Hot answers tagged

99

In places where there are lots of bikes, most people who are riding them are making short journeys purely for transport. For a short ride of a few kilometers, it really doesn't matter what you're wearing. Any clothes that are comfortable to wear in general will be comfortable to wear on a bike for fifteen minutes. People who are riding longer distances, ...


69

Local here, have lived in Amsterdam for just over a year and a half, through the cold wet winter. I'm not a Dutchie, but have embraced the fiets lifestyle here. Let me just say that the jeans you get in Amsterdam are the same as what you would buy anywhere else. I ride in Levis 511 jeans every day and have no problems. People here more or less ride in all ...


56

It is possible, but only in certain conditions. I live in a tropical country, so, 20 degrees centigrade is considered cold here. My conmute to work is almost flat, with only one climb, something a very steep 300 meters. If it were not for that, I'd be able to get to the office almost completely dry. What's the trick? I use a hardtail mountain bike with a ...


32

Everyone else has offered good advice, but let me point out one simple thing for you: Almost no matter how hot it is or how hard I'm riding, I'm not really sweaty until I stop moving. That's because 1) I'm wearing bike clothes designed to wick moisture and evaporate it quickly, and 2) almost no matter what the weather is doing, while I'm moving I'm headed ...


30

2 pro-tips for not smelling bad. One, and this may seem odd, but cool down before you change. If you can hang out in what you rode in on for like, 15 minutes, you can avoid immediately sweating into the clothes you've just changed into. For me, I've got a regular morning call so I show up 10 minutes before that, get through the 10 minute conference call ...


30

The short answer is that, in practical terms, the difference isn't great. The longer answer requires some explanation of "visual conspicuity." In optical engineering, conspicuity is the study of what makes things "conspicuous," and some researchers split the tasks into "detection" and "identification" (see, for example, the works of A. Toet et al, such as ...


28

A thread on this subject on Bikeforums ran to pages and pages... Some expressing utter horror that a bicyclist would feel the need to be armed, others ridiculing the whole idea, others with decent suggestions. I'm a cop, I know that numbers of cyclists ride in conditions that are less than optimal. We have had armed robberies and muggings of cyclists here ...


28

While you can certainly wear BMX armour, or possibly even use motorbike armour and wear full face helmets, I would put much more emphasis on changing the way you cycle to reduce the risk from cars. You say cars turn without seeing cyclists- well, you have two options: become more visible. It isn't high fashion, but wear colours and lights, flashing and ...


26

Even a short sprint or uphill effort can make a big difference in how sweaty I am when I get to the office. Maintain a consistently low effort, using low gears for any uphills. Panniers are good, since backpacks and messenger bags not only insulate, but also hold your shirt directly against your sweaty back. Often I'll put my shirt in my pannier and just ...


24

You are surely aware that there is an industry out there that tries to sell you things you only marginally 'need' - special clothing for any sport is not unaffected by that. There is certainly a gain by wearing special cloth (and shoes) while biking, but unless you are seriously exercising or training for a competition, the difference is marginal. Of course,...


23

No, you will not ride faster in any meaningful way unless you're doing time trials at an elite level where mere seconds (or less) of improvement are gained through optimizing a long list of equipment (with clothing in the middle of that list). As always, the overwhelming determinant of performance is training. The real reason for wearing a jersey is the ...


23

Jeans aren't as bad as you think. I think the biggest factors are short journeys, mild climate, and being used to it. With efficient infrastructure this can account for a lot of commuting. Apart from the efficient infrastructure that covers most bike commuting in the UK as well, and most people here don't get changed. I sometimes don't get the chance to ...


21

Studded tires are a must on ice. They are expensive, but well worth it! A couple of points to consider that have not been mentioned: Footwear: Winter specific riding shoes or boots. For mountain biking and cross, I ride with Lake boots. On the road, I use an older pair of road shoes that have been stretched to accommodate thick wool socks and neoprene shoe ...


21

Do you wear underwear with them? Can I wear shorts over them? Absolutely not. Nothing over or under, just the bike shorts. Do I really need them? For 200 miles? Hell yeah. Your ass will thank you.


20

My best guess is the hole would allow a headphone cable to run down the collar, through the inside of the shirt, and into the pocket.


20

Other than wicking sweat and drying quickly, there's nothing special about them. Any high quality athletic sock marketed for another sport will be comparable.


20

Wool, wool, and wool. Wool undergarments. Wool over garments. (Maybe tweed as well.) Wool is a amazing material. It tends to perform better than synthetics (although the gap is closing) for keeping you warm when it is wet and cold outside. On descents people also used to just either tough it out or did life hacks such as putting newspaper down the front of ...


19

First: merino wool boxers. EDIT: Also windproof boxers, see other answer below Second: Vest and short tights are very little for ~5°C, raining. You are losing a huge amount of body heat through your arms and legs, and this leaves little for body parts without active muscles. Wear more, and your balls will be warmer too.


18

Start with short sleeves, arm warmers and a light jacket and layer. Everybody has different tolerance for temperature changes, but here is what I normally wear on my upper body. 65°F (18°C) or higher: Short Sleeve Jersey 55-65°F (13-18°C) Short Sleeve Jersey with Arm Warmers 45-55°F (7-13°C) Short Sleeve Jersey and a Jacket/...


17

I am also wearing a waterproof jacket over it which isn't very breathable Well there's your problem. The most wickable, breathable material in the world isn't going to achieve those properties if you put a plastic bag over it. If you don't want to be caught out in the rain, keep the raincoat in a backpack/messengerbag/pannier/whatever until it's needed. ...


16

YELLOW - and according to EN471... There are regulations for high visibility clothing used by people that work on highways. Their employers have a duty of care to make sure they are in the correct HV wear. In the UK the standard is BS EN471 and this applies pretty much the same across the whole EU. 3M - the people that pioneered high visibility clothing - ...


16

Frankly, what you want is impossible. A good bicycle helmet provides substantial protection from head-impacts-pavement and head-impacts-vehicle events, but basically only those where the velocities involved are small. The helmet functions by slowing the skull down slowly, avoiding the skull-brain impact which often does the most damage. But, where the ...


16

I guess it's a matter of opinion, and cyclists have a lot of rules, but personally I would go for it. You were actually on the team after all. I think that the rule #17 from the above link applies here. Personally, I'd rather wear old kit from a team I was personally on than wear kit from a pro team that I have no affiliation with, or even non-pro-kit with ...


15

Why not add a fairing? There are designs that add a windshield, some that provide protection down to the knee, some that go further down, and in the extreme case there's full nose-cones. This will deflect a lot of the wind around you instead of into you. You're already riding a recumbent, a fairing isn't going to make it any worse, and the weight penalty ...


14

The human eye is more sensitive to some colours, peak sensitivity is at the yellow-green portion of the visible spectrum. So generally speaking, a yellow vest or jacket should be better than an orange one.


14

Safe is a relative term in this instance. A shirt might protect you in a fall, but only just. You'll know immediately whether a shirt can protect your skin from sticks, branches, and prickers dangling into the trail. If you were going fast enough flying insects may even make an impact, though I can't imagine it'd be terribly painful. Shirts do offer some ...


14

Oftentimes, you sweat the most just when you finish the ride, as you've just been pedaling at full effort, but you don't get the wind generated by the moving bike. And then you need to stand around in a warm space, like I need to wait in the very warm freight elevator lobby. Try to take it easy especially for the end of the ride, and hold something cold (...


14

What worked for me in an admittedly flat terrain - I used a heartrate monitor. In my spare time I calibrated it a bit - at which heartrate do I get sweaty? Then on the trip to work, I make sure that I stay about 5% below that rate. At 45, my sweat heartrate was about 110, so I stayed below 105. My trip is 21 km in each direction.


14

There are different types of logos which get worn for different reasons. Bike clothing may include logos associated with: Clothing manufacturers: An otherwise plain jersey will often include the logo of the manufacturer. This is common for athletic clothing in general. Employers: Companies often make jerseys with their logos that (presumably satisfied) ...


14

I think there is a case to be made that you will be less visible in dark colours. Anecdotally whenever I look down the road at a group of cyclists, it's the ones in large blocks of bold colours (not necessarily fluorescent) whom I can spot first. Bright but mixed patterns of colour are also less visible from a distance. I'm not saying anyone should be ...


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