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57

I've had to commute routes where I need to use a narrow staircase to go up and down a pedestrian bridge over a highway. For starters, any place where you have to share narrow space with pedestrian, the polite way to do so is to dismount. I shoulder the bike or walk it. The bike always goes to the far side ( If there is a fence or wall, the bike goes towards ...


49

Frankly if you're going up/down steps, you're in the pedestrian's space and not somewhere suitable for cycling. You know how sometimes vehicle traffic intrudes on our cycle lanes? Parking inconsiderately, putting cyclists at risk? That's what you'd be doing to the pedestrians by riding in their space. Don't be that-guy. Your solutions are to either walk ...


25

because I have no problem stopping Objectively, this is nonsense. At best, you can stop before you start going down the steps. Once you start going down steps on a bike though, you are completely unable to stop before you reach the bottom, and you have very limited control over your speed whilst you're doing it. And that's assuming you stay on your ...


7

Generally, wide tires have lower rolling resistance than narrow ones, and they will be more comfortable due to cushioning. Hence, there's an argument you could go all the way up to a 45mm tire, the maximum I think your bike will clear. For performance-oriented road riders, aerodynamic considerations might come into play, but these are probably irrelevant ...


6

Yes, you can prevent this situation. Don't go down the stairs on your bicycle (and most likely not even carrying it, if it is so narrow). It's not possible that there are only two ways to get to your destination, unless you live on the very top of a hill. You are presenting us two options: boring way (path A); short, fun, most likely with an illegal stretch ...


6

Being myself somebody who rides down various stairsets pretty much daily, I obviously disagree with the answers stating that this should categorically not be done. However I do agree that it's a no-no to ride down a narrow stairset when there's someone below you, or might appear below you. I.e., I only start descending if I can oversee the landing, and know ...


6

Its highly advisable that you do not ride your bike down a narrow staircase where pedestrians are present. People will get very mad with you, and it very likely could be against the law/city ordinance. Additionally, you could be destroying or damaging the stairs by doing this. Either walk your bike down, or find an alternative route. Hope this helps you make ...


5

I see three answers saying "Just don't do that" with variations. They may be right. Nevertheless, I would like to suggest another answer. Slow down! Seeing a bike coming towards you at full speed is indeed scary. You should try to avoid scaring people. If you slow down to walking speed, the scare goes away. By going slow, you both indicate that ...


4

Whenever you are not aiming for riding in a race, go for serious puncture proof tires. Especially if you are a casual rider who can't just fix a flat within 10min on the road side. I certainly can't, even though I've patched enough tires for a lifetime. You are not going to get significant enjoyment out of being able to ride 0.1km/h faster, but you are going ...


2

Learn to see the Future aka Situational Awareness As a road user, you have to share the roadway with other road users. That's the collective group of drivers, cyclists, pedestrians, etc. One of the greatest advantages you have is to be able to predict what's about to happen and to "pre-react" or place yourself in such a way as to take advantage, ...


1

There are a few pro's and con's to mountain bikes in the city. Pro You don't really care about potholes, uneven pavements, bad cycle lanes, tree roots etc. so much. The wide tires & suspension take care of those. You don't loose as much speed due to bad road conditions. Since your average tree root does not accelerate the entire bike including rider ...


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