63

The problem is ambiguity. Sometimes you'll be unfairly judged by cyclists you're trying to pass. It will happen. Sometimes it helps to reduce the sting of the judgement with some perspective on what's going on. When you’re on a bicycle, cars are death monsters. You spend your time trying to keep distance from them. You wish they would all just disappear. ...


60

As long as you give a cyclist plenty of space, and obey traffic laws and drive safely in general you are OK. 1 meter or 3 feet is generally considered enough space when passing, but I know I prefer more. If you can move into another travel lane to overtake please do that. Don't follow a cyclist too closely before overtaking, it's really scary for the ...


59

As far as I can tell, no. I've been riding 30 minutes or more every workday before breakfast for more than 10 years with no detectable ill effects. When I was riding an hour to work I'd sometimes have a small snack before riding, but only rarely. When I'm cycle touring I'll often ride for an hour before I have breakfast, as that wakes me up and gets me warm, ...


57

It is possible, but only in certain conditions. I live in a tropical country, so, 20 degrees centigrade is considered cold here. My conmute to work is almost flat, with only one climb, something a very steep 300 meters. If it were not for that, I'd be able to get to the office almost completely dry. What's the trick? I use a hardtail mountain bike with a ...


51

Health Two decades ago I threw away my bike. Admittedly it was worn, but I had that "I have a car, why do I need a bike?" thought. After a long time in a sedentary desk job, I got back on a bike and started the return to a healthy weight and muscle tone. Best to keep the habit of healthy exercise by doing plenty of it. 3.6 miles (5 km) is 15 minutes at a ...


50

I've recently started commuting to work 3 times a week and my commute is about 8 miles each way. I've found if I roll my clothes rather than fold them and pack just before I leave, there are no creases when I get to work. I always put my shoes at the bottom of my bag, then trousers rolled up then shirt. I leave my ties in my desk draw and leave my suit ...


44

I commute by bike around 8,000-10,000 km per year and based on my book keeping it is at about 1/5th (or less) the cost of running a car. After accounting for paying for the bike (i.e., devaluation) and maintenance (e.g., consumables such as chains, tires, etc), and under the working assumption that I will sell and buy a new bike in 5 years time. I projected ...


42

People who are sweating when cycling but not when walking are either cycling in hot weather (worse when steeply uphill with not enough gears), or treating a bicycle as a piece of sports equipment rather than a mode of transportation. When on foot, you walk rather than run. You don't need special clothes for walking or cycling. You do for running or racing....


41

If one bike has a rear rack, you can attach the second bike's front wheel with a bunch of bungies and tow it. I've done this, and it worked fine. Now I have a cargo bike, and the towing is simpler:


39

We have had much more success advertising it and doing it through a local bike shop or bike group. Once each, so far, that I've done. I think the psychology behind refusing a gift from a stranger is much as Criggie says. You're some random dude approaching people at night offering second hand lights of unknown provenance. Why are you doing that? What's ...


38

You don't bike to work to save money, you do it for the fun. Honestly, once you are a regular rider, you won't want to get into your car unless it's raining. That said, of course biking is a lot cheaper than taking the car. The car takes about 10l/100km (depending on car model and driving style, of course), you can do it with 0.2l/100km (olive oil, or ...


38

That's similar to my old commute (a bit further but flatter), and I didn't cycle regularly when I started. The Google estimate is probably reasonable for the second time you do it, though may not reflect rush hour traffic. The first time will probably take longer due to unfamiliarity (a trip when it doesn't matter if you're late is helpful) and eventually ...


34

Everyone else has offered good advice, but let me point out one simple thing for you: Almost no matter how hot it is or how hard I'm riding, I'm not really sweaty until I stop moving. That's because 1) I'm wearing bike clothes designed to wick moisture and evaporate it quickly, and 2) almost no matter what the weather is doing, while I'm moving I'm headed ...


33

I agree with the comments that 9 miles is a not a short ride for somebody not in shape, but you’ll get in shape for it really fast, so you should go for it. Just get ready to be sore in funny places for a couple weeks. You can make your situation better by doing a few things: Buy a road bike instead, assuming you’ll be on pavement. At the very least, ...


30

I'd maybe ask the cyclists themselves - maybe ask them to bring useful spares and have an amount of petty cash on hand to reimburse them. They might be able to bring in old lights (let's face it many of us always leap to the newest kit and have drawers full of old kit lying around). The basic tool set should include tyre levers, an adjustable spanner/...


29

You will find the journey a lot less effort, as you are dramatically reducing the weight of the bike. You will also be able to accelerate much faster, as the rolling resistance will be reduced through the use of thinner tyres. Your gearing is likely to allow for faster speeds as well. If you previously had suspension, you will notice the ability to ...


28

18km a day is not far, as long as you have an OK fitness level to start with and no health issues, it is certainly achievable, but... You will not get any rest days. I was once told, you do not get fit exercising, you get fit recovering. If you ride 5 days a week, there's no recovery time. This could lead to problems since each day's effort is stressing ...


27

In general panniers are more comfortable and efficient than carrying weight on your body. There are some things to be aware of, however. Safety. Every time you set off, make absolutely sure that all the pannier straps are done up. Apart from things falling out, the last thing you want is a loose strap getting caught in the spokes. This can wreak a wheel, ...


26

Even a short sprint or uphill effort can make a big difference in how sweaty I am when I get to the office. Maintain a consistently low effort, using low gears for any uphills. Panniers are good, since backpacks and messenger bags not only insulate, but also hold your shirt directly against your sweaty back. Often I'll put my shirt in my pannier and just ...


26

Walk :) Safest. I do this from time to time (usually when one of the kids have 'forgotten' their bike), and find it easiest to do as pr above, but with a little variation. If the transported bike is lightweight and otherwise allows it, simply 'wear' it as a backpack, putting your arm through the big triangle. Once it's on, you can determine if it will Work....


26

That's not the correct skewer for the wheel. I think you likely are using the rear skewer in the font wheel. Front hubs are typically 100mm between the drop-outs, rear are 130 or 135mm (or even 145mm on some mountain bikes that have stronger through-axle designs).


25

Other things are more important than the "equipment" -- A secure place to lock up bikes Room to change, and, ideally, showers A place to store bike clothing, etc Space (maybe a workbench) for making repairs such as tire repairs In terms of "equipment", probably the pump is the most important thing. Beyond that, simple tire repair tools, a few wrenches, ...


25

Simply, I reject the premise of your question and I'm sure I'm not alone. I say that as someone who has a tourer and a hybrid, and commutes on both - the speed difference is much less than the variability in traffic volumes. In practical commuting conditions you're rarely aero-limited anyway, rather it's the speed of traffic, and to a lesser extent the ...


25

The body controls its core temperature, not the skin temperature. Skin temperatures will vary significantly, to the point they are generally considered an unreliable way to measure core temperature, especially for people under heat stress (Riding a bicycle). (Refer : here) Screening using such a thermometer is more about the "Security theater" of ...


24

Broadly, not a lot. Legally it's probably technically unlawful on several grounds (horn not used as a warning device, causing alarm, loud noise, possibly harassment), but they're all petty offences and unlikely to get a useful response from Police. If it happens in front of a cop they might pull the motorist over for a chat, but that's unlikely. My answer ...


24

Commuter or city bikes are designed for paved surfaces. A suspension fork on such a bike is not going to add much comfort, except perhaps when riding over potholes or kerbs, which are avoidable. Suspension forks add weight, which brings a different type of discomfort as you have to exert effort to move that weight around. This gets worse the more ...


23

Determining an acceptable risk level is really a subjective personal assessment, no one can tell you whether or not something is of an acceptable level of risk. As such I will give you my judgement criteria for riding on roads shared with automobiles. I avoid roads without a large shoulder or bike lane. While many still advocate for taking a lane, the ...


23

You are wrong that hybrid style bicycles have no advantages over drop bar road bikes. You kind-of invalidated your premise by saying hybrids are a compromise, which means by definition certain beneficial features have been chosen over others in order to obtain a desired result. In fact all bike styles are a design compromise. Compared to a road bike ...


22

If you have n bikes, n+1 bikes is the right amount of bikes to have. ;) Realistically, I think 2 or 3 is adequate - a cyclocross or non-racing road bike can do the first two tasks (road ride + commute) provided it has rack and fender mounts, and one mountain bike is likely good enough for the trails in one's area (if you go somewhere else where another ...


22

If you are reasonably firm at riding one-handed, you can drive them home by riding one of them while pushing/pulling the other one beside you with one hand. Let's assume that the bike you will ride is called A and the one you push/pull is B. First decide, which bike is better to be ridden and therefore will be your bike A and which hand is better to get ...


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