20

Increased load (i.e rider weight) on a pneumatic tire does not increase the pressure in the tire. The contact patch on the ground just increases in size until the contact patch area x pressure = load (or the rim contacts the ground). What might be happening is you are getting pinch flats when hitting bumps or holes. This is when the tire and tube are ...


15

As a heavy rider personally, I don't have many issues with flats. A normal tire on the high/maximum pressure works fine to avoid pinch flats. The key is to check tire pressure every time you get on the bike. Even a day will allow a tire to soften 10 psi, and that will allow flats to occur. Road hazard flats are not avoidable except by avoiding the ...


15

My experience is with load bikes rather than people who are loads, but the principle is the same. A tandem rated wheel is your best bet, and possibly a heavier frame. Unfortunately most Dutch bikes are built for tall Dutch people who are generally not that heavy. 370 pounds is about 170kg, which is heavy. Pacific Island rugby player heavy. What I would do ...


12

The spokes and gears are likely unrelated issues. You have done 2000km on the bike - have you replaced the chain and rear cluster yet? At you weight and those hill climbs, I would not be surprised if they are just worn out. It is also possible that at your weight and that distance the spokes have come out of adjustment, and/or now have fatiguied to the ...


8

120 KG is 265 lbs. You might want to contact the manufacturer to get an exact number on the recommended maximum rider weight. Other bikes by high end manufacturers usually are around 250-300 lbs. Usually aluminum/alloy frames are around 300 lbs while carbon frames are around 250 lbs. This isn't because carbon is weaker, but rather because carbon bikes are ...


8

So I finally got lucky and this solution has worked for a few months now. I ended up with a Mavic A719 with Sapim Strong spokes and a spoke freeze as well as the thickest Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyre they could fit on the wheel. It was built by Mamachari Bikes in Dalston, London. I've been having no problems with it since a few months now. I think using the ...


8

Give tandem wheels a try. As tandem teams go you're not all that heavy. Have the wheels built (or build them yourself) using rims meant for heavily loaded touring, Velocity Dyads in a 40- or 48-hole drilling would be one example. Velocity Chuckkars might be another option, but I'm pretty sure that the most you can get is 36 spokes. In any case what you're ...


7

The things that will make a wheel more durable in this kind of service are: Bigger tires – the bigger the tire the more space you have to cushion an impact, bigger tires also mean that the load is more distributed. Since the bigger tire gives you more support you can also run a somewhat lower pressure which means that there is more flex in the tire before ...


7

We don't do product rec here, but some general advice: You want to find the biggest tires you can fit into the bike, and run them at high pressure. The pressure written on the tire sidewall is useless (the maximum pressure depends on the rim and the tire), but in all likelihood you will be close to or exceeding it on many tires. The particular model of tire ...


7

220 pounds (100kg) is not that heavy. At £459 or about US$600 retail, the Saracen is also not an inexpensive bike. It should be more than able to handle your weight unless you're doing very aggressive biking (such as hopping on and off curbs or doing wild jumps without the proper technique). Riding on rough roads is well within the design parameters of this ...


7

Do a web search for tandem tires. A tandem bike carries two people, so typical loads are even bigger than you. Also, definitely use a pressure gauge. You may think you can tell by feel, but I ride every day and can't tell the difference between 80 and 100 psi.


7

Fact: True pro-level road racing bikes from all eras, including but not limited to the current iteratons, prioritize being light as possible while durable enough, and the right kind of durable, for a pro racer. Fact: A heavy non-racer riding for fitness and pleasure doesn't really get any utilitarian benefit from the extra bit of weight reduction that ...


7

Who to believe? You can believe that the shop owner believes that tubeless is not for him/her. But that does not mean that you are in exactly the same situation or have the same needs. Here are some high level steps for arriving at a solution that works for you. Read and listen to what others say Look for information that matches what you intend to do and ...


6

This is close to my goto answer for tyre issues. Tyres designed for touring use are meant for higher loads and inflation pressures. I run marathon plus on my commuter hybrid. They make a 26x2.0 version which is rated to a load of 260lb per tyre and 70psi inflation (which you could probably exceed a little). It's possble that won't fit your rim (see ...


6

Just want to point out that 48 spoke hubs, and 14mm axles are very common in the BMX world. I have also seen 14mm axles on downhill mountain bikes with 32 spoke wheels. Both street BMX and downhill MTB take a tremendous pounding and survive. I also note your broken spokes wheel was wired standard 3 cross method. It also looks like you had straight gauge ...


6

Other than Argenti Apparatus' great advice, if you get punctures frequently, one of the following might also be the case: You may have a small sharp object stuck in your tyre. Your rim tape may be worn out or misaligned, resulting in spoke holes rubbing through your tubes (happened to me personally, resulted in about 4 flats within a month before I realized ...


6

As a 310lbs person, you absolutely must inflate your tires to the max rated value. It's printed on the side of your tire. For safety, it is advisable to also check the rating of your rim, as it also needs to withstand the tension of your tire. If you ride at 80psi, that means that you have a contact area with the road that's 310lbs/80psi = 3.75inch^2. I.e. a ...


5

With regard to the shifting, you do need to understand proper shifting procedure. First off, with any derailleur-style bike the chain and sprockets need to be moving when you shift. (You're no doubt aware of this, but it bears mentioning.) Prior to the advent of "indexed" shifters, it was not possible to shift "under load" at all. To shift you had to ...


5

Manufacturer weight limits on bikes are a little nebulous in that they're not totally meaningless but they tend towards estimation, liability protection, and a fair line for the warranty department to take when a bike eventually breaks under a heavier load then they designed for. Going above it is an at your own risk thing because forks, wheels, and frames ...


5

As you probably know specific product recommendations are off topic here. However, three recommendations: Overbuilt wheels, heavy duty rim, 44 or 48 spokes. The biggest tire you can run, especially on the rear. Consider a full suspension bike. A 90kg rider coming off a big drop is going to generate as much force as you will going over a pothole. Props for ...


5

I won't get too much into product recommendations, but some general things to consider... You're going to wind up spending a lot of money on things other than your bicycle. At your size and presumed strength, you may need really good carbon-fiber soled cycling shoes to be able to ride any distance - plastic-soled shoes may be too flexible, which winds up ...


4

Its not unusual for wheels to go out of true within the first few miles or so of riding a new bike.. Especially if they're not built up strongly by a trained wheel builder... Most cheap to mid range bikes have wheels that are assembled by machine these days and the machines build them quite loose in a lot of cases.. Then when you put weight and lateral loads ...


4

Totally okay - you're focusing on the word tandem, when really both you and tandem riders want a "high spoke count" wheel. 36 spokes or 40 spokes or even 48 spoke hubs and rims exist but not so common in 44 spoke. The values that are important in sizing a wheel to suit your bike are Over-Locknut Distance or OLD. This is the space between the inside of ...


4

It sounds like you have two separate problems. I'll comment on the spoke breakage, speaking as someone who's had trouble with rear wheels in the past. Bike wheels are surprisingly complex. Essentially if you have a wheel that's been perfectly built, with the spokes at a high and even tension, it should stay true for a long time, without any spokes ...


4

I was a daily bike commuter in the 325lb range for almost two years. I rode both a restored '70s Raleigh Record Ace street bike and an Electra Townie 21D. Lessons Learned: Bike frames and seatposts are really, really tough. As long as you aren't boulder-hopping or crashing over pot-holes at speed, it's unlikely you'll break one, especially a new aluminum ...


4

I agree with the others: your weight is not that much of an issue for a decent quality well under $1k bike. I'm 175lbs now, but when I first started riding at 360lbs I rode a Specialized Big Hit Mountain bike. About $1,600 and overkill for the on-road riding I did. I now use a simple Trek Hybrid, and love it.. no clunky clumsy mountain bike.. (unless of ...


4

Short answer, this isn't going to be easy. Your first decision is abut Timespan. Do you intend to lose weight? If no, you're going to have to buy a bike rated for your weight. If yes, buy a cheaper bike and expect to break some parts of it. Used is totally fine. An average off-the-shelf bike might have a load rating of 90 kilo (200 pounds) or 110 ...


4

Trainers that clip onto your rear wheel aren’t a good option if you’re over their weight limits. They support much of your weight on your rear axle quick release and this can put a lot of stress on components that aren’t designed for this type of static loading. If your bike breaks or the trainer breaks, you don’t have any grounds for a warranty claim or a ...


3

Answer: Its all about risk (for you) and liability (for the maker/seller) A bike rated at for a X kilos will not suddenly fail at X+1 kilos. However beyond this point, the likelihood of load spikes increases, so the whole bike suffers and deteriorates faster even if you only ever ride in steady state. This might be known as the "knee/elbow" of a ...


2

I'm a heavier rider (250-260) and the first thing I do when I purchase a new mounain bike is invest a good chunk of change into better front and rear rims. In this day and age, the stock rims are pretty weak and tend to break first in the spokes. It's also not uncommon to have a bent rim when going off a curb. I should also note that I punish my bikes ...


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