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15

Children's bikes are usually designed with easy gearing appropriate to children. As Chris H said - they are not usually assembled by people who care that a bike is assembled correctly. From the factory it seems like everything is always too tight. My guess is that there is something that can be adjusted to make things better. Flip the bike over so it's ...


10

Short answer - no, not easily. Kids don't have the hand strength to use handbrakes properly, so a coaster brake is going to function better, once he gets the hang of it. He's activating the brake by pedalling backwards. So don't do that. Instead encourage him to push off with pedals level instead of optimal angle. That will discourage the rear brake ...


10

It doesn't make much sense to insist on one thing being the opposite of another, so let's just focus on what these things are, and you can decide for yourself what, if anything, is "opposite" of what. A fixed-gear bicycle is one in which the rear sprocket is mounted rigidly to the rear wheel, so they can only rotate at the same speed as each other. A ...


7

The coaster brake is probably designed so that it can be relatively easily opened to change the brake shoes. One option would be to open it and completely remove the brake shoes, thus disabling it. (Image from http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/coaster-hub-overhaul-pedal-brake-hub ) Whether this is safe is a good question - usually you'd want two ...


7

It sounds like the rear wheel shifted in the frame. Look closely at the axle where it connects to the frame at the dropouts, you may be able to see that it shifted. If you have the tools, loosen the nuts holding the rear wheel in place and you'll be able to recenter the wheel in the frame. As you recenter the wheel also pull back on it to keep tension on ...


6

Stopping is relatively easy - the rearmost foot is pressing back/down on the pedal to operate the brake, the other goes on the ground. If you're used to two feet on the ground when stopped you'll need to practice stopping with one foot first. You probably need to swap anyway, so the foot on the pedals is ready to push down when you move off. It's vaguely ...


6

You won't be able to simply bolt on a coaster brake. Coaster brakes are typically built into a single speed or 2 or 3 speed internally geared hub. To fit a coaster brake you will have to replace the rear wheel hub, which obviously means a wheel rebuild, or whole new wheel with a matching rim. Whether a modern coaster brake hub would fit in your frame ...


5

Easing the chain tension may help, but a coaster brake itself is a good thing - it stops the kid simply back pedalling because it's easy, but doesn't propel the bike. It should be possible to change the cog to get a lower gear ratio, but it tends to be quite low anyway - keep the old cog to restore it later. I've found the chain case on kids bikes ...


4

Add a front hand brake is the easiest way. But otherwise, you have to get used to it. You should have 2 independent braking systems anyway in case one fails (and your face doesn't count as one). But you are prone to skidding and ineffective stopping with a coaster brake in general (which is why they're pretty much only on kids bikes now a days, or in some ...


4

You should only need to replace the sprocket, nothing else. If you put on a smaller sprocket to get higher gearing/slower pedalling you need a smaller sprocket, not a larger one. You may need to remove a chain link. Those parts should be standard, the same as on an adult bike, and any bike shop should be able to make the switch. Coaster brakes are common in ...


4

What I'm guessing is happening is that your reaction arm (the thing on the left of the diagram) is not fixed in place. When you brake the shoes of the brake are pushed out from the axle into the shell of the wheel hub. The idea being that the axle is fixed in place and the shoes drag against the shell. If the reaction arm was undone, the friction of the ...


4

Most people who aren't using a manufacturer grease are using a high temp automotive grease. I'd suggest looking at the manufacturer's recommendations and following them; brakes aren't a place to save a few bucks. 220 C seems low for the type of grease; people have failures with high temp automotive greases which often rated for 100 C+ higher than that on ...


4

Your guess is right, it's a way of dialing chainline. Most commonly you use it in the more outboard position. It's easy to just measure front chainline and both rear chainline options and see which position is optimal.


4

You are right, coaster brake hubs do employ the same mechanism as free-wheel hubs. The difference is, that the coaster brake limits the backwards movement of your pedals, which the pure free-wheel does not: Fixie: Pedals have a fixed connection to the wheel, so they always move with the bike. Back-pedaling is not possible. Coaster brake: Bike can coast ...


3

Are you sure that the friction comes from the hub, not from tyre rubbing against frame? Axle mounting point looks as it is not tightened properly. Second thing to check is to assure that hub is not screwed too tight. I would personally unscrew arm-side of the hub and check the clutch and its "spring" condition. It's easy, no special tools required. Check ...


3

The coaster brake is the primary brake. It should be used as your first means of stopping. Rim brakes on coaster brake bikes are typically a safety design. If the chain were to break or come off the sprocket you would have no coaster brakes. In the U.S. the hand brake is normally installed on the front wheel. The front wheel provides more braking power as ...


3

What you most likely have is an old-fashioned coaster brake, along with a hand brake. In reality the coaster brake is probably more "natural" for someone learning -- the hand brake is mostly an affectation designed to make the bike appeal more to boys (of all ages). But it is possible to disassemble the rear hub and disable the brake in most cases. There ...


3

The term "cone nut", on a bike, generally refers to the nuts that comprise the outer half of a bearing race (the inner half being formed into the wheel hub or whatever). The "cone" side, which faces inward, has a concave profile so that the balls will roll smoothly in it. It's hard to tell what you have from your description. I do vaguely recall some ...


3

Pelago web site says this bike comes singe speed or with a 3 or 9 internally geared hub, CB-E110 is a single speed coaster brake hub, so perhaps you actually have one of the IGH options. If the chain is skipping over the rear sprocket the the chain tension needs adjusting, just as on a single speed.


2

The ends of the ring often taper, sometimes only one end does. That makes it slightly easier to get a screwdriver under the ring. But doing that often just pushes the ring around. Better to use a pair of pliers to spread the end, then a screwdriver to lift it. It will usually pop off, but the plier hand can usually block it from flying across the room. I've ...


2

I'm sure you can find exceptions, but most or at least many trainers can be made to work with nutted axles. The answers to your questions: 1. I think you mean quick release skewer and not through axle, and not practically because it would involve transplanting in a hollow axle, and hollow axles with the thread size for coaster brake hubs don't really exist. ...


2

Klunker as a term is synonymous with early mountain bike (as it is currently known). Klunkers were developed by customising early beach cruisers on 26" wheels (Schwinn predominantly) by spreading the rear dropouts to make them multi-geared and adding moto handle bars and brakes due to their durability and strength (brands such as Magura were initially moto ...


2

I don't know if this model/brand of coaster brake has one, but what I have seen this problem with Bendix coaster brakes and the culprit is a worn retainer spring or a worn driving clutch. Read this article from Sheldon Brown: https://sheldonbrown.com/coaster-brakes.html


2

I have used plenty of coaster brakes and you do not need to coast before you can brake. Move your feet till one of them has enough leverage when you start braking, change direction of movement and the brake engages. If you need more time your brake needs adjustments or even repairs. Braking should be as instant as it is with any other type of brake.


2

My AWC hub was incompatible with AW hubs. I find re-spoking much easier than working inside 3-speed hubs. I left those 3-speed bikes behind at a beach house, but based on memory: - AWC internals are removed from the coaster brake side, while - AW internals are removed from the sprocket side. 3-speed hubs that I disassembled seemed beyond repair, but to help ...


2

Well with free wheel you can also roll while you are turning your pedals backwards, while on the coaster brake if you turn the pedals back you start to brake.


2

Yes, it's possible altought redundant. Anyway I'd check the pads(replace if necessary) and give the rim a good clean up with Brake Cleaner, just to make sure there is no oil or grease on it. Also check the spokes tension, as the rod brakes pull the rim outwards loose spokes may result in loss of braking power. Cheers.


1

At least some coaster brake hubs have removable sprockets, so you may be able to replace the sprocket with a larger one. This Park Tool page includes instructions for removing the sprocket. Find the size of the current sprocket and see if it's possible to buy a larger one before proceeding of course. With a larger sprocket you will need to move the wheel ...


1

Hard to be definitive. But I thought it started with Gary Fisher and others on cruiser bikes with coaster brakes https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Fisher, the Repack Races. He went on to develop the first mountain bikes.


1

I had an exact same problem and I think I found a cause for it. As it's sold, an inner surface of a hub body on the drive side is smooth. As a clutch jams itself inside of the hub body while pedalling, the serrations on the clutch make grooves on this surface. Then, when You coast, those serrations and grooves spinning around each other make that awful noise....


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