25

Terminology is important here. Pedal Clips (refer here) are straps that tighten around the shoe. Clipless, such as SPD have a cleat - refer here Toe clips are not common these days - but still used by some (touring and fixed hub bikes) more niche applications. I assume you are talking about SPD style clipless pedals, but the following discussion does not ...


23

For context, I ride in the North Shore of Vancouver, BC, Canada, which is an area famous for its steep and technically challenging trails. I'm comfortable riding black diamond-rated trails. Here's an example of one (not my video): Personally, I ride SPD. I've tried Crankbrothers for six months, but I didn't like the feel, and ...


22

Quick release pedals as you describe do exist. They are often marketed in Japan as "Rinko" pedals as they were developed to as part of the Japanese tradition taking apart full size bikes for transport on trains: Currently, MKS makes these pedals (if you do an internet search for "MKS Rinko" you can find a distributor), they branded them with the "EZY" ...


20

You're not going to break them, and really, their advice is too complicated. To clip in, just stomp your foot on the pedal in the right spot. If you don't get it right, try again. Pretty quickly it will become second nature. To clip out, rotate your heel outward. That's it. This pedal lets you set the disengagement resistance with a screw on the back if you ...


19

First let's clarify the difference between "clipless" and "clip" pedals. They are confusing terms as both have clips. Clip pedals (which I prefer to call cages) look like this: Cages have the advantage that they can be used with normal shoes. To get your foot into them you push it in from the rear and (optionally) reach down and tighten the strap. In my ...


19

They are nice to walk Proper fitted MTB shoes with SPD cleats are quite comfortable to walk in, at least for non-marathon distances (say, less than 10 km a day). They are still less ideal when compared to normal walking/running shoes, however, for these reasons: 1. They are stiffer than regular shoes. 2. They have less gripping surface because the metal ...


14

Clipless pedals let you pull up a bit and road shoes are rigid-ish, so you can get some more power from each turn (of course, you're using your muscles in a bit of a different way). This also gives a bit of a different pressure distribution than platform pedals (look at the layout of say, a Look pedal versus a platform pedal). In an off road situation, they ...


14

I'm trying to solve the same problem, and after some searching I've ordered something like this: It's a plastic pad that you clip on clipless pedals to ride them with normal shoes. I'm not sure about their efficacy with wet weather and sure they don't allow pulling upwards, but for riding to work I think they would do. As Criggie suggests in the comments, ...


13

Yes, you can use them with normal shoes, but as you predict, it isn't very comfortable, especially if your shoes have thin, flexible soles. Also, there's a risk of your foot slipping off, particularly in the wet. There are various options to temporarily convert clip pedals into ordinary flat ones. Fly pedals BBB BPD FeetRest pedal adaptors (SPD only)


12

On my commute bike, I use 2 sided combo pedals with SPD+platforms on both sides like these PD-M424 SPD Dual Platform Pedals I've tried using clip-on SPD platforms with regular SPD's, and found that those platforms are not very stable, can be difficult to snap in/out, and tend to fall off - they might be ok for a quick trip down the block, but won't stand up ...


11

In my humble experience with extensive crashing during mountain biking, including a lot of over-the-bar experiences and a few cases when I broke bones, before you hit the dirt, clipless pedals magically disengage themselves. In reality, being clipped is your least problem. You really need to slowly stop the bike and then fall on a side to still remain being ...


11

In my experience you mainly want them to be comfortable. But there are several considerations: If the shoes are too short your toes will bump the ends, and this can become torturous 75 mile into a centurion. On the other hand, if the shoes are loose your feet will slide back and forth. Not only can this be painful, but it means that you will not have a ...


10

I just leave a pair of shoes at the office and change shoes when I get there so I don't have to take them back and forth. It's amazing how much space shoes take up in a backpack/pannier. I think that even the "walkable" shoes aren't that comfortable to be in all day. And any cycling shoes that you did want to walk around in all day would lose a lot of the ...


10

This is part comment, part answer, but too long to fit in a comment, so here we go. Personally, I use SPD, and when I ride with a group, everyone else has SPD-SL or LOOK. I'm usually clipped in and across the intersection before they're clipped in. Either I'm just really good at clipping in, or SPD are designed to be easier to get clipped in to. Even the ...


10

I taught my daughter to use clipless pedals by putting her bike on a wind trainer while she watched television. I got her pedals that are flat on one side with SPD's on the other side. A random intervals I'd call "left foot down", or "right foot down", trying to time my call for the most inconvenient moment. And as I mentioned in comments, I never did tell ...


10

Whilst the shoes are marketed for SPD-SL cleats because that is the Shimano system and you have Shimano shoes, this is really referring to what we call a 'three-bolt' pattern. Both SPD-SL and the look cleats are a 3 bolt pattern so the cleats are compatible with the shoes. See how there are another two bolt holes in the middle of the three-bolt pattern - in ...


9

To answer your question directly, you certainly can use clipless over long distances. However, scientific studies have actually shown that clipless pedals offer no discernible performance advantages over long distances. They have shown that a small advantage can be gained on sprints, but that's about it. That said, many cyclists do report increased ...


9

Addressing your last paragraph, basically you're right: There are pedals that are SPD on one side and flat on the other. I've only ridden them in normal shoes but found them the worst of both worlds. On two of my bikes I have shimano M424s which are SPD on both sides with a plastic cage around them so you can wear normal shoes. In dry weather, for short ...


9

You need shoes, cleats and pedals all to be compatible. (There's also an implication that you have two feet, and nothing unusual there.) Shoes have to fit your feet comfortably, with a close fit around the rear and across the instep. Personally I find a slight roominess around the toes to be ideal. You can get shoes with laces, velcro, ratchets, elastic ...


9

No, you cannot break the cleats nor the shoes or pedals with any reasonable movements. They are made to withstand even large forces directly pulling the cleats from the shoes and various forces that happen in heavy terrain. Jest turn your heel outward and that should unclip you easily (at least that's what I do in the MTB pedals made by CB but I believe ...


8

You ask about danger, when/where to use, and when/where not to use, so...: There's the danger that you forget to unclip when you stop, and fall to your side. This is a real danger, but not a serious one except if your fitness is a bit low (risk of wrist, shoulder, hip or ankle lesion). You should then practice a lot first, both clip and unclip while riding ...


8

It seems like scientists tend to test athletic performance. The actual benefits of clipless pedals are: If you are cycling fast, you get a lot of unanticipated jolts and vibration which can make you slip off of the pedals, particularly if it is wet, muddy or bumpy. Clipless pedals keep you locked in. If your visibility is impaired by riding in the dark, or ...


8

I had Shimano M324 SPD pedals for years on my commuter, they're a platform on one side and a SPD clip on the other. I found them to be an acceptable tradeoff for what I was looking for, which was primarily clipped in riding with occasional regular shoes. They are easy enough to clip into (as the flat part of the pedal tends to end up face down), and work ...


7

I have been using biking shoes with SPD cleats for nearly 20 years, and I definitely fell and got banged up as a new user of clipless pedals. I have since learned how to get in and out of them to the point where it is second nature and I hardly think about it at stoplights, etc. I find them especially valuable for damp conditions, when regular shoes would ...


7

Aside from what the others have said here (with details on how to use clipless pedals), your original question was can you ride long distances in them. That is one of the things they are designed for. By keeping your foot exactly placed on the pedal, they maximize your pedaling efficiency. You foot never falls off the pedal. I rode over 3,000 miles last ...


7

Generally the cleats come with some shims for exactly this problem. If you have the box with the original pedals look around for some thin cleat shaped shims. If you can't find them, you can hand make shims out of plastic milk bottles, or ask around at the dealer to see if they have any spares handy.


7

Yes, they are a thing. They are normally seem on folding bikes, but quick release pedals do exists. MKS make a range of pedals with "EZY" in the name. These pedals come with a collar that your screw into the crank, and then you pull back the outside of the collar and insert the pedal. I assume that all the EZY pedals are interchangable (although be careful ...


7

Do you mean it's stuck? It might not be that you've got the wrong shoe in the pedal but that it's rather stiff (the pedals seem to arrive at up with tight springs) and holding it in your hands you can't get much force. The actual cleat is symmetrical. Try putting a crank arm (or whole bike) on the pedal, and putting your foot in the shoe, then twist your ...


7

IMO you want your shoes to be a "generously" large fit when at rest. Not so large they slide around on your feet but still biggish while remaining comfortable. Why? Your feet will subtly swell during exercise, making a good fit into a tight fit. That's why your slightly large fit becomes good after some time. Naturally this assumes your socks are the ...


7

Those bolts need to be secured very carefully. Use a torque wrench set to 5Nm to tighten the bolts, alternating a quarter turn at a time between them. Use plenty of threadlocker on the threads. Use grease or antiseize on the underside of the bolt heads. It’s also best to put some under that “8” shaped piece so it doesn’t rust onto the cleat. Clean the sole ...


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