Hot answers tagged

101

In places where there are lots of bikes, most people who are riding them are making short journeys purely for transport. For a short ride of a few kilometers, it really doesn't matter what you're wearing. Any clothes that are comfortable to wear in general will be comfortable to wear on a bike for fifteen minutes. People who are riding longer distances, ...


72

Local here, have lived in Amsterdam for just over a year and a half, through the cold wet winter. I'm not a Dutchie, but have embraced the fiets lifestyle here. Let me just say that the jeans you get in Amsterdam are the same as what you would buy anywhere else. I ride in Levis 511 jeans every day and have no problems. People here more or less ride in all ...


57

It is possible, but only in certain conditions. I live in a tropical country, so, 20 degrees centigrade is considered cold here. My conmute to work is almost flat, with only one climb, something a very steep 300 meters. If it were not for that, I'd be able to get to the office almost completely dry. What's the trick? I use a hardtail mountain bike with a ...


40

Absolutely. The thicker your thighs, the more friction, and the quicker the pants loose their thread. This happens relatively irrespective of material, even jeans can wear through rather quickly. I guess that specialized bike wear uses materials that are much less prone to this, but I have not tested that myself. Of course, saddles with sharp edges do ...


34

Everyone else has offered good advice, but let me point out one simple thing for you: Almost no matter how hot it is or how hard I'm riding, I'm not really sweaty until I stop moving. That's because 1) I'm wearing bike clothes designed to wick moisture and evaporate it quickly, and 2) almost no matter what the weather is doing, while I'm moving I'm headed ...


26

Even a short sprint or uphill effort can make a big difference in how sweaty I am when I get to the office. Maintain a consistently low effort, using low gears for any uphills. Panniers are good, since backpacks and messenger bags not only insulate, but also hold your shirt directly against your sweaty back. Often I'll put my shirt in my pannier and just ...


25

You are surely aware that there is an industry out there that tries to sell you things you only marginally 'need' - special clothing for any sport is not unaffected by that. There is certainly a gain by wearing special cloth (and shoes) while biking, but unless you are seriously exercising or training for a competition, the difference is marginal. Of course,...


24

Do you wear underwear with them? Can I wear shorts over them? Absolutely not. Nothing over or under, just the bike shorts. Do I really need them? For 200 miles? Hell yeah. Your ass will thank you.


23

Jeans aren't as bad as you think. I think the biggest factors are short journeys, mild climate, and being used to it. With efficient infrastructure this can account for a lot of commuting. Apart from the efficient infrastructure that covers most bike commuting in the UK as well, and most people here don't get changed. I sometimes don't get the chance to ...


20

Wool, wool, and wool. Wool undergarments. Wool over garments. (Maybe tweed as well.) Wool is a amazing material. It tends to perform better than synthetics (although the gap is closing) for keeping you warm when it is wet and cold outside. On descents people also used to just either tough it out or did life hacks such as putting newspaper down the front of ...


19

First: merino wool boxers. EDIT: Also windproof boxers, see other answer below Second: Vest and short tights are very little for ~5°C, raining. You are losing a huge amount of body heat through your arms and legs, and this leaves little for body parts without active muscles. Wear more, and your balls will be warmer too.


18

I am also wearing a waterproof jacket over it which isn't very breathable Well there's your problem. The most wickable, breathable material in the world isn't going to achieve those properties if you put a plastic bag over it. If you don't want to be caught out in the rain, keep the raincoat in a backpack/messengerbag/pannier/whatever until it's needed. ...


16

What worked for me in an admittedly flat terrain - I used a heartrate monitor. In my spare time I calibrated it a bit - at which heartrate do I get sweaty? Then on the trip to work, I make sure that I stay about 5% below that rate. At 45, my sweat heartrate was about 110, so I stayed below 105. My trip is 21 km in each direction.


16

I guess it's a matter of opinion, and cyclists have a lot of rules, but personally I would go for it. You were actually on the team after all. I think that the rule #17 from the above link applies here. Personally, I'd rather wear old kit from a team I was personally on than wear kit from a pro team that I have no affiliation with, or even non-pro-kit with ...


16

As someone who biked daily for transportation and recreation for years, I can tell you it doesn't take any miracle to do it in street clothes. David Richerby already mentioned that most practical bike trips are short. Mine were usually 10-20 minutes. But many times I've gone on recreational rides of 2-4 hours. And I've never owned any special "biking ...


15

Oftentimes, you sweat the most just when you finish the ride, as you've just been pedaling at full effort, but you don't get the wind generated by the moving bike. And then you need to stand around in a warm space, like I need to wait in the very warm freight elevator lobby. Try to take it easy especially for the end of the ride, and hold something cold (...


15

Why not add a fairing? There are designs that add a windshield, some that provide protection down to the knee, some that go further down, and in the extreme case there's full nose-cones. This will deflect a lot of the wind around you instead of into you. You're already riding a recumbent, a fairing isn't going to make it any worse, and the weight penalty ...


14

There are different types of logos which get worn for different reasons. Bike clothing may include logos associated with: Clothing manufacturers: An otherwise plain jersey will often include the logo of the manufacturer. This is common for athletic clothing in general. Employers: Companies often make jerseys with their logos that (presumably satisfied) ...


14

I think there is a case to be made that you will be less visible in dark colours. Anecdotally whenever I look down the road at a group of cyclists, it's the ones in large blocks of bold colours (not necessarily fluorescent) whom I can spot first. Bright but mixed patterns of colour are also less visible from a distance. I'm not saying anyone should be ...


13

Thankfully I never ride without gloves. The light weight gloves with padded leather in the palms is all you need - they are cheap, comfortable and effective - what more could you ask for. I had a crash after my bike was tampered with and the front wheel fell off. I am a programmer, and although I emptied the company first aid kit of dressings, and could not ...


13

The simple answer for professional riders is that clothing is regulated by the UCI. Part 1 Section 3 of the Regulations of the UCI say, When competing, all riders shall wear a jersey with sleeves and a pair of shorts, possibly in the form of a one-piece skinsuit. By shorts it is understood that these are shorts that come above the knee. Sleeveless jerseys ...


12

I saw this question a couple of weeks ago and was interested in it, I have just got back from spending 2 nights at the Tour de France where I happened to stay in the same hotel as one of the teams. So I asked one of them. I'm afraid it has absolutely nothing to do with protection, or with ventilation. In fact you hit upon the disadvantage of a skinsuit in ...


12

It depends a lot on you. I live in Illinois and I'll go out in a T-shirt and shorts in the 40's for bike rides. But if you want some additional warmth in the around 40F and 3 miles, I'd say maybe some thin gloves (I have a set of Underarmour coldgear running gloves which are useful for longer rides in the 30s) and a hoodie - you might be cold for the first ...


12

Yikes. 200 miles, just like that? Have you been training for it at all? I'm not talking about the endurance aspect -- I'm assuming you're in good enough shape to even consider it -- I'm talking about the physical act of your rear end being on a bike seat for 15-20 hours. Yes, you need the bike shorts, 'taint no question about it. You also need to be ready ...


12

For most parts of the body a second layer of moderately wind-blocking fabric makes a massive difference -- so another pair of unpadded cycling shorts would go a long way. The rain is likely to have been part of the issue though -- windchill on wet skin (or wet porous fabric) is a big deal. Waterproof overtrousers would deal with that but tend to get ...


12

I'd invest in a pair of bike shorts. Casual riders going short distances on big comfy saddles can get away with casual or regular sports clothing. You won’t be able to do that riding significant distance on a sports saddle. Bike shorts have padding, obviously, but are also constructed so there is no seam between rider and saddle. Regular sports shorts ...


12

It depends. I have had one saddle that wore through pants quickly. It had an embroidered logo. After removing the embroidery (which took quite some effort) I did not have the problem with that saddle either. Sharp edges or cracked surface could have the same effect. Cycling specific trousers, both lycra and baggy, are made of slippery fabric. The low ...


12

Mountain bike shorts are ideal for commuting. If they fit, are comfortable and you like the look of them, you won't find a better commute short. If you a fast rider, over 11km the extra drag of baggies will cost you a few seconds over a lycra skin suit. However, if you are riding a road bike, you are breaking Rule #18 :)


11

Bibs Don't move. Looks more pro. Shorts Easier to put on. Easier when the you hear the call of nature.


11

if I wear the same clothes and just go for a walk/jog, then my feet stay dry for much longer Do you have mudguards (fenders) on your bike? If not your feet are in the spray from the front wheel and will get wet unless you wear over-boots. Or gumboots. For cycling when the roads are wet mudguards make a huge different to your comfort. You'll stay dryer ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible