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5

Update: It's been over a year since I posted the question and I rode ~1000km on that bike. I had no problems with the hub. The cone looks better now, and performs well. I believe there were just some stains on the surface. Here's a picture of it now, cleaned and degreased. I left the dust cap on now, because last time I took it off it was a pain to put it ...


3

Bog-standard BMX, probably Chinese, likely from a department store. The brake is a touch fancy but nothing else is remarkable.


3

I think your two options are (if you want to do this properly) Paint will not properly adhere to the chrome, so, sand or grind of the chrome, rust etc, fill pits and irregularities, sand to proper condition for painting, properly prime, paint and clearcoat. Removing chrome probably requires use of special filtration masks. The same, except have the fork re-...


3

I would try to remove it with very fine wet and dry (800-1200). (put cone in drill, sand off as it spins) However I expect it is just a poor flashing of zinc or cadmium (both soft, shouldn't be cadmium nowadays), that would normally wear straight off the bearing surfaces as soon as ridden. Aside from high-end cones, they don't actually come highly ...


3

I'm just a guy who's serviced a few dozen cup and cone hubs in his day. I can't imagine that's going to last. Every cone I've ever had was highly polished, hardened steel. I've never seen plating. I've thrown out cones that were pitted less severely than the flaking on this looks, because they were pretty gravelly in use.


3

In the end I had success using a grinding wheel and a 100mm / 4" grinder to remove all the slightly loose chrome. The good chrome under the grips simply wouldn't move, so ended up being ground off by the grinder wheel. This left a terrible surface, with many small flattened patches and diagonal scoring. It was no longer round. I spent a half-hour with ...


2

The second comment above is correct. This is something that needs to be done in a shop that plates chrome. This is often done for old car parts. I've never done it, so I don't know what it costs. It wouldn't make sense unless the part you are replacing is an original bar on a classic (or dear to you) bike. Otherwise you should just get a new bar that's as ...


1

Rear wheel is also way too far forward, possibly the chain is elongated or even just too long given the mount of droop. Can't really see, but the front rim looks more worn than the rear, suggesting there may have been a front brake which was removed possibly ? Top part of headset looks wrong - perhaps plastic. There's also rust in most of the welds, it needs ...


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