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Assuming you have an alternative mode of transportation between home and work that is acceptable to you, and that you can safely leave your bike at or near work, you could also 'split the difference': I had a colleague aged over 50 who on average cycled to or from work every day, on a route that was around 40km one way over a 600m mountain (600m gain and ...


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Absolutely, yes! I'm riding 25km each way (in Melbourne AUS). Normally takes me less than 1 hour each way - I average speeds of 25km/h most days with strong headwinds. You might want to confirm you will have end of trip facilities (showers) at your disposal when you get to your destination. At around 10km you might start to break a little sweat even if you'...


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Yes If the roads are bike-friendly, then it sounds like what you are trying to achieve is definitely possible. If you don't want to have a hard time of it and have to shower at either end, you could even just get an ebike that would do most of the work for you. It isn't cheating if you aren't racing; you are just trying to get to work.


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Very much so - I've done a 30 km each way commute over terrain that was half hills, half flat, for two seasons. It can be practical or not, depending on what you're comparing it to (underground is always quick, public transport I usually out-ride). Either way it was only 5-10 minutes more than a car in city traffic, and often I found myself repeatedly ...


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That's similar to my old commute (a bit further but flatter), and I didn't cycle regularly when I started. The Google estimate is probably reasonable for the second time you do it, though may not reflect rush hour traffic. The first time will probably take longer due to unfamiliarity (a trip when it doesn't matter if you're late is helpful) and eventually ...


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Yes, you can ride that distance daily. You might find it hard at first but it should definitely be doable. I can't say if the Google estimate is any good - it will depend on how fast you ride and delays at intersections and road crossings. Try riding the route on a weekend to get an idea of how hard you find it and how long it takes. Then try at regular ...


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I am wondering if it's possible to commute daily by bike. Easily. I used to do almost 60 km round-trip daily. Well, it'll be easy after a while. If you're not used to riding every day, it'll be pretty difficult at first. Google predicts it takes 52 minutes (one-way). Do you think it's an accurate prediction? That depends on you. 17 km in 52 minutes ...


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Great idea - smaller 650B wheels with winter tyres will be easier to swap than swapping tyres on your only set of wheels. As long as your fenders / mudguards are wide enough to cover your wider tyre, and large enough to not touch your larger tyre, then they'll work fine for the smaller and narrower tyre. Note that we consider specific brand recommendations ...


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Having a speed indicator on the back of the bike, like some comparatively slow cars have ? example Having a 35kmh sign hanging behind your bike is the most direct way to indicate you can go to up that speed. Problem is that it will not work with all the drivers who won't read or think about the sign.


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Your very question has actually been answered by GCN (below) and Specialized and has been partially answered in What's more aerodynamic on flat bars: backpack or pannier? Essentially the in order of fastest to slowest: Large saddle bag (i.e., bike packing bags) Back pack Pannier By far the panniers will be the slowest option as you are hanging the bag ...


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