New answers tagged

1

I have a list of cranks here. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1HdcNgmQKFA-lAqQJ3lXQ8SwA4tblAKiOXe9XYJJHYN8/edit There are a few alternates of similar quality and vintage, such as Hone, XT, XTR, LX, SLX, and Saint. Alternatively a cheap modern 9-speed HT2 crankset could be very cheap. E.g, FC-MT300-3. You could remove the chainrings from that and fit ...


4

It's a very populous crank and generally speaking any aftermarket/replacement type chainrings will go on it. It tends to be true that the designated Shimano chainrings make the best replacements for their cranks in terms of performance, or at least avoid minor weirdness with spacing or spider fit, but it's rare for those issues to be insurmountable when ...


1

Replacing a chain is much cheaper than replacing a whole drive train so it does not make sense to completely wear out your chain as if you do this you'll definitely need to replace the whole lot. As your drive train wears down (and as other answers say) your chain will likely slip in the most worn gears whilst under load, shifting performance will ...


3

All the functionality degradation symptoms of worn chains given in other answers here do not mention one more, possibly more phychological or ergonomic aspect of it. Namely the drivetrain noise. A heavily worn chain will be loud. No amount of lubricant will silence it for longer than a short period of time. Elongated chain links will rub along the teeth. The ...


13

In my experience - breakage is not directly correlated to wear. I've had bikes with unknown mileage on them, and have chosen to ride the transmission into the ground. Generally the performance slowly deteriorates, with chain slip under power being a sign that things are getting bad. Unlike other answerers, I've never had a worn transmission break and strand ...


5

Chains, cassettes, and chainrings are replaced to avoid sudden and catastrophic failure of the drivetrain. Sure, the chain might just slip a little, which might not be catastrophic, but catastrophic consequences are easily possible if something should suddenly and unexpectedly break. For starters, imagine what might happen if the rider were pedaling at full ...


7

Despite the "hell will freeze over" warnings (it doesn't) it is worth considering why you ride a bike, and why you ride an 11 or 12speed bike when a 9 speed will do the job just fine before going too deeply into the cost vs performance tradeoffs of when to change the chain. You are clearly aware the that shifting performance will deteriorate once a ...


3

Wearing down a chain means that it gets longer. And a longer chain does not fit on your sprockets anymore. With a chain-shift bike, the chain will tend to climb up the teeth of your sprocket, eventually skipping over the teeth, or falling off. Things are a bit different with single speed or IGH bikes: Single speed sprockets have longer teeth that make ...


3

Personal experience: Worn drive train, chain thrown, caught in, and cracked carbon frame...$600 repair. Lesson learned. Keep track of mileage, maintain and replace as appropriate. Chain breakage is not really the issue. Chain rings last quite a bit longer than cassette and chain, in my experience. So, downside is a drive train failure that leads to a ...


9

While not suggesting its the best option, another option from a new cassette is a 30 tooth chainring. which will give close to same ratios as a 14-34 cassette. Square taper cranks can often be picked up free or very cheap at recycle centers or local bike coops. A 30th chainring will cost about the same as a new cassette, and you can shorten the chain (...


7

Shimano makes the TZ510 7-speed freewheel which is 14-34 teeth. It generally retails for under $20. You'll need to get a "freewheel removal tool" which is a splined tool on one side while the other side has a 1 inch hex nut. From Park Tool, the model FR 1.3, are less than $10 and a well equipped bike shop generally has these in stock. Be aware ...


13

The specific model of rear derailleur you have is an Acera RD-M360 SGS, produced about 2009-2011, for 7 or 8 speed drivetrains. Shimano very helpfully provides archive specifications on the product info page. Looking in the 2009 spec PDF we can see that the max size of the largest sprocket the derailleur will handle is 34. I believe 12-34 freewheels do exist,...


2

I replaced the BB on this crankset recently. I have a spreadsheet here with all Shimano 9/10/11 speed cranksets & BBs https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1HdcNgmQKFA-lAqQJ3lXQ8SwA4tblAKiOXe9XYJJHYN8/edit The M523 is the only crankset with these chainrings and bottom bracket. However, the M522 is almost identical with 42/32/24 chainrings & no need ...


3

If you're just riding casually, then a simple chainring replacement is probably all you need. You don't have to match the styling, just the Bolthole Circle Diameter (BCD) and number of boltholes. It looks like a 4 bolt pattern, but there are a number of standard sizes (naturally) Personally I use a 100% printout of the PDF at https://cdn.shopify.com/s/...


2

I would recommend you to replace not only the chainrings and crankset, but also the bottom bracket. Octalink is getting rare because it is a big honking design flaw. There are not one but two flaws in it. The first flaw is that it lacks press fit, so the left crank is free to rotate in its splines minutely forwards and backwards. If you rest your weight by ...


3

What I did in the end was this: The new chainring was a black Dimension with a pretty generously thick tab section. I actually went with an unramped one, but running it flipped wouldn't work because of its offset. Running it without a counterbore for the nut caused the chain to get stuck on the nuts when in the inner ring. I used a countersink drill bit in ...


4

Yes, all Shimano 11-speed road cable pull is the same. The long armed 11-speed FDs like FD-5800, 6800 etc can all be and frequently are replaced with the toggle models, i.e. FD-R8000.


1

The 10 speed chain is slightly narrower than a 9-speed chain. The tooth spacing of 9 speed chainrings in the side direction is slightly different than for 10 speed chainrings. In the front-back direction, the tooth spacing of all chainrings is the same regardless of the speed count. The worst that could happen (assuming here you have at least two chainrings) ...


-1

I just got my mountain bike back from the shop after a frame warranty, and they replaced my chain as it was apparently worn (2x11). They recommended changing the cassette and chainrings while I was at it, but I wanted to inspect those myself before making those relatively expensive changes. Choose a different shop the next time. There is absolutely no ...


11

In the ideal case, the chain will not actually be rubbing significantly against the chainrings under load. As the chain wears, the spacing between the chain links becomes different from the tooth spacing, and this difference in spacing means that there is sliding contact as the teeth engage the chain. The rollers inside the chain help to convert some of this ...


-1

The Malus is a freewheel NOT a cassette. shimono does make a 34mm with I believe 14 teeth which Ive head good things about just in research but as far as additional parts Im not sure they are required as they work with the original twist gear.


8

Cross-chaining is a mythical beast. Yes, it's best to avoid riding significant distances with the chain at a wide angle, but you pretty much can't shift a bike without doing it occasionally, and there are advantages to being able to quickly access the full range of rear cluster gear ratios, without having to constantly fiddle with the front. Plus, it may ...


2

In general you want to avoid extreme chain angles. This gear calculator has a typical 3x7 setup with 50/40/30 crank and 14-28 7 speed Shimano freewheel https://gear-calculator.com/?GR=DERS&KB=30,40,50&RZ=24,22,20,18,16,28,14&UF=2215&TF=90&SL=1.5&UN=KMH&DV=teeth The max chain angle is set to the smallest possible . It shows that 50/...


9

Is it not literally suggesting cross-chaining? Cross-chaining is putting a chain at extreme angle between front and rear cogs. The picture above illustrates correct ways to use the front triple. Incorrect ways would be: the biggest front ring with the biggest rear one, and the smallest front one with the smallest rear one. I'm also thinking about removing ...


1

I run a small bicycle hobby shop. I have been doing 21 to 7, and 24 to 8 conversions for as long as I can remember. The conversion can even be done with a riveted crankset that has no bolts in it. I carefully drill out the rivets or spot weld that hold the 3 chainrings together, throw away the big and small ring, and keep the middle ring. Typically in ...


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