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35

CO2 charger cartridges are used for bike tire inflation because they are a common, inexpensive product that has been around since the 1950s. Their other uses include powering air guns and inflating life vests. They were originally developed by the Crosman Corporation and marketed under the name "Powerlet". Powerlet cartridges are filled with CO2 presumably ...


26

I believe you will find these articles informative: The hidden life of a CO2 cartridge [PDF] The CO2 Cartridge … an Under-Appreciated Marvel of Technology! — George Fox Lang [PDF] At room temperature (below the 31°C/87.8°F critical temperature) a CO2 bottle is to a practical extent self-regulating. This is not possible with simple compressed air. You ...


16

Looking at manufacturers site I found repair kit with 'mysterious' blue mesh listed as "Cartridge freeze protector". It is supposed to be put over the cartridge (like in this picture) to prevent skin irritation/burn because CO2 gets very cold when discharged.


13

Think of these as a one shot device. Once the seal is cracked, any remaining CO₂ will leak out over time, and you have no idea just how much is left. . How much time I have no idea, but the problem with it is as you have no idea how much is left in the cylinder (which is as likely as not no where near enough to pump up the tire), you have to carry enough ...


11

CO2 cartridges are fine if you use them in the intended way: Roadside emergency. Otherwise they are a terrible waste of energy, resources and money. Normally a single cartridge is just enough for one tyre. You will also lack means to control the pressure that you put into the tyre. Which is OK in an emergency where you just need to have it inflated and ...


8

The short version: Yes, they are feasible. The long version: You can do a minor adjustment of my answer in this question by changing the molar masses involved. The molar mass of carbon dioxide is 44.01 g / mol. The ideal gas law says PV=nRT, where P is pressure, V is volume, R is the ideal gas constant and T is temperature (in an absolute scale, e.g. ...


8

This explains part of the reason in what may be too much detail:http://chemed.chem.purdue.edu/genchem/topicreview/bp/ch4/deviation5.html If you're going to read any of it, read the material starting after the table listing "van der Waals Constants for the Various Gases". It calculates that compressing CO2 from 1 Liters to 0.2 Liters using the Ideal Gas Law (...


7

A single 12 gram cartridge is just about capable of filling two road bike tyres to good-enough pressure to ride. The same cartridge will barely fill a single 2" MTB tyre to a useful pressure, which is why MTB riders may carry 16g, 20g, 25g, 40g, or even 50g cartridges. For completeness - here's a chart I found showing how many tyres an air cartridge will ...


7

I wouldn't go for tubeless as a first attempt to solve the problem. Tubeless might be a good solution for skinny racing bike tyres, which are rather prone to puncturing. But you really shouldn't be having much of a problem with punctures on a hybrid bike with 32C tyres. Tubeless usually requires new tyres. If you're going to buy new tyres, there are ...


7

They last pretty much forever provided they haven't been damaged (e.g. punctured or rusted or something), so go ahead and use them. If you really want to check them, you can buy a few new ones and weigh them on a scale (and compare the weights of the old cartridges to the new ones). If they're significantly lighter, they've leaked and throw them out. Else, ...


5

With regard to your question over potential weight savings, I quickly weighed the kit that I normally use to give a comparison. The mini pump that I carry from Lezyne comes in at 83g (has some subtle modifications to stop it rattling); whereas the two unbrnaded 16g CO2 cannisters that I carry come in at 118g and require a chuck to use which is another 21g. ...


4

Additional time information: These cartridges are filled with Carbon Dioxide, which is a relatively small molecule and can diffuse through butyl rubber more easily than atmospheric air can. You can inflate a tyre in seconds with these but it will likely be too flat to ride the following morning. You will have to re-inflate your tyre with normal air, ...


3

A quick way is to get the closest then then scale p is presure d is diameter pScale = pKnown * dKnown * dKnown / dScale / dScale here a close is 26 x 2.4 16 gram so pScale = 27 * 2.4 * 2.4 / 4.5 / 4.5 = 6.68 p is linear with mass so 25gram = 6.68 * 25 / 16 = 12 but on a fat bike I would just carry a high volume pump


3

Yesterday I was out biking and got a flat. My CO2 canisters are many years old, I’m going to guess about 5 to 10 years old. When I went to fill up the flat absolutely no aire came out. The canister was undamaged and any visible way. In hindsight was quite light. So yeah after many years your CO2 canisters can apparently totally let you down. I was calling ...


2

Absolutely! I've been using tubeless with sealant for years on my mountain bikes and can count the flats I had since with one single hand. Will the tubeless tire setup generally be more reliable? Sure! No flats unless your tire has a hole big enough so that the sealant can not fix. Will I know when I get a flat with the new setup? I worry with this ...


2

I inherited a Crossman pellet pistol from my father along with some cartridges .They were about 20 years old when I tried to use them.They worked but only had power for a few shots. Another 20 years later I tried again. This time They did not have enough for even one shot. SO..They last a long time but Not Forever


2

Adding an inline answer to hold the image that I think was referenced.


2

at normal temperatures (human life temperatures) and pressures all gases behave about the same with temperature variation. Check out this article and the pressure tests of air, CO2, and nitrogen at the end: http://www.powertank.com/truth.or.hype/


1

New to this tech but I love it. On very long MTB rides, you can lose a lot of physical strength past the first half. I carry a small pump too and ride tubeless compatible tyres and rims but with tubes fitted. If you get a flat 80 miles in, a CO2 inflator is like a godsend. I always carry 3x16gram bottles. Find that prepping the tyre with the hand pump to ...


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