against the inside of the cage when the chain is on the ...


6

The crankset (110 BCD - Bolt Circle Diameter) is unlikely to accept a 30T chainring. It definitely isn't supported by Shimano. You need a new crank. Look at subcompact cranksets like, e.g., FSA Tempo Adventure (10/11 speed). Note that this specific one also uses a different bottom bracket.


5

I have done this exact thing, and it continues today due to lack of parts availability. (Cannondale F700 from 2000, my daily commuter bike). My chain and sprockets are so worn, they will only work with each other. The distance between chain rollers has increased and the sprocket teeth have worn to little points. I tried a new chain but it just jumps off ...


5

Chain tension is set by the springs in the derailleur. Some derailleur models have a tension adjustment in the upper B-pivot, but I think this is to adjust the range B-screw rather than change the overall force the derailleur puts on the chain.


5

The time to replace a chain is when it needs replacing, not at some predetermined interval. Take it to the bike shop and have them use their chain stretch tool. From the symptoms you describe, you probably need a new one. I have never replaced a chain at 2,000 miles, and in younger days, I was I was doing 10,000 miles a year on pretty expensive equipment ...


5

Are you trying to bring the derailleur farther outwards? If so, you need to add cable tension. Screwing out the H limit screw won’t help if there isn’t enough tension to get to the limit anyways. To check for chainring problems, derail the chain from the chainrings entirely and give the cranks a spin. If you see the chainrings wiggle side to side, then you ...


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