New answers tagged

-5

If every time I tip over while learning clipless means I could break the frame, this seems a possibly terribly expensive proposition. I agree, it is. There are few solutions: Use a frame with a metallic frame and fork. Metals can only get damaged by bending, immediate cracking, or delayed fatigue cracking. The first two can be immediately observed and the ...


5

Any lightweight road frame of any material can be dented very easily. As long as you don’t see a mark on the frame indicating that it touched the ground, there’s nothing to worry about.


7

In practice, there is one thing I've seen enough to call it a pattern: aero/teardrop carbon seatstays and chainstays cracking near the joints after being flexed excessively during a crash. Some of these combine very light construction with a very flat joint in the side to side direction. Some frames like this you could probably break by falling over at low ...


2

Most of what you need to know has already been explained in the other answers: No need to "push down hard on the heel of the shoe" when unclipping. A simple twist of the foot suffices. Adjusting the tension on the mechanism is important. Higher tension means less likelihood of accidentally unclipping, but does mean it's a little harder to get in ...


-1

Gotex socks. Yes, they sound gimmicky and uncomfortable. However, I used to hike 20 to 30 miles a day in boggy terrain, and my feet stayed toasty warm and dry! You should wear thin merino wool socks inside for best effect. That said, REI sells waterproof biking socks for cheaper made for the job.


2

Those Cleats are practically indestructible! You will be running in those shoes over rocks and gravel in a race! Kick and stomp in and twist out. Way safer then toe clips for MTB!


3

I suspect you're doing this in the air, before fitting the pedals to your bike. Or possibly you're putting a bare cleat in the pedal. Either way, its really hard to get things working like that. Instead, fit a pedal to your bike, and install a cleat on your shoe. Then back off the release tension to minimum to begin with if your pedals have a tension ...


20

You're not going to break them, and really, their advice is too complicated. To clip in, just stomp your foot on the pedal in the right spot. If you don't get it right, try again. Pretty quickly it will become second nature. To clip out, rotate your heel outward. That's it. This pedal lets you set the disengagement resistance with a screw on the back if you ...


9

No, you cannot break the cleats nor the shoes or pedals with any reasonable movements. They are made to withstand even large forces directly pulling the cleats from the shoes and various forces that happen in heavy terrain. Jest turn your heel outward and that should unclip you easily (at least that's what I do in the MTB pedals made by CB but I believe ...


2

There is a Master's thesis by Brandon Kuhn (2012) that compares flate, toe clips and clipless pedals and their power output. They measured significantly higher power outputs for sprints with clipless pedals. Mean power output was higher using clipless pedals ( = 617 watts, SD = 112) than toe-strap ( = 572 watts, SD = 77), and flat ( = 566 watts, SD = 83). ...


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