13

A 100 watt solar panel is nominal watts under ideal situations. You'll be lucky to get 25 watts tied to the back of your bike - and this would be only for a few hours of the day, from 11a to 3p. Given that your bike is likely using at least 100-200 watts even on low pedal assist, you're only going to gain 5-10% more range over the entire day. From experience,...


9

You can charge it, but you probably won't do as well as you think. You're on the right track but you're missing a couple of things: Solar panel ratings: These are optimistic and assume full sun hitting the panel at a good angle. Here's the maths. You won't get that all day, so don't expect to get as much as you would by multiplying the number of hours ...


8

Answer No, you need an item designed for this purpose. Whether yours do or not, it totally depends on the product. Many modern lights are charged by USB, but they can't supply USB to other devices. There are other products which combine a USB battery with a light, but the batteries inside these are much larger than a plain light. Notice 80%+ of this ...


5

An additional downside is electrical conversion losses. The solar panel will likely be putting out around 12V at some current, perhaps 5W for a 500 gram panel to 20W for a 2.5 kilogram panel. That's roughly 0.5A and 2A at 12V. Inverting that to 220V AC and then rectifying it back to DC 36V to charge the ebike battery will lose a significant percentage of ...


4

Those are 48V batteries, which you want to charge with a 12V (nominal) solar panel. That's not going to work directly. So we look for an indirect solution. At the very least some form of boost convertor would be required. I won't go into details as we're now on bicycles.se not electronics. But designing a charger for lithium batteries isn't for the ...


3

Even though the design may be CE compliant, the unfortunate reality is that cheap manufacturers will still leave out "unnecessary" circuit components or replace them with fake ones when actually building it. (RoHS just means it's free of lead and mercury etc etc, nothing to do with quality or usability of the electrical design.) The components that are ...


3

All great responses above, particularly regarding the true efficiency of charging the batteries via solar. In an ideal world, this would be so effin cool, to theoretically ride across the country without ever plugging in. I have a 1400w Li-ion solar generator from goal zero and fabricated a trailer to tow behind my Radwagon. I intend on getting an extra Rad ...


3

Most lights are not designed for this, and it will not work. Anyhow, even if you had a light that this could work for, its not a great idea to get into the habit of. Why? Phones take a decent amount of energy to charge. With a battery the size of a bike light, you can easily end up draining the battery by trying to charge your phone (especially as the ...


2

To charge a phone you need exactly 5V, at least 0.5A but ideally 1A or more. Forget about USB lights. Their internal batteries are 3.7V which is hard to convert; they're also inaccessible. But many of the high-brightness rechargeable lights use detachable battery packs at 7.4V. This can be converted to 5V with some electronics: either a linear regulator ...


2

"The second problem is that im not sure if a new battery will work wihout pairing/programming. ... and will a new battery work (plug'n'play)?" Yes, no problem, I've used three different batteries on my bike so far and no problem switiching between them, nor when the other batteries went back to their original bikes.


2

It looks like you might have bypassed the charge controller on the pack and charged the cells directly? The smarter pack controllers do a form of coulomb counting and will see anomalous or unexpected pack voltages as a risk and premptively brick. But before you get to that conclusion, I’d measure the individual cell voltages and make sure they are all ...


2

E-Bike was just 1 and a half year old The e-bike battery from bosch has 2 years warranty. The e-bike itself has just 1 year warranty. Battery was sent from a local store to bosch and I received a new one!


2

You should tell your friend ASAP that the bike is not charging. Ask if there is a trick to making it work. Your worst case is the battery has died, and you need to offer to contribute toward a new one. When borrowing something, you are responsible for it, and and for any damage. Your friend might have known the battery was on its last-legs, if they didn't ...


1

Micro-USB connectors break rather easily if you attempt to pair them "upside down". Memorize the needed orientation of the charging cable. A partially broken socket may work with some connectors only, and not with others. These connectors are difficult to solder by hand, while some say they can do. If you short circuit the low end lithium battery ...


1

This really needs more investigation on your part to come up with the answer. Start eliminating possibilities and see if the symptom stays or moves away. Iterate on this and figure out the root cause. Do you ride in the rain a lot ? Water may be damaging the port, preventing charging. Try charging one of those older lights again. They may have had time ...


1

When you discharge a lithium-ion battery all the way you can run into serious problems. If the battery is relatively new it may be under warranty and an exchange would be your best bet. The battery contains electronic circuitry designed to prevent a total discharge. If that circuitry fails the battery is ruined. If the internal voltage of the battery falls ...


1

Are you sure all connections are clean between the battery and charger? I try to keep things clean and have been advised by my dealer ( Cooksons in Prestwitch). Recently neither of us could see a problem so the battery was returned to Madison. They found particles within the charger battery interface. Magnificent service from both!


1

I looked at the Shimano protocol and they put a challenge response between the bike and the battery in order to prevent replacing the cell. Looking at your picture, I see a white PCB in order to do not can follow the track of the component on the PCB. By the way there is some glue on the components and connectors, that means they really don't want you to ...


1

My e-bike battery of 500 watt-hours lasts at 24 km/h around 120 kilometers. Thus, it lasts for 5 hours. This requires charging of 100 watts if I used solar panels to charge the batteries. I estimate that about half of the power is produced by the battery and the rest of the power (the second half) by me, the rider. So it's 200 watts total. Solar constant is ...


1

Yes, some models have the second USB A type port to provide power, using the charged lamp as battery pack. You can charge your phone or the red rear light, for instance. Google 'bike light USB power bank' to find them. The photo shows Dosun light with 2500mAh capacity accumulator, enough to charge a typical phone battery from empty to almost full. You ...


1

Yes - I have done this using a SP PD-8 and a Sinewave Reactor . However, it's easier if you use the Reactor to charge a cache battery, and then charge the Garmin from that. This is because the Garmin will try to switch off whenever you stop if it's running directly off the USB out of the Reactor.


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