64

It is a known psychological fallacy (sunk costs fallacy) that already having spent too much resources (time, money…) on something that turned out to be a mistake somehow justifies persisting in doing that instead of switching to something else. Because it is irrational, it is hard to use rational logic to persuade. Maybe pointing out that the very feeling ...


64

Was going to comment, but I'll make this an answer - it's the bike, not you. No, I really do mean it's the bike..... The bike as a fixie with 48/19 gearing is suitable for a cycle fit 20-something year old hipster with great knees now and a good health insurance plan for future orthopedic consultations. Installing the freewheel helps make it more versatile, ...


52

Health Two decades ago I threw away my bike. Admittedly it was worn, but I had that "I have a car, why do I need a bike?" thought. After a long time in a sedentary desk job, I got back on a bike and started the return to a healthy weight and muscle tone. Best to keep the habit of healthy exercise by doing plenty of it. 3.6 miles (5 km) is 15 minutes at a ...


49

The bike you have is a decent low/mid-range hybrid bike with entry-level name-brand components. It should absolutely be mostly trouble-free with basic maintenance for a daily 4 mile commute. While replacing the cheap plastic pedals with a decent set of metal or high-quality poly pedals is standard business for any new bike, the other problems are worrying. ...


40

Even with an e-bike going to 150 miles a week is a big jump. Likely you just need to have a few rest days to allow your body to adapt and recover. 3 weeks is the range in where you start run into problem with long term recovery. I'd suggest switching down to 3 days a week until you feel completely recovered every day. Also lay off the strava, going for ...


39

You don't bike to work to save money, you do it for the fun. Honestly, once you are a regular rider, you won't want to get into your car unless it's raining. That said, of course biking is a lot cheaper than taking the car. The car takes about 10l/100km (depending on car model and driving style, of course), you can do it with 0.2l/100km (olive oil, or ...


38

That's similar to my old commute (a bit further but flatter), and I didn't cycle regularly when I started. The Google estimate is probably reasonable for the second time you do it, though may not reflect rush hour traffic. The first time will probably take longer due to unfamiliarity (a trip when it doesn't matter if you're late is helpful) and eventually ...


24

I would simply steer away of the bike vs car perspective, as people will instantly start obsessing over two metrics: cost and speed. Neither of these capture some of the true benefits of cycling. I would also be careful to steer away from any language that could implying that they have been making a "poor choice" by owning and maintaining a car. Rather, I ...


22

I have found that if you don't want to invest in equipment the best way to improve efficiency is by ensuring you are fitted properly to the bike you have. For example: Many non-cyclists do not have the optimal seat height set, or their reach to the handlebars is too great or too compact. If you don't want to invest in equipment, invest in knowledge and ...


22

I moved house in August, and have had a 26 km commute so roughly similar. Mine's got 50 metres drop on the way to work, so mostly flat. In my experience, you're in the distance where comfort becomes more important. Anyone can smash out a short commute every day, but these longer ones cumulatively build up on you. Clothes So expect to spend money on ...


20

Firstly, I do agree with some of the other answers that riding better can help - my main hazard is glass, and I simply got fewer punctures as I got better at spotting and avoiding it. Knowing how to avoid or handle bumps and potholes is similarly useful. Why does my bike constantly break/need servicing? Some of your issues are normal, but some are ...


19

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2920084/ - "On average, the estimated health benefits of cycling were substantially larger than the risks relative to car driving for individuals shifting their mode of transport." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22124913 - "We estimate that beneficial effects of increased physical activity are substantially ...


19

This site seems to have some good answers to your questions. It says Google assumes a baseline moving speed of around 16km/hr (10miles/hr) regardless of trip distance. but if you read more you can see there are adjustments to that baseline. For some routes where I've actually compared, I divide the Google cycling time by 1.5 to get an estimate of how ...


19

Great effort on both the write-up and the commitment to start riding again. Try and separate the issues: Your route was suboptimal due to trusting google Getting off and walking a bike is surprisingly tiring your speed is quite fast for someone who is just coming back to riding after a multi-decade long break You were under time pressure to avoid being late,...


17

My case is a particularly striking example: I would have to pay £8 per day to park. Plus another couple of pounds on fuel. I have a collection of bikes, but one that's perfectly adequate for this journey cost less than a single week's parking (second hand). Another week's parking gets a helmet and basic lights, and after that it's as good as free money. ...


16

If you really want to find out, look for a local time trial route and see what people can do on that. There's also an advantage coming up behind someone - not so much the aero advantage as you have to get close for that, but the knowledge that there's someone to catch up with - your head goes into race mode, even just a little, but theirs doesn't. Some ...


15

A (decent) bike from the '90s would not be significantly different† from (a decent) one only a few years old except for a small weight difference and possibly lacking brifters, which are de facto standard on road bikes these days. This statement is of course excepting top-of-the-line superbikes made of carbon fiber and dragon's blood. Check it for stuff ...


15

Definitely bike that sort of distance. As for whether to treat yourself to a new bike or not, that's harder to answer. An old, beat-up bike will still function perfectly well provided it's serviced. This might seem a lot of money at the time, but it's still cheaper than a new bike. You'll also be less concerned about leaving it locked up all day outside, ...


14

Adding mud-flaps to both fenders will greatly reduce spraying water on to your bottom bracket, feet and bicyclists riding behind you. Mud-flaps can be made easily & cheaply by cutting a part of plastic bottles for milk /water/soda-pop and screwing them on to end of mud-guard/fenders (ensure there is enough clearance between screw and tire). Plastic ...


14

Don't forget lights. Many people who only ride during the day/nice weather don't bother to put lights on your bike. But in heavy rain, it's sometimes darker (especially closer to sunrise/sunset), and visibility is reduced. Having lights and also reflectors will help you to be seen and improve your safety. If you don't mind getting wet, and use a waterproof ...


14

There are lots of things you could try: Perhaps you could borrow a lighter bike with clipless pedals to see if you like it. Oops, never mind, you vetoed this option ;) You could make sure that your bicycle is adjusted for fit as well as possible, and is free of maintenance issues. Professional fittings by experts are available but are quite expensive. If ...


13

2) Google maps estimates that this distance would take 2 hours to complete. Would it be possible (depending on the bike and fitness) to do this distance in about an hour? Given that most commutes have a number stops, to ride 35 km in an hour you would be having to be averaging speeds around 40 kph+ when moving (likely more depending on the length of stops). ...


13

If it's bad luck, it's very bad luck. Some of those are issues I haven't faced in 30 000 miles (handlebars and BB shouldn't work loose). Mudguard and chain case issues could probably be fixed with self-locking nuts (they work loose, then the flexing causes breakages). The loose cranks and a few of the other issues sound like they weren't properly tightened ...


13

Yes, you can ride that distance daily. You might find it hard at first but it should definitely be doable. I can't say if the Google estimate is any good - it will depend on how fast you ride and delays at intersections and road crossings. Try riding the route on a weekend to get an idea of how hard you find it and how long it takes. Then try at regular ...


13

Daniel, what is your actual question? Us strangers on the internet cannot tell you if you are genetically gifted, you must test your biology yourself. I guess the best you can expect from this community is to suggest such tests to you: VO2 max red blood cell count levels of hepatic gluconeogenesis hematocrit level Community members, please add to and edit ...


13

4.1 miles, mostly flat, are on paper doable by any human with two legs in about 90 minutes. Walking. A bicycle? it should be at least 1/3 quicker (although I would expect it to be 3 or 4 times faster than walking). Even a super-heavy dutch bike will allow you to cruise at 8-10 miles per hour, so the distance should take you about half an hour. So it is the ...


12

I have carried a laptop on my commute bike for closing in on 15 years now. Mainly in panniers (saddle bags). For a little while in a courier bag when when I was young and dumb. For what it is worth (aka the dangers of anecdotal evidence) I didn't have any laptop failures directly related to a bike trip. I even toured with a 17inch laptop across 800 km of ...


12

The answer given by gammapoint is surely a nice estimate to take into account when looking at Google Maps. However, as being rather close to Google through Top Contributor and Local Guides programmes (although not being an employee), I can almost surely tell: We'll never know. Unless, of course, you get yourself hired in that specific department in ...


12

Cable replacements, chain, tubes, all those are "consumables" Even spoke replacement is not an uncommon problem to have periodically. A bike isn't a cellphone to be discarded when its a bit tired - periodic maintenance is easy. Consider that if you were using a car, there would be oil/filter changes and fuel, perhaps a light bulb every couple years and a ...


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