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17

It's a Shimano SPD cleat. There are a few different models, but they are all cross compatible. You can reuse the old ones if you can unscrew it, but new pair should be under 20€, too. EDIT: Looks like this is an old Shimano cleat, like this one: http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/reviews/dzr/ovis/10.jpg. Modern ones and most copies have a sharp angled "...


16

Your goal is to apply torque to the cleat as you would with your foot in a shoe. So essentially you need something like a gigantic flat screwdriver. I have a mini crowbar that would do the job, for example, but if you have any metal tyre levers they might be big enough. Slacken off any tension adjusting screw first


15

Look Keo 2 and Look Keo are Look's current/previous range and they are compatible with each other. Look Delta are Look's earlier range. I'm afraid they are not compatible with Keo's or Keo 2's SPD-SL are Shimano's version of road pedals. These aren't compatible with Look products, (neither therefore are Look products compatible with them). Checking out ...


15

The simplest thing to do would be to buy new cleats. If you're absolutely set on re-using this cleat, there is a tool called a screw extractor that lets you tap a small reverse-threaded hole in your existing screw. You'll need a power drill to use it. You will at minimum need new screws. You might be able to fit a hacksaw blade between the cleat and sole to ...


13

Yes, you can use them with normal shoes, but as you predict, it isn't very comfortable, especially if your shoes have thin, flexible soles. Also, there's a risk of your foot slipping off, particularly in the wet. There are various options to temporarily convert clip pedals into ordinary flat ones. Fly pedals BBB BPD FeetRest pedal adaptors (SPD only)


12

This is part comment, part answer, but too long to fit in a comment, so here we go. Personally, I use SPD, and when I ride with a group, everyone else has SPD-SL or LOOK. I'm usually clipped in and across the intersection before they're clipped in. Either I'm just really good at clipping in, or SPD are designed to be easier to get clipped in to. Even the ...


11

Doing this with the other hole empty is hurting your cause. Using another fully lubricated bolt in good condition to relieve preload sometimes makes this situation go easy and is always helpful. You mount an SPD cleat by alternating back and fourth until both bolts are torqued since preload on one relieves it from the other, so you need to employ the same ...


10

Whilst the shoes are marketed for SPD-SL cleats because that is the Shimano system and you have Shimano shoes, this is really referring to what we call a 'three-bolt' pattern. Both SPD-SL and the look cleats are a 3 bolt pattern so the cleats are compatible with the shoes. See how there are another two bolt holes in the middle of the three-bolt pattern - in ...


9

Use water-pump-pliers or locking pliers (vise-grip). Grip the cleat and turn it either clock-wise or anti-clock-wise Alternatively a medium sized screwdriver used as a lever at the rear 'nose' of the cleat will pop it out. Mind fingers and eyes, though! It might be a good idea for both methods to reduce the spring tension of the pedal by turning the ...


9

First, I should mention that when pedaling, we generally want the cleats' lateral position to be such that our knees are in line with the center of the pedal. This is a common principle in bike fit, as illustrated by the picture below courtesy of Rick Schultz, posted on the Bikefit blog. You correctly deduce that having the wrong stance width may cause knee ...


7

UPDATE: I use Fly Pedals now when I want to convert my clipless pedals into regular pedals. They are made of machined aluminum, light weight, and lock together so you can put them in your pocket. They cost $50 plus cleats. enter link description here This company (started on Kickstarter) makes flat platforms with straps on top and cleats on the bottom. ...


7

Do you mean it's stuck? It might not be that you've got the wrong shoe in the pedal but that it's rather stiff (the pedals seem to arrive at up with tight springs) and holding it in your hands you can't get much force. The actual cleat is symmetrical. Try putting a crank arm (or whole bike) on the pedal, and putting your foot in the shoe, then twist your ...


7

Yes, this shoe also accepts the MTB-style two bolt cleats. Three-bolt and two-bolt cleat pattern fits all major road and mountain pedals. (from https://www.specialized.com/jp/en/sport-road-shoes/p/117510?color=&searchText=61217-3238) They will accept Shimano SPD, Crankbrothers and other MTB cleats. However, the sole will get deformed or damaged. With ...


6

One thing that may help a lot is shifting some load weight forwards. In other situations I've found that a surprisingly small amount of weight shifted from behind the back axle to the front forks improves handling a lot. For example rather than mounting a D lock behind a child seat, I put it on the front forks. That's something like 1% of the total weight, ...


5

These pedals appear to the Look PP66 - use the Delta cleats for them. The red cleats give you rotational float, black for fixed position. As others have pointed out, the Keo cleats cannot be used, as they are smaller and a different shape than the Delta.


5

TL;DR : Having a quality pedal means that it will always be in the same position when you need to clip in and will make you life much easier when starting. Part of the problem might be the "cheapness" of the pedals, let me explain : I ride Look pedals and have been using Look Keo Carbon pedals, they are middle range (more expensive than the Easy ...


5

I don't think those are the 646, but the cleat you probably still want to use is the Look Delta cleat. Go to a bike shop and try the delta cleat in there. In the olden days, everyone was rebadging Look cleats as their own. The 646 (and many old pedals) use Look Delta cleats (aka the original/traditional/ARC Look cleat; NOT the Keo cleat). The 646 should ...


5

Shimano pedals are usually brought up as a good beginner pedal because they are readily available just about everywhere, have several low-cost options, have standards that much of the industry follow for cleats and cross compatibility, and require little maintenance. As you said, they don't get clogged up easily, but it can happen. It just takes a LOT of ...


5

I think it's important to mention that pedals aren't simply "road" or "mountain" pedals, but that there are pedals designed for many different purposes. Most people will classify "road race" pedals such as Look Keo, Shimano SPD-SL, and Speedplay as "road pedals" and most other pedals including Shimano SPD and CrankBrothers will fall into the "mountain ...


5

Just insert an 8mm Allen key into the pedal axle. Then grab the key and the heel of the shoe and bring both hands together.


5

These pedals will take the old style Look Delta cleats, NOT the Keo-type. The cleats are readily available from Look retailers. You can have them with the same specifications as the Keo cleats, in black, grey and red with 0°, 3° and 6° sideways free rotation. Be aware though that the pedals have built-in sideways freedom of movement, toggled by the slotted ...


5

In the automotive industry, "aftermarket" refers to, from Wikipedia, all the secondary market for all vehicle parts and accessories, after the original sale, including replacement parts and accessories, whether made by the OEM or not. I don't frequently hear this term used in the bicycle industry, but it does apply. Licensed copies In this ...


5

You know the debate between OEM and aftermarket parts in auto insurance and repair? There’s a bit of that issue going on here, but I would generally come down more on the OEM side. Exustar and Xpedo are two companies that make pedals and cleats based on Look’s Keo system. I don’t know if these are/were licensed copies, where they went to Look and paid a fee, ...


5

A dremel/rotary tool made this really easy last time it occurred to me. Just cut a slot, load a flat head bit into a ratchet, and zip it right out. Cut the slot nice and deep.


5

I find that look cleats work fine, until the corners start chipping off or breaking. At that point, you don't have positive foot retention and a foot can come off the pedal far easier. For me, my left foot cleat wears out faster than the right, because I stop with left foot down at the lights, and I tend to mount the bike from the left side, which induces a ...


4

Cleats are the bottom attachment to shoes. Most road shoes use a 3 hole attachment, which is a standard size. Most pedal manufacturers have their own cleat style, but all 3-hole cleats use the same spacing as far as I know. Your pedals may come with suitable cleats if you're buying them new, if not make sure you buy 'look keo' compatible cleats. There is ...


4

I use these spd's: http://road.cc/content/review/43776-shimano-pd-m520-spd-pedal They are double sided, so you never get the wrong side to clip in They are cheap They are durable The shoes you buy with them usually allow (easyish) walking when required Can buy both road & mountain biking shoes - with a single pedal type I know that's more of a "comment"...


4

Those look like Shimano mountain SPD PD-M545 pedals: Looks like a pretty good match to the picture on the Shimano site, but if you don't see a Shimano logo on them, they could be third party compatible pedals. The cleats look like this: I'm not aware of a guide that compares all pedal styles, but there are not that many pedal types in common use and most ...


4

Yes you can. No it's not going to be comfortable. You're more likely to slip off the pedals. One alternative is to get double sided pedals where one side of the pedal has an SPD mount and the other side is a flat pedal. I've been running Shimano M324 pedals on my commuter so I can hop on with casual shoes or use my cycling shoes for more power on longer ...


4

There is nothing to stop you from getting on your bike in regular trainers instead of shoes with cleats. you won't damage your pedals in any way as long as you don't have a rock lodged in the sole of your shoe. The problem, as far as I can see it, is that it is just not very comfortable due to the small surface area and flexible sole of the shoe. Your feet ...


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