10

I would suggest cutting off the extra threads. If you have access to a Dremel or similar tool it wouldn't be too difficult. Doing it with a hacksaw could be a real pain. Alternatively you could check your local hardware store for acorn nuts. The smooth ends should cover the threads which is likely doing the most of the damage.


8

It's difficult to know as you haven't said what your are wearing exactly. I have this exact saddle and have covered approx 8,000km on it- wearing out no clothing (that I have noticed). I'd suggest that you saddle position is possibly not quite correct and you are moving slightly through the pedal stroke- causing friction and wearing through the clothes you ...


8

Simple: Just take two rubber bands and stretch them around the bottom of your pants. Done! :)


5

Normal detergent should be enough even with cold water. I do have sports wash but don't use it every time. Getting stuff properly dry (ideally not machined-dried if you want it to last) is crucial though, and keeping it dry for a while seems to help too. Some sports fabrics can feel dry when they're not completely. Washing stuff out in the shower is a bit ...


4

When I was a teenager, the "tight roll" was in style. Nowadays I use it nearly every day to keep my pants out of the chain. It works better than anything else I've ever tried, is totally free, and you don't have to carry anything around with you. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tight_rolled_pants And here's a video about how to do it:


3

In a similar situation - bike tire marks, trainer residue and grease spots on the carpet - we found that scrubbing the carpet using a concentrated dish detergent (like Dawn, etc) worked very well.


3

Definitely not normal nor expected. Do you wash it in any sport specific washing gel or powder? There are such detergents that are designed for the sport clothes that are often washed at lower temperatures (90° would be good against the fungus but would damage the clothes). Some are even manufactured by brands connected with disinfection, rather than laundry ...


3

Okay, all these answers involve modifying the bike or your clothing, or purchasing unique equipment; which is not what I was willing to do. I was looking for a quick instant fix, and in reading these responses I came up with one. I grabbed my odd sock bag, [ the one I keep for sox that come out of the dryer without a mate ] picked a particularly worn item, ...


2

I miss the solution I used most of my life, the enclosed bike chain. Specially fixed gear/single gear bikes as well as internal hub gear bikes are suitable for that solution. Best if done already by the manufacturer of the bikes but after sales covers do exist. My current bike is a recumbent with a half chain cover (for a normal bike) and tubes for those ...


2

Another thing that should be mentioned here is butt hair. A significant part of the process of "toughening up" the buttocks is yanking out the butt hair. As you ride it gets tangled together (obviously a bigger problem for guys) and then gets pulled out, and this, of course, causes "irritation" in the area near the butt hole. This might be mistaken for a ...


1

This stuff is not expensive. Simply unpick the stitching, and replace it. The hardest thing will be doing the stitching in a way that will stretch, because a plain straight stitch will not work. A fancy modern sewing machine can do these stitches, as can an overlocker. Example pricing seems to range from a few dolleurosuid to tens of them. It gets ...


1

Just the act of rolling up your pant leg one or two times usually covers the problem of it getting caught in the gears. I've also resorted to tucking it into my socks. It seems silly to buy clamps and devices when these two "free" options are available. Nice that it's enough of an issue that it's being brought up online. When I started mountain biking, ...


1

Like everything else on a bike, there is some maintenance associated with your helmet. The pads are designed to sop-up sweat and not grind the salt into your scalp when it evaporates. (essentially, to keep them dry, you'd need to not sweat...) If you try to keep them dry with head-coverings... you are just spreading the wetness around. Not saying that ...


1

Most helmets (certainly the last 6 or 7 I've owned) have the pads held in by velcro so can be removed and washed or replaced. A lot of people I know wear either a headband or a "buff" (google it, it's a brand name) to help a bit with the sweat. All that said, I'm surprised your helmet pads don't dry out. I also live in Luxembourg and I can ride morning, ...


1

As a long-haired individual, I have a hair tie with me at all times. When I ride with a looser pair of pants, I just put the tie around the bottom of my pant leg. Done. It also helps that I have a city/commuter/urban/hybrid bike that has a plastic piece outside the front gear set: http://archive.raleighusa.com/archive/2011-hybrid/detour-45-11/ Otherwise, ...


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