68

I am an industrial chemist, and manufacture commercial-grade degreasers and other cleaners. Firstly, there are 3 main parts to a degreaser: Alkaline booster, to increase the pH, allowing the dirt, grease and grime to be effectively removed, for faster cleaning Solvent, to cut through tough grime and grease, as well as extract grime and grease from hard-to-...


51

Do nothing. Yes, nothing. Unless you are biking wearing a hazmat suit through some corrosive volcanic crater where it rains acid. Rinse it off, at home when it's convenient, or it is especially dirty. Give a more thorough cleaning once a year in the spring. Lube the chain occasionally when it begins to make some noise. Other than that, you really don't ...


15

There is a similar question (but not the same question) here and here. The short version is that regular upkeep -- chain replacement, cassette replacement, lubrication, brakes (modulo say rebleeding a hydraulic set), tires & tubes you should do at home as needed (and I've given some guidelines for the first two), and you should be familiar with basic ...


14

A lot of people are now out of the habit of doing chain cleaning beyond wipe down level. The reason to clean thoroughly is a marginal improvement in wear life and performance. But the key word is marginal. What you get for the effort is below the threshold of what many would consider worthwhile, especially riding recreationally. Note that the expense level ...


14

3 weeks isn't likely enough for you to damage the chain noticeably (rattling sounds and all that jazz) unless you're putting particularly heavy mileage. This isn't something I'd recommend doing; diesel fuel doesn't have the right lubricating properties for a bicycle chain. It's also not the most pleasant stuff to be around. Diesel will act as a degreaser ...


13

Usually I use the tool like this, put your degreaser inside it and of course the chain inside, rotate your crank and it will clean all part of your chain, inside out. for cog cleaning,


12

I know it sounds too simple, but these bags are made to be cleaned (assuming yours is unlined. If it's lined, you'll never get it out). First, try dish soap and water. Citrus scents seem to cut the smell best, but that may be a personal preference. If that is not enough, then the next best option is to use a diluted solution of something like Pine Sol or ...


12

Rain, hail, and snow don't hurt a chain. Salt makes it rust, and dirt wears it out. Salt: You won't get all the salt out without removing the chain from the bike. The chain is doomed. You can, however, easily delay this till spring with regular application of wet chain lube. A bit of rust won't hurt if you ride regularly. Dirt: Given that the chain only ...


11

I've heard you should keep high pressure water away from your bike, because it can easily work it's way into the bearings, even sealed ones, especially around the bottom bracket and wheels. Pressurized water will push the oil out of the spaces between the chain links, and it's probably not a good idea to use pressurized water at all. You should be able to ...


11

A thorough way to do it would be to: Remove the cranks, bottom bracket and seat post. Make sure there is a decent hole between the seat tube and bottom bracket shell (might depend on the frame). Ram rags down the seat tube with a broom handle and extract them via the bottom bracket shell. Once the bulk of the grease is removed (or pushed to the bottom of ...


11

This is an XY problem. Seatposts should be lubed. While removing all lube may solve your slipping problem, it will likely do so by making the seatpost corrode into place, which isn't something you want. Instead, fix or replace your seatpost clamp, and/or make sure your seatpost isn't undersized.


10

In the kitchen section of their web site GreasedLightning says to avoid painted or aluminum surfaces. In my case that is 90% of my bike


10

Ultimately its going to be down to how zealous you want to be. When you think of cleaning a chain, you need to think of two things. First, there is the cleaning - getting off the dirt and lube that has caked itself onto the chain. Then, there is lubing the chain to make it run nicely, (As part of a lube you'd maybe give the chain a rub with a dry cloth to ...


10

Let it air dry (and/or wipe it dry as much as you can) and move on with your life. Don't put it near a heater, cause that isn't good for the rubber stuff. Re-lube the chain. What gets you in winter is not so much the snow/ice, but the salt (which doesn't affect your bike if its just standing there). In this case, if you have the time and space to bring the ...


9

Rather than any complicated method or products, I do the following: Take it with me when I shower. Lather up hair with my preferred shampoo. Loosen straps and fittings, place helmet on head and move and squish it around a bit to distribute the shampoo. Rinse Repeat. Shampoo or body wash works great. Then I just clip the straps over a line to hang the ...


9

That particular Shimano freehub can be disassembled, but it is quite a job to get it back together afterward. There are around 80 2mm bearings in two different locations in the freehub, and a skilled and practiced mechanic has roughly a 60% chance of opening without losing parts, and successfully getting it back together. The good news is, there is a tool ...


9

If what you're looking for is a cheap alternative, here in my country is very common to use diesel or kerosene to clean bike parts. Personally I use diesel, I just pour a small amount in an old plastic cup, and use a brush (the kind normally used for painting) to rub it all over derailleurs, cogsets, bearings, etc. It is plenty effective for removing even ...


9

As a bicycle mechanic in the Netherlands, I always advice not to use a waterhose. Rain doesn't get into your bearings and chain, while water from a waterhose sometimes does get in nasty places. I sometimes see chains or even a bearing which is rusted because the oil/grease is 'hosed away'. You can safely use water out of a bucket, with a sponge. But do not ...


8

From time to time, I soak it in water with a bit of glicerin soap ("neutral", recommended on manuals) disolved, in a bucket. I leave it a whole day submerged (have to put something heavy over the helmet, otherwise it floats out). My rationale is this: when you submerge, the natural diffusion process inside liquids makes the soap penetrate the sweat, and ...


8

In the winter when the garden hose is disconnected I use a watering can filled with warm water to wash the dirt/salt off the bike before taking it in. I use mild detergent soap to speed up the removal of oil and grease then pour the warm water from the can to remove the soap.


8

Every two or three days is excessive. Biweekly should serve, even in winter months. The simplest thing would be to buy a chain cleaner and use it when you feel it's needed. Parktool provides excellent instructions as well as a suggested schedule for maintenance. In addition, you should switch to a heavier synthetic lube in the winter. I've personally had no ...


8

Simple, yet powerful solution - pour max 1 teaspoon of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda, found in any store) into the shoes before or after wearing them. It will kill the bacteria and any other "stuff" that produces bad smell. It has no negative effects on skin whatsoever, except when applying it to freshly shaven skin - as it may cause inflammation of the ...


8

I would avoid doing this. If the Teflon lube has any kind of solvent in it (which it probably does to carry the Teflon), it will break down the grease in the bottom bracket. Eventually, the grease will thin out enough that it will flow out of the bottom bracket, and No More Lube=A Very Bad Thing. If you are using a basic cartridge bottom bracket, they are ...


8

I use a portable weed sprayer with warm water in it. Like one of these - Portable Pressure Sprayer. They aren't high enough pressure to cause problems to bearings and light enough to carry up and down stairs in an apartment building/small enough to store under a kitchen sink.


8

Hang the bicycle upside down, on a stand if you have one, but you can also simply suspend it with a bit of rope. Next, you can easily clean the inside of the tube with a bottle cleaner dipped in solvent. Since the bike is upside down, there is no need to remove the cranks and BB. Gasoline or paint thinner works well to remove grease. The last bit of grease ...


7

Grab some of the disinfecting wipes in the round containers that you normally use for kitchen counters, etc. I like the Clorox brand in the yellow (Lemon Fresh!). Wrap around bars and squeeze a bit as you twist/rotate in the same direction as the wrap. With cork based wrap this is fairly effective. With some of the slicker surfaced wraps (Lizard, etc), it's ...


7

After cleaning I give the bolts a small squirt of WD40 followed by a good rub down. This leaves a very fine film of oil that won't hold dirt but is just enough to stave off the rust if done regularly. The spray also displaces (WD, water displacement, geddit?) any water left from cleaning in any little gaps.


7

Where possible, replace with stainless fasteners. Things like water bottle bracket bolts are readily available in stainless at a good hardware store. But most fasteners on a good quality bike are stainless to begin with, so it may be that you're not seeing "rust" per se but rather a sort of corrosion that can form on stainless.


7

Park Tool recommends their own product: I used to hate gloves for anything (car, bike, whatever) until I got used to wearing them while in Iraq and Afghanistan. Originally I used the Mechanix Wear gloves and I still like them for working on my car:


7

Chain will rust always after washing (or even light rain or a puddle of water), if not re-lubed. I think this is detrimental to the chain, as it removes material from the rollers and thus contributes to chain stretch. Bolts for stem, handlebars etc. seem to always like to rust after rain or washing. I don't think it is a big deal, but it ruins the look of ...


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