Hot answers tagged

5

A point made in a previous comment suggests full face helmets affect peripheral vision. This is a safety downside. A bigger safety downside is this: They must also affect hearing (well-ventilated helmets that don't block too much sound will be prone to wind noise). Hearing is a valuable tool for telling what's coming up behind.


4

I often wear a regular cycling helmet as it may slightly reduce the severity of traumatic brain injury in certain crashes. The probability of such a crash is very low. The probability of a crash where the helmet is sufficient to mitigate brain injury in a significant way is even slimmer. However, since the reward for the rare cases where it helps is high (so ...


3

I got a RAM mount and put my new iPhoneXR into it on my Honda VTX1300 (sorry not a pedal bike). Did about 600 miles through Colorado and Wyoming... and my optical stabilization was done. The phone has always been in a case since the day I bought it and was never dropped. But after the ride the front facing camera would focus in and out like 100x second.... ...


2

Ultimately it comes down to balance, what you have to work out is whether you can balance easier while moving slowly or not. Watch a few track stand videos to see whether you think it's possible, if your sense of balance is good it's possible on any bike. All that's required is generally a few inches of movement while braking and leaning into the direction ...


2

Because full face helmets are way heavier, less aerodynamic and much less ventilated. Wearing it on a road bike most probably wouldn't take you very far. The same applies for XC or any discipline where you're making long and steady efforts for one hour or more. A DH race consists of interval-type efforts, and there is rest in between; a DH racer will not be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible